Is it true that transfer students end up being behind on coursework once transferred?

<p>I've heard that alot of people that go to a CC and transfer to a UC after 2 years have less coursework done compared to the students who've been there since freshmen year. Is this true? A had a friend who ended up at a sophomore standing despite doing 2 years worth of course work at a CC. And another who had to catch up on units at a CC while attending the UC she got into.
Right now my parents are urging me to go to SFSU instead because they fear the same will happen to me. And just apply to a high end school for my MBA.</p>

<p>I've heard this a few times too and I'm a bit worried as well (though I am a cc student and going to hopefully transfer to UCI in Fall 2011). I know I'm going to have plenty of units going in, but still, the thought lingers.</p>

<p>The only thing I can think of regarding what you said above happening is the fact that people at cc can only take lower division general ed. People who go straight to a university often have the opppertunity to take upper division classes and/or u.d. general ed classes when they are in their first or second year (I don't want to say freshman or sophmore, considering I have a friend who is a senior standing and just finished her first year at college...). </p>

<p>That's pretty much the only reasoning I can think of as to why transfers may be a bit behind.</p>

<p>I think it depends on the situation. As long as you have the units you will be in junior standing. I am transferring to UCSD in the fall and my classes from my CC are now showing on my UCSD transcript and I have 100.5 units, above the 90 needed to be a junior. But the girls I am going to be living with this year who are all juniors and have been there since freshman year have around 120 units.</p>

<p>As long as you get your prereq's done you should be fine. There are going to be those majors and colleges where a course won't articulate and you will have to take a lower div course at the college you are transferring to. </p>

<p>SFSU is a good school, my best friend will be attending there in the fall. But from my understanding of it from her and other people is that it can be really difficult to get classes you need. So while you might need less classes, it might take you longer to get those classes you do need. A friend was telling me they had to stay another year purely because she couldn't get into the classes she needed. Also at SFSU you have to do, I think, 3 breadth classes completely unrelated to your major. And the last thing, comparing my best friend's financial aid package at SFSU and mine at UCSD (we both have an EFC of $0) my financial aid package was way better. Less loans, less work study, more grants. </p>

<p>Thats just sort of my two cents. I got all of my prereqs done that I could get done, if I was doing just my econ major I would finish in 2 years, including studying abroad. I am planning to double major so it will take me 3 years but Im not worried about being behind the other juniors that have been there since freshman year.</p>

<p>Nope, my orientation counselor said I'd be graduating early. Completely the opposite.</p>

<p>I was under the impression that the average transfer student (as in one the one that actually follows through in transferring) would be taking more coursework than the average university student in order to transfer in 1-2 years.</p>

<p>I guess it depends on your major and on the classes offered at your CC.</p>

<p>yeah and sometimes you have to take x-class @ x-college becus no articulation agreement or substitute class</p>

<p>Completely depends on your major. Engineering/science majors usually don't have all prereqs available in CCs, which might make our stay longer.</p>

<p>As others have said it completely depends on your major. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that because you're aiming for an MBA you're going to be applying as some sort of a business or econ or other social science major. If this is so, then you should have no problem finishing up the major in time as those majors are relatively light. However, even if you are majoring in a science; if you completed all pre-reqs b4 transferring in, you should still be fine</p>

<p>I am a fall admitted but I am taking summer classes and now I just finished session 1 at the UC. I spent 2 years at cc and transferred to UC with 105 units. I plan to graduate within a year so that why I tried to maximize the unit I transferred and it is the same reason why I take summer classes.</p>

<p>I think what your concern will depend on your major. If you are major in some kind of engineering; probably you may need to spend 3 yrs rather than 2 at UC. However, that is not the big deal. The important thing that you need to worry about is that UC Upper classes are COMPLETELY different level compares to CCC classes. VERY DIFFERENT LEVEL. I just got an unofficial grade; from 3 upper classes(total 12 units) I took during session 1, I got only 1 A, 1 B-, and 1 C+...so total GPA 3.0 while it was very easy to get all A at cc even with the double course load (i've done that before). </p>

<p>Anyway, all I can suggest is that you should take any courses at CC that you feel you are weak. For example, if you think you are weak at Math then take some basic math or the math course you think you need to review. It will help you a lot later when you are at UC.</p>

<p>And forget about MBA for a while, you have to do it step by step. First, do your best to get into a good UC. Second, try to get a good gpa there. Third, get a good internship. Fourth, get a good job at a good company. And once you get a job, then try to get good GMAT and work for like 3 or more years then finally you should be get into a top business school.</p>

<p>"The only thing I can think of regarding what you said above happening is the fact that people at cc can only take lower division general ed."</p>

<p>I think that's true for the most part. A biochemistry and molecular biology transfer has the chance to take organic chemistry at community college, but it's listed as an upper division course in the UCD catalog. I was told that it was a sort of gray area between lower and upper division on that instance.</p>