Is medicating students the "new black"?

<p>My kids are very young (I'm "almost" a parent right now) and I'm starting to read with great interest about how being a kid today is a lot different than when I was a kid. Another thread really opened my eyes about how common medication is becoming.</p>

<p>Are medicated kids the new norm at schools? How many of you medicate your kids for various reasons? Do pretty much all parents medicate for one reason or another? </p>

<p>When I was a kid a few years back, very few kids were medicated and the typical attitude toward most childhood issues was "deal with it and grow up."</p>

<p>It is correct to say that the attitude about medicating students has really changed in the last fifteen or twenty years?</p>

<p>Medicating kids is a horrible practice. Everyone is over-drugged. Maybe you should think for yourself about the health of your kids, not how common it is at schools.</p>

<p>And what exactly does "the new black mean"?</p>

<p>The "new black" is an expression referring to the latest craze.</p>

<p>The</a> new black - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</p>

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Maybe you should think for yourself about the health of your kids, not how common it is at schools.

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<p>I am thinking about the health of my kids! I don't like mind/mood altering drugs and don't want my kids on them. But I'm wondering how common it is for other kids to be on them.</p>

<p>But when you are crammed in classrooms and dorm rooms like cattle and spread germs quickly, it makes sense to take some precautions. College kids are always sick and coughing and not getting proper sleep.
In general the thing I find scary is kids have access to everything on the internet at such a young age. I remember being a teen before even seeing a copy of a nude magazine and it was a big deal. Kids these days probably know everything about sex before they are even old enough to date.</p>

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How many of you medicate your kids for various reasons?
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<p>I medicated my child because it's the new black and I always like to be on trend.</p>

<p>I mean, really, is this thread a joke? Unless you are the parent or doctor of the child in question, then you have too little information to draw a meaningful opinion. What else is there to say beyond that?</p>

<p>I don't understand how you can "almost" be a parent.
Is that like "a little bit" pregnant?</p>

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Do pretty much all parents medicate for one reason or another?

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Um, no. Unless you're talking about acetaminophen?</p>

<p>I just don't buy all the "bad parenting trend du jour" stories in certain "news" outlets. If people need medication, they should have it.</p>

<p>Can you be more specific? Are you referring to ADHD meds, or antidepressants, or bipolar meds, tylenol, or what? Psychoactive drugs are certainly controversial, but there are also those for whom they are life-saving and life-salvaging. Most parents think long and hard before medicating a child.</p>

<p>Your question about whether all parents are medicating is pretty absurd. I don't even know why I am answering this.</p>

<p>(I did look at the link for "new black", and its origin is in fashion, as in "Pink is the new black." Kind of odd use of the phrase here.)</p>

<p>Since you are a 'new' parent...let me give you some advice....never say never because as sure as the sun will rise you will find yourself with a child who needs some sort of medical intervention and I promise you, you will not be saying "deal with it and grow up."</p>

<p>It's easy sit smugly on the sideline judging other parents but until you're faced with a particular situation you really don't know how you will respond. My child has never been 'medicated' as you put it but he has friends who literally wouldn't be starting college in the next two weeks had they not been diagnosed with ADHD and been given medications to help them. Each and every one of these kids will be a success in life because they had parents compassionate enough to seek help when they needed it and not just tell them to 'suck it up.'</p>

<p>You know what they say..."I was a really great parent until I had kids."</p>

<p>The trend, or attitude towards medication has changed in society. Period. Giving children medication is simply an extention of that. I give my kids OTC allergy meds. Sure beats the shots I had as a kid. For the most part childrens medications are safer than 30yrs ago, not simply mini versions of the adult dose (or at least understanding that children are not just little adults and metabolize medication differently).</p>

<p>Having said this, if your real question is the efficacy of treating children with psychopharm, that's an entirely different subject. I would suggest you be careful in making these judgments if you have not raised a child that could be potentially helped by one of these drugs. It is a personal decision that should be made between a parent and trained and trusted Dr. No one situation is the same. </p>

<p>Mind/mood altering drugs would include LSD, dope, cocaine, alcohol, and other recreational drugs. I would suggest that you not put your kids on them either.</p>

<p>I'm squarely with the never say never crowd. That said, we do know parents who medicated their kids from Bs to As...in my opinion perfectly healthy kids which is an entirely different than medicating for bi-polar or a disabling disease. You'll never convince me that Bs vs. As is a disabling disease. But that attitude will stir the pot on these forums.</p>

