Ithaca THE place to live for recent grads

<p>Daily Beast ranks Ithaca as the number one place to live for recent college grads. Many college towns on their list [including Madison, Boulder, Ann Arbor, Austin].</p>

<p>I LOVED going to college in Ithaca and I think it would be great place to raise a family pr to retire ... pretty tough place for a lot careers though ... clearly works if you work for a college or have a portable job like lawyer, doctor, etc ... a lot tougher if you want to work in industry or at company HQs.</p>

<p>i dont think a place makes the family...the parents do...</p>

<p>I don't really see why the hell Ithaca would be number one... It's not that great lol.</p>

<p>have to agree that the site is pretty nice (hilly and all nature loving). I hope it's a little populated 'cause I don't like total isolation lol.</p>

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I don't really see why the hell Ithaca would be number one... It's not that great lol.

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<p>You're right. It's not great. It's fantastic.</p>

<p>i would never want to live in ithaca... the campus looks pretty good but once you step outside, the houses all look so broken down...</p>

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the campus looks pretty good but once you step outside, the houses all look so broken down...

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<p>Walk through Cayuga Heights or Fall Creek recently?</p>

<p>.. a house on the lake might be nice too.</p>

<p>I would love to live in Ithaca. Actually, the place is teeming with ex-students who never left. You have to like what it offers, it was only after being there (in the summers) that I learned that life in the right small city could be appealing to me. The best way to see what it is really like there is to stay there in the summer, with a car. Many students never experience it.</p>

<p>As #2 indicated- the real challenge is being able to do something to make a living there.</p>

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.. a house on the lake might be nice too.

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<p>I'd settle for a house on Seneca if I had to.</p>

<p>it's great in summer...but winter?</p>

<p>Winter there is pretty much like winter in much of the rest of the Northeast.
People with "normal" jobs, not on campus, are getting in their cars, driving to work, staying in their heated offices all day, then driving home. Just like anyplace else. If they're smart they'll get seasons passes to Greek peak, or whatever.</p>

<p>have to agree with Mony. I mean...how much do you actually enjoy of the beauty of one place? Normally, if you live in an area, you get so uniform with your actions that even a goreous site might seem to get old because you have seen it too often.</p>

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Winter there is pretty much like winter in much of the rest of the Northeast.

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<p>Bingo. It's true that the spring thaw comes around 2-3 weeks later than places likes Boston, but so be it.</p>

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I mean...how much do you actually enjoy of the beauty of one place?

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<p>I tried to enjoy the beauty of it every minute. And that made all the difference.</p>

<p>I liked Ithaca a lot...not sure if I could live there for a long time though. However, the place definitely grows on you and I wouldn't mind going back for a bit.</p>

<p>I could still remember one particular weekend about two years ago, when I realized that Ithaca would always be that magical place for me. It would be the only place I would ever consider relocating to if only I could bring my clients with me. </p>

<p>It has some of the most beautiful natural features of any town in the country. When I hear people say it is ugly or there is nothing to do I just figure they went through it with their eyes closed. </p>

<p>I need a dose of Ithaca at least every two months to recharge.</p>