Is University English A LOT harder than high school for engineering?

<p>OMG I am driven crazy by my father's complaint about my English level. He keeps saying i need to write lots of 7-8 pages long essays and read like 5,6 books every week for english.
I came to Canada 2 years ago and I am doing fine in my English class(85%). </p>

<p>So i wonder are english courses for engineering students hard? My impression is most people drop out because they fail their math or physics causes; do engineering students drop out because they fail their english courses too?
And how many english courses engineering students usually take every year?</p>

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<p>Most universities will require two semesters of English writing courses for all students (engineering or otherwise).</p>

<p>It is important to be able to communicate to both others in your field and to the general public, so it is quite reasonable for writing courses to be required. However, it is understandable that students majoring in something outside of English or comparative literature may not be that interested in writing courses that focus on the analysis of fictional literature. What you may want to do is see if various schools offer writing and communication courses using different subjects to read and write about, if it is the focus on fictional literature that is what is bothering you with respect to many schools' English writing courses.</p>

<p>The inability to communicate efficiently is near the top of reasons that engineering projects fail. Many engineering programs at BOTH the undergrad and grad level have required "technical communication/writing" courses to further prepare you.</p>

<p>Many technical documents like white papers, user manuals, engineering design/development, testing documents require a good background in writing. Proposals for new contracts are basically huge writing (and marketing) assignments.</p>

<p>Just pass your AP English Language and Composition and AP English Literature and Composition tests and you can get out of English classes for college.</p>

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<p>haha i went to a canadian engineering school and you don't need to read 5-6books a week. Its very different from high school english, i'd actually say its easier. </p>

<p>The goal of the class is to make sure you can communite your technical language to a non technical audience. While there are quite a few reports to write, its not as hard as your dad is describing. </p>

<p>Also, i have friends at a few engineering schools here in canada, it seems that there is only 1 semester worth of technical writing.</p>

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<p>Some schools require more than just a "pass" (typically seen as a score of 3). They may require a 5 to fulfill some or all of the English composition course requirement, or may not accept AP credit for such a requirement at all.</p>

<p>In any case, if the school offers a technical or science focused communication and writing course, it may be a useful one to take, as suggested by another poster above. The skills from such a course may be more useful in an engineering career than those from a typical literature or humanities focused writing course. (That said, it is still a good idea to have an understanding of the humanities and social studies, especially since so many humanities and social studies majors have little or no understanding of engineering and science.)</p>

<p>well how about the difficulty? Is it really a lot harder? and the work loaded is high too?</p>

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<p>jason - at my school, engineers can test out of the intro level writing class in a few ways. About 2/3 engineers don't have to take this class (I did not).</p>

<p>But we have a technical writing course that every engineer has to take. I actually loved it - we had about 1 assignment a week (5-10 pages), and it was actually useful. It was also easier than any writing class I ever took in high school, but my high school's english was intense.</p>

<p>I've never ever met an engineer that dropped out due to an English class. Don't worry about it. Is it a good idea to improve your skills? Yes, of course! Do you need to go All Tiger Mama on the subject? NO! Do your best. Improve your skills. See what your college offers that would most likely hold your attention. Not worth stressing over.</p>

<p>Ok..... so did anyone actually be asked to read 5,6 books a week?</p>

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<p>I meant to put to pass the AP with a 4 or a 5, the fact being that not many schools accept 3s on AP exams. Sorry for the confusion. </p>

<p>Also, what I meant is that exempting introductory classes would be wise if you already have the credit. Technical classes are another thing. </p>

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<p>English depends entirely on the professor. There really isn't a standard way to teach it, so each professor teaches it differently. From my experience, college English was much easier than high school English because college English didn't try to bombard me with massive reading assignments.</p>

<p>Technical Writing for engineers is a pretty easy and straightforward class. They show you how to write technical specifications and how to communicate in a technical manner.</p>

<p>Try 4-5 books for the semester. Who can read 5-6 books a week? How could you possibly discuss an entire book during one 55 minute class? How much depth would you get out of that? What would be the point and how the heck would you have time to do your calc homework? Your dad is truly nutty and doesn't have a clue!</p>

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OMG I am driven crazy by my father's complaint about my English level. He keeps saying i need to write lots of 7-8 pages long essays and read like 5,6 books every week for english.

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<p>Your the same guy who wanted to go to uoft right? </p>

<p>You'll take some sort of writing course first year. Most schools require you to take two or so humanities electives. </p>

<p>If you go to uoft you'll take APS 111 and i believe other schools in ontario such as queens and waterloo have similar courses. You will hate this class. It does not test your ability to write. </p>

<p>At uoft you are placed into a group and you are almost guranteed to have at least one person who can not write properly in english. You are assigned a problem to solve (this year it was traffic safety somewhere on campus). At first it sounds like it'll be alright and then you have to follow the way they want you to lay out the report and its painful and time consuming. Your mark is mainly dependent on your group as the tests are a shot in the dark since the multiple choice is so ambiguous. And you take this course both semesters.</p>

<p>I don't have a problem with taking a technical writing class, seeing as it would he beneficial to my engineering career. However, basic English should not be something that a lot of people should need to take in English, at least not if you took AP classes and passed them. I see those classes as a requirement for people who did not take advanced classes in high school or who would love to improve their skills. I am glad that I will not have to take freshman and sophomore English. I already know how to write pretty well and I do not need to know what every English term means. Honestly, I passed the AP English language test wby studying those annoying terms the night before (I hated that class and never paid attention). </p>

<p>In the end, it is up to you whether or not you take English in college (if you took the AP tests, that is). Also, I think your dad may have been using hyperbole when talking about his college days (eannoying English terms ftw........).</p>

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<p>I'm still a high school senior, but I'm pretty decent at writing, so that's no problem for me. For that reason, I do not see the point of taking English again if I already have the credit for it. Also, I hate writing.</p>

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<p>I have never taken a course that required more than one book a week, and those were pretty thin books (although sometimes archaic). If you show up and do the work, you should be fine - like Mom noted, I have never heard of someone flunking out because of the basic English courses, and regardless most schools require those courses (or something similar) for ALL majors, so if you cannot handle those courses you should not be in university. Relax.</p>

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<p>aregularguy, what do you mean by some humanities courses? I think for UofT engineering you need 9 engineering courses in the first year right? so you mean I have to take more? And did u take a normal English course except APS 111?</p>

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<p>In an engineering career, you will have to write various things (project plans, notes, etc.). While the analysis of fictional literature common in high school and college English courses may not be especially applicable, the ability to write clearly and concisely is necessary. You will want to be able to communicate engineering ideas both to other engineers and to non-engineers whom you will be working with.</p>

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aregularguy, what do you mean by some humanities courses? I think for UofT engineering you need 9 engineering courses in the first year right? so you mean I have to take more? And did u take a normal English course except APS 111?

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<p>I was referring to the degree in general. You have to take two humanities courses over your degree so its not difficult. First year you only take Engineering strategies (APS) both semesters there is no english course. Dont worry about the course if you can read and write in english you'll pass.</p>