Law school grads sue their school

<p>Apparently, with more to come</p>

<p>John</a> Marshall grads sue school over employment statistics - chicagotribune.com</p>

<p>Are they filing the suit themselves??? Perhaps their law degrees are coming in handy after all.</p>

<p>This is stale news-- been done several times before in past years. They need to find a new angle.</p>

<p>Irate</a> law school grads say they were misled about job prospects | NJ.com</p>

<p>New</a> York Law School Sued for Inflating Job, Pay Statistics - Businessweek</p>

<p>Suing</a> Over Jobs | Inside Higher Ed</p>

<p><a href="http://www.opposingviews.com/i/unemployed-law-students-suing-law-schools-no-jobs%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.opposingviews.com/i/unemployed-law-students-suing-law-schools-no-jobs&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Anyone who does even a modicum of research knows that attending a third or fourth tier law school is a mistake in most cases, and it has been so for many years.</p>

<p>this is old news.</p>

<p>News flash - some grads from 3rd and 4th tier law schools might have a difficult time getting a decent paying law job.</p>

<p>But regardless of my flippant remark, the stats in this area the LS publishes should be accurate at a minimum and not misleading ideally.</p>

<p>Apparently colleges are required to accurately forecast employment possibilities 3+ years in advance.</p>

<p>Now we know why lawyers are among the most despised folks around. It starts right with law school. Don't like the outcomes-sue.</p>

<p>Maybe annasdad wants to start a thread about a motivated student could get a great education at any law school - but only if an employer would recognize it.</p>

<p>^ :) :)</p>

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Maybe annasdad wants to start a thread about a motivated student could get a great education at any law school - but only if an employer would recognize it.

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</p>

<p>I'd love to see the "research" he quotes to support that claim.</p>

<p>oldfort, you devil! :D</p>

<p>If we take for granted that students from top ranked law schools have better employment options....</p>

<p>from which undergraduate schools do those top ranked law schools draw their students?</p>

<p>Fresh</a> round of litigation targets 12 law schools over jobs data</p>

<p>I don't know if this article adds any news or not but it came up in my email this morning.</p>

<p>I don't think you can draw any conclusions from this about school tiers, without knowing the records and interviewing skills of the plaintiffs.</p>

<p>It's a shame, because when I graduated from law school in Chicago Marshall was actually respected. It certainly fell below the other 4, but the grads got jobs with smaller firms or with the DA and could actually find the courthouse, unlike some of MY classmates!</p>

<p>John Marshall's repuation in Chicago has not changed. It is respected, but nonetheless the at the bottom of Chicago law schools. There is a lawfirm behind all of these suits around the country. </p>

<p>I believe these lawsuits will lose because there is no reliance. Assuming the employment statistics are misleading, how many people pick a law school based on employment statistics? How many people will say under oath in a deposition that they would have done something different had the employment statistics been more accurate? None, I suspect. </p>

<p>However, I think these lawsuits will serve a good public purpose. The education business is becoming increasingly competitive, and we're beginning to see that schools are not immune to dishonest tactics. Whether it's employment statistics or the numbers that trigger your US News ranking, schools obviously need to be scrupulously honest. Even if these lawsuits fail, as I'm sure they will, I suspect most lawschools are now double checking how they calculate employment statistics to make sure what they do is beyond reproach, and that's a positive development.</p>

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from which undergraduate schools do those top ranked law schools draw their students?

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</p>

<p>The law schools don't care much about the source of the undergrad degree. They care about GPA and LSAT scores. However, since the graduates from top undergrad programs probably do well on the LSAT, there is some correlation there. People who do very, very well on the SAT will likely do well on the LSAT.</p>

<p>^^If you had a 4.0 GPA and a 99% on LSAT, could you count on getting into any law school in the country regardless of undergraduate institution?</p>

<p>This is a serious question...</p>

<p>"If you had a 4.0 GPA and a 99% on LSAT, could you count on getting into any law school in the country regardless of undergraduate institution?"</p>

<p>Of course not! Just like a 4.0 and 2350 SAT doesn't guarantee you getting into any top UG college regardless of where you went to HS. There are more qualified applicants than openings.</p>