<p>S2 was diagnosed with ADHD when he was in third grade. We chose not to medicate. Especially after trying a dose of Ritalin for myself once. It and other similar drugs are the equivalent of speed, often with a major crash once coming down. We have managed with behavorial changes and by making son aware of his condition. He is now a rising HS sophomore and a 4.0. This is not to say he doesn't still have challenges -- he does. But I've watched friends and co-workers put their kids on these meds and after years of use these kids are still really struggling. Drugs are not the end all for ADHD.</p>

<p>I am not against medicating if the child needs it and only the parents and children concerned, in consultation with a physician, should be making those judgment calls, not anonymous posters on message boards.</p>

<p>I have a child with conditions that could be medicated, but we chose not to medicate for a variety of reasons, none of which have to do with current trends or fashions.</p>

<p>Momlive's post is spot on.</p>

<p>Momlive, I often say that I would be a great parent if it weren't for my kids. And I agree that you are spot on.</p>

<p>First of all, there have been many advances in medicine in the last generation that can address issues that had no solutions once upon a time. My MIL had a brother who was a tormented soul do to severe bipolar psychosis, and back then there was nothing, nothing that worked. He also had seizures that were uncontrollable. Not to say that every such case can be successfully treated today, but the odds are better that some alleviation of symptoms can be achieved.</p>

<p>My middle son would have likely been dead 50-75 years ago. He was dxed with lymphoma/leukemia at age 5, and the stats given to us were about a 50% chance for him to have had an event free survival for 5 years. As a mom who hate, hate, hated to give meds to the kids unless absolutely necessary, I was hit with 17 chemotherapy and support drugs that my little guy had to take in the attempt to save his life. All of them with very nasty side effects, some of them long term. And just a week before diagnosis (which sped up the discovery of his cancer), I had refused to have him put on a general antibiotic to treat those persistently swollen lymph nodes, his only clinical sign of disease. </p>

<p>It seems to me, that we have a large group of parents who are so pro organic and holistic foods that ANY meds are abhorrent to them and they try to treat everything "naturally" rather than with drugs. My SILs both tend to be that way. No tylenol, aspirin, sudafed, tums, and they like to hold off on those antibiotics. They really try the holistic ways first, and only reluctantly turn to the doctor recommended or prescribed meds. Some are even more fanatical about this sort of thing where court orders had to be obtained to treat kids of such people who have something that is life threatening but treatable/curable with modern medicine. </p>

<p>Then you have the pill poppers. Not only are their kids on any and every drug that is reputed to have any effect on behavior, mood, health to bring the kids more in line with what they and the schools want, they may sneak some stuff in the mix that no doctor in his right mind would prescribe. I was shocked to find out that there are young people on Ambien...I know that the ADD meds are rampant and many times those kids may not need them. The focus enhancing attributes of Adderall have had many a parent wanting their kids on the drug as well as getting extra test time for the SATs and other tests. I do believe that the acceptable behavior range has been narrowed in the last 20 years, coming to quite a squeeze these days, especially in upscale school districts so that conditions and behaviors that were just considered part of a someone's personality are now things to be corrected, with drugs at times. Where to draw the line on this, I don't know.</p>

<p>Momlive is indeed spot on.</p>

<p>It's an absurd question. I personally do not know of any kids among my S's schoolmates who were medicated, although I assume there must have been some at some point. This "everyone is medicated" hype is just that.</p>

<p>I do know of at least one kid who had issues that were masked by his intelligence until he was in HS, when it all hit the fan, and another profoundly gifted kid who suffered from debilitating phobias. I'm sure meds eventually helped both of them. I certainly hope so.</p>

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Since you are a 'new' parent...let me give you some advice....never say never because as sure as the sun will rise you will find yourself with a child who needs some sort of medical intervention and I promise you, you will not be saying "deal with it and grow up."</p>

<p>It's easy sit smugly on the sideline judging other parents but until you're faced with a particular situation you really don't know how you will respond.

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<p>::::Applause::::
Unless you are a medical doctor dealing with the child / situation in question, really, what business or concern is it of yours anyway what other parents do in this regard?</p>

<p>cptofthehouse- I am very glad to hear that your son is well.</p>

<p>Exactly ^^ (referring to post # 17). I am more appalled by parents who refuse to immunize their kids and who put their kids and others around them, at risk for serious diseases that are easily avoided (eg whooping cough, measles, etc)</p>

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When I was a kid a few years back, very few kids were medicated and the typical attitude toward most childhood issues was "deal with it and grow up."

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</p>

<p>That's too bad. How many people suffered or went on to live unproductive lives, get involved with drugs, etc. that could have been helped with appropriate psychiatric intervention and / or medication?</p>