Is it ok to check the hispanic box on the application if

<p>your grandmother is Argentinian, but of European ancestry? I've heard this might be ok and that people have done it successfully.</p>

<p>"Is it OK for me to try to game the system through a quirk although I have very little to no actual ethnic or cultural affiliation with Hispanics -- thereby possibly pushing aside someone who actually is Hispanic?"</p>

<p>Strikes me that the answer to both questions is the same...</p>

<p>The Hispanic box is for people who consider themselves Hispanic, or at the very least have stronger ethnic connections.</p>

<p>
[quote]
"Is it OK for me to try to game the system through a quirk although I have very little to no actual ethnic or cultural affiliation with Hispanics -- thereby possibly pushing aside someone who actually is Hispanic

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</p>

<p>The answer depends on whether you recognize ethnicity as a valid basis for an admission decision. If you don't; hispanic all the way. Otherwise it's probably deceptive.</p>

<p>This topic always seems to get people going. Someone always has to offer commentary on the rightness of ethnicity as a criterion for admission. Whatever. The way I look at it, if someone asks, "Do you have Hispanic heritage?" you answer that question honestly. If you do not know what the definition of "Hispanic" is for the purposes of a particular institution, you ask. </p>

<p>For instance, the College Board "National Hispanic Recognition Program" defines Hispanic/Latino descent as covering anyone who is "from a family whose ancestors came from at least one of these countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Spain, Uruguay or Venezuela." This ancestry must account for at least one-quarter of one's ethnicity. Under this definition, the OP might or might not qualify, depending on what he or she means by European vis-a-vis the grandmother. (Spain=yes; Portugal=no.) Then there's the 1/4 calculation. (Post-workday cocktail="advanced" math off the table for absweetmarie tonight.)</p>

<p>Bottom line, the OP should find out what the definition of Hispanic is for the purposes of whatever form he or she is filling out. Check yes or no accordingly. How hard is this, really?</p>