Investment Banking or High School Teacher?

<p>My friend's son is a wonderful math student with an VERY analytical mind. Based on his credentials and his "connections", he has an outstanding chance to get into an Ivy League school. His father is an investment banker at a major firm, and he would like to see his son follow in his footsteps.</p>

<p>The son, however, does not want to go into investment banking because his father spends nearly all of his time devoted to his job, and little time devoted to his family. Even on vacations his father is working on his laptop.</p>

<p>The father counters by saying that his son is too young to know that he does not want to go into investment banking, and that eventually he'll come to his senses. "Once he starts getting those measly paychecks, he'll come around."</p>

<p>What would you advise the student to do:</p>

<p>(1) Take the low-paying job of math teacher
(2) Deal with the rigors of investment banking and reap the financial benefits</p>

<p>Perhaps he could do neither and go for a middle-paying mathematics-related job with reasonable hours, such as accounting or actuarial sciences.</p>

<p>I worked in an investment bank and hated it. If you don't love that kind of work, you'll be miserable. The hours are long and there is lots of stress and pressure.</p>

<p>If he is gifted as a teacher, than that's where he should be. It is also a difficult job but it leaves one enough time to have a family, go on vacations and spend summers together. And you can retire at a relatively young age with a great pension and beneifits. If he decides to work at a university he will have a wonderful work environment, interesting colleagues and his kids can attend school for free. </p>

<p>Sounds like the son is the one who has his priorities straight. Also sounds like dad has no idea about the effects of his own career choice on his family.</p>

<p>Ivy League - great. Forcing your offspring into a career they hate? Ridiculous.</p>

<p>My heart says he should take the high-way and go for that highly-honorable job of teaching kids, but my head says he should just follow his dad’s footsteps and become an ibanker and marry a chorus girl and live out his comfty life just like everyone else. </p>

<p>All quite on the western front, roger over and out</p>

<p>Or marry a second show wife....</p>

<p>I think the son should pursue what he wants. Dad and Son might just have different views of what raising a family means. I know money for some is the end all of the conversation. However, for some, there needs to be more to their existence than a finanical statement. </p>

<p>I have made some career choices that didn't improve my bottom line. They did however improve my family. I don't know if you can quantify monitarily what my choices meant. I'm sure I could have made more money had I made different choices... The problem for me was/is who is raising my children?
Several stops along the way, I could have chose my job and devoted myself to work and money. While I would have "more", I'd have less a relationship with my spouse and children. For me, one thing mattered over the other. I don't expect anyone to understand my values or approve or disapprove. It was a choice I made. I can live with the outcome.</p>

<p>Economics PhD -> college professor. Make more than hs teacher with the ability to do consulting projects as well with a nice lifestyle too.</p>

<p>Aaah life can be a journey...son may go to college and decide he wants to major in philosophy...or may drop out and start a business...or get a degree in mathematics, and a teaching credential...our world needs both ibankers and teachers...it will be fun for him to explore his options while in college. Its good that he is asking questions, seeking input from his Dad, knowing ultimately its his life, and his decision.</p>

<p>If he majors in math and has a GPA high enough to get hired as an IBanker, he should also have one high enough to get into a Master's program for teaching. He could work at an IBank for a few years after college to get a feel for it, and after making the big bucks and paying back loans or saving up for retirement/house/family, he could go back to school and become a teacher, work towards being a professor, or get an MBA and make more money.</p>

<p>I notice we are all throwing out opitions here. One thing matters Do what he wants to. Being miserable in your work wont help anyone</p>

<p>"My friend's son is a wonderful math student with an VERY analytical mind. Based on his credentials and his "connections", he has an outstanding chance to get into an Ivy League school. His father is an investment banker at a major firm, and he would like to see his son follow in his footsteps.</p>

<p>The son, however, does not want to go into investment banking because his father spends nearly all of his time devoted to his job, and little time devoted to his family. Even on vacations his father is working on his laptop.</p>

<p>The father counters by saying that his son is too young to know that he does not want to go into investment banking, and that eventually he'll come to his senses. "Once he starts getting those measly paychecks, he'll come around."</p>

<p>What would you advise the student to do:</p>

<p>(1) Take the low-paying job of math teacher
(2) Deal with the rigors of investment banking and reap the financial benefits"
Just because his father is a successful IB doesn't mean that the same will happen with his kid,and most likely it won't happen since the kid is not into IB...Plus if the kid enjoys teaching, he could end up beeing a college professor...</p>

<p>Maybe this kid doesn't like the pressure to publish either. Depending on what field, positions at colleges may be difficult to get. I know fairly bright people who got offers only from colleges in less desirable locations. </p>

<p>old but wise,
As for "measly paychecks", I think your friend forgets to tell his son that he's not gonna inherit any from him. That would really make him think twice! :D</p>