Is it true that graduate students are not considered as real Yalies?

<p>I saw this on a forum in China.</p>

<p>In the old, antiquated, WASP notion of the "Yale man", no they are not.</p>

<p>in new haven, they most definitely are.</p>

<p>and certainly everywhere else too in the modern world.</p>

<p>everyone who goes to Yale is a Yallie. I don't think I get your question.</p>

<p>Nothing much, I just heard that Yale has a uniuqe tradition of college concentration. One cannot be considered as a real yaleman without a degree from Yale college, even if he uses five or six years at Yale to get a Ph.D and then spends the rest of life there as a faculty member.</p>

<p>Many do not consider graduate students to be real Yalies. For instance, President Clinton is usually identified as "Yale Law school graduate" or "Georgetown graduate" and only rarely as "Yalie."</p>

<p>However, two recent articles in the Yale Daily News refer to Yale grad students as "Yalies." The first discusses Joshua Walker GRD '06, a former University of Richmond undergrad. The second discusses Yul Kwon LAW '00.
<a href="http://www.yaledailynews.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=33099%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.yaledailynews.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=33099&lt;/a>
<a href="http://www.yaledailynews.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=33138%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.yaledailynews.com/Article.aspx?ArticleID=33138&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Would you call Fox News commentator BILL O'REILLY a Harvard man because he graduated with a masters from the JFK SCHOOL OF GOVERMENT at Harvard?</p>

<p>Answer: no, however Bill O'Reilly who actually received his undergraduate degree from some 2nd rate college on Long Island - still pretends to be a "Harvard Man"</p>

<p>"One cannot be considered as a real yaleman without a degree from Yale college, even if he uses five or six years at Yale to get a Ph.D and then spends the rest of life there as a faculty member."</p>

<p>By that definition then, I guess even Richard Levin isn't a true Yalie.</p>

<p>well i guess that female alums arent considered to be 'yalemen' either...</p>

<p>I don't think it's any real secret that Yale College is the heart of Yale University, and so going to Yale College might be the more unique "Yale experience," whatever that may mean.</p>

<p>But I think it's just a matter of what school (that you went to) that you most identify yourself with, and I think you normally are just more attached to the institution you went to as an undergrad.</p>

<p>But are you technically not a "Yalie" if you did't go to the college? I don't think so. I mean, Yale is certainly happy to claim Bill Clinton, Arlen Specter, et. al as Yalies, even though they're law school folk.</p>

<p>All the best,
David</p>

<p>I think I'll still call them Yalies, I go by both, so clinton would be a Washinton and a Yalie</p>

<p>
[quote]
Answer: no, however Bill O'Reilly who actually received his undergraduate degree from some 2nd rate college on Long Island - still pretends to be a "Harvard Man"

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Actually Bill O'Reilly refers to himself as a Harvard Man only on the rare occasion that it suits him. He much prefers to play up the fact that he was a poor kid who grew up in Long Island and faced "incredible hardship" as he went to Marist (I think thats what it was) and the rich NYU/Columbia kids made fun of him.</p>

<p>President is even not necessary to be an alumnus. </p>

<p>Quote
"By that definition then, I guess even Richard Levin isn't a true Yalie."</p>

<p>I did the last part of my graduate work at Yale and I taught there for three years. I developed strong emotional bonds to both individuals at Yale and to the "ethos" of the school. Basically, as an ambitious resident is Surgery, I was told my primary duty was to make sure the Students received the best possible medical education. As a young faculty member I even became an "associate" fellow of Timothy Dwight for a year. I was never made to feel like an outsider.
So, I am a great fan of Yale, I am certainly a part of it and have a lot of connections there, but I would only be fooling myself if I called myself a Yalie. I saw up close the life of a "Yalie". The residential college environment, the way faculty is energized by working with the students, the bonds students form in that context, etc. I loved being a part of "IT", but it is better to be the young person hungrily and obliviously consuming the lavish banquet of "IT" obsequiously laid before him/her. There is even a saying amongst academicians at Yale: "It is better to be from Yale than at Yale".
Yale, for me, was great but I used to hope upon a dream that one of my kids would be lucky enough to get into Yale so he could get the whole thing.</p>