Is there any christian colleges that offer biomedical engineering

<p>I was wondering why I cant find any colleges that are christian that offer it and I'm wondering are there any and if not why not is it not a field that accepts the christian ideas or what should I not go into it unless I want to work with all atheists no offense I just want to be honest and know</p>

<p>Why? Because in biological engineering we came to the point where we are capable of synthesis of life. We can modify bacteria, viruses and our own cells. We are perfectly capable of creating exact - but younger - copy of ourselves. Obviously this is just the beginning, but we are on the point when we are "in apprehension how like a god".
Is that a thing a religious school would want its kids to get their hands on? I doubt it. with that said, you must be prepared to be doing things that will seem god-like in a lab if you go into biological engineering. You must know that it will easily challenge your belief.
..but why the fear of atheists? I consider us pretty nice people, we don't really drink virgins' blood or engage in obscene orgy (and if someone does, that's their choice and their STDs ,P)</p>

<p>I believe the question was about "biomedical engineering." Generally, that is about equipment and marrying medicine to the type of machines, mechanics, electricals, sonographics, etc. that are needed by medical researchers and practitioners. </p>

<p>These programs are most often, understandably, found in places where there are not only major engineering schools but also major medical schools, hosptitals, clinics, etc. </p>

<p>While there may be issues about genetics, so-called synthetic life, and similar issue, I don't think it has much to do w/ atheism vs. Christianity. Rather its a function of institutional type, resources, etc. And w/o doubt, many biomedical engineers fully understand the Source of birth ... and re-birth.</p>

<p>There are at least two Catholic schools -- Catholic University of America and Marquette -- that offer fully ABET-accredited BS degrees in biomedical engineering. Furthermore, CUA is a Pontifical University -- i.e. it is under direct authority of the Vatican -- so you might expect them to notice if their academic programs conflicted with orthodox Catholic theology. But apparently this is not a problem. </p>

<p>Some Evangelical Protestant schools --like LeTourneau, Messiah College, or Oral Roberts -- offer ABET-accredited "general engineering" degrees. Then they offer a biomedical "concentration" within that framework. This approach is perfectly legitimate; however, a "general engineering degree with a biomedical concentration" is likely to be less technically focused than a pure "biomedical engineering degree", and it may have a lower market value.</p>

<p>You might wonder why these schools are only accredited for "general" engineering, and not for BME or other engineering disciplines specifically. It probably reflects the small size of their engineering programs, rather than any theological issues. Large research universities can afford to pursue separate accreditation for each engineering discipline; small colleges with relatively few engineering majors don't have that luxury. Small secular colleges do the same thing.</p>

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should I not go into it unless I want to work with all atheists

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The majority of those in scientific fields do not believe in God. If you expect them to be tolerant of your beliefs, you have to be tolerant of theirs. Most of your colleagues probably won't care if you're religious; you shouldn't care if they're not. However, I doubt it would come up much in the work place, unless you brought it up for some reason.</p>

<p>With all respect due such a comment, that's ridiculous. I'm afraid manorite is in deep water, far above his/her head. Strikes as psycho-babble. No mean to demean, simply to suggest putting little credence in such imaginative fantasies.</p>

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With all respect due such a comment, that's ridiculous. I'm afraid manorite is in deep water, far above his/her head. Strikes as psycho-babble. No mean to demean, simply to suggest putting little credence in such imaginative fantasies.

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Hm, do you have any reasons for insulting my comment?</p>

<p>Let's see...</p>

<p>-Most people in science do not believe in God: Various studies suggest at least 60-70% do not, depending upon how you define the scientific field and how you define God.</p>

<p>-If you want to be treated with tolerance, you should treat others with tolerance: do unto others as you would have them do unto you, a basic tenet of nearly all major religions, including Christianity. Regardless of your religion, this is a very reasonable morality to have, and it leads to a better world.</p>

<p>-Most colleagues probably won't care if you're religious: obviously can't be proven, but it's a reasonable assumption, considering that beliefs are personal and most people are fairly tolerant.</p>

<p>-I doubt it would come up much if you didn't bring it up: when you're busy working, you usually don't have time for religious discussion, which is likely to make disagreeing coworkers feel uncomfortable.</p>

<p>What exactly sounds like "psycho-babble" or an "imaginative fantas[y]"? And maybe you "no mean to demean," but you're merely insulting my comment, rather than responding to it in any constructive way.</p>

<p>I'm sure you mean well, but suggesting "most people in science do not believe in God" is pretty ignorant. You might be able to slip that one in at your lunch table, and I trust you do. Anyone buying your ridiculous claim simply chooses to do so. You been reading too much Sagan and Hitchens and sucking up their opining as truth. Both are dead and so are their opinions. God is love. And God is clear and He is just.</p>

<p>If you're not familiar with the Confucion proverb that "when in hole, stop digging" you might want to familiarize yourself.</p>

<p>P.S. Tolerance and ignorance have significantly different definitions. Unfortunately, many in today's culture think they complement each other.</p>

<p>
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I'm sure you mean well, but suggesting "most people in science do not believe in God" is pretty ignorant. You might be able to slip that one in at your lunch table, and I trust you do. Anyone buying your ridiculous claim simply chooses to do so.

[/quote]

According to the study I'm citing, around 30-40% of scientists believe in God. 41% reject the idea of God (the atheists), and the rest are best described as agnostic (though there are flaws when using the word alone, rather than as a descriptor for theism or atheism). I did not say the majority are atheists, I said the majority do not believe in God.</p>

<p>The American Association for the Advancement of Science did the study, but here's the Christian Post's take on it: Survey:</a> 1 in 3 Scientists Believe in God, Christian News</p>

<p>Of course, if the data is wrong, I apologize, but it seems like a perfectly valid study to me. It's done by an organization of scientists, too, not some group biased towards religion or atheism that might use methods that support their own conclusion. Also, the AAAS seems to be using "scientist" as in "natural scientist," which is what I meant. I can't speak to the religious views of social scientists, as I haven't seen such a study.</p>

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You been reading too much Sagan and Hitchens and sucking up their opining as truth. Both are dead and so are their opinions.

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Actually, I've read neither. However, I take issue with lumping Sagan with Hitchens. Hitchens made a living out of being belligerent, and was some reason famous for being an atheist. Carl Sagan, on the other hand, was an accomplished scientist, did much good in advancing the cause of science amongst the young, inspired generations to take up study of the stars, was a major writer of science and fiction, did a lot of work to help advance SETI, and was generally a great contributor to our society. He was not at all famous for being an atheist or any such thing. I just looked up his views, and he did seriously doubt the traditional depiction of God, and called himself an agnostic, but unless you're intolerant and think that the religious and non-religious ought to be at war, that shouldn't color the rest of your thinking about him. Further, though he is dead, his views certainly are not, as he continues to inspire the scientifically minded.</p>

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God is love.

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I would suggest you start emulating Him, and stop with the attacks on me and on Carl Sagan. I doubt a loving God would want you to insult people and take apparent satisfaction in the deaths of those who disagree with you.</p>

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If you're not familiar with the Confucion proverb that "when in hole, stop digging" you might want to familiarize yourself.

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Ah, the irony.</p>

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P.S. Tolerance and ignorance have significantly different definitions. Unfortunately, many in today's culture think they complement each other.

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Could you please explain this? (I'm actually just asking.) It seems like you're saying that tolerance of those with other beliefs, at least as we think of it now, is bad? It would be great if you could clear up this vague and unexplained statement.</p>