Life After Ivy League

<p>Does an Ivy League degree guarantee you a three digit salary, a big house, a cool car and a contacts list a mile long with other billionaires ?
This is probably the legend that goes around. "Ivy league school open you many door!" Is that really right? or Is it still about what you do during 4 years and after 4 years. Does an Ivy League degree offer you a great advantage when it comes to job prospects as well or is it just just a fake legend?
I know that this topic is widely discussed. Especially for iBanking, the legend says that you def'ly need an Ivy league degree for such job...Those who are still in business...Is that really the case? Are all your collegues from Ivy league schools? and do they all really get 3 digit salaries? =)) Thanks..</p>

<p>PS. (I hope that I am posting this in the right forum)</p>

<p>After I interviewed a Stanford grad for it, a Princeton grad just applied for an administrative assistant position my organization has. I am sure they were choosing between working with us or hanging out with one of their billionaire friends on yachts.</p>

<p>i hope so... im all in it for the 3 digit salaries</p>

<p>^Really? I am in it for the many door it will open.</p>

<p>mohammad, I think serf was being sarcastic (I think the OP meant to say 6 digit salaries)</p>

<p>I have hired quite a few people over the years and rarely does an Ivy League degree give you an edge relative to other schools that are also considered very strong. What really matters after your first job is what skills have you got and what kind of a team player you are. The school you get a degree from is a consideration but basically we know people choose schools for a wide variety of reasons (economic, athletics, legacy, geography, etc) and as long as the school has a fairly decent reputation that is all that matters. We have hired a few Ivy League grads and they were not always good team players. They often had a tendency for elitism which turned others off.</p>

<p>oopps sorry...it is like 3 digit K salaries...my bad...i wonder what was i thinking while posting this..=))</p>

<p>"mohammad, I think serf was being sarcastic (I think the OP meant to say 6 digit salaries)"</p>

<p>My post</p>

<hr>

<p>Your head.</p>

<p>In the company I worked for we noticed that the Ivy grads had very grand expectations of what their sheepskin would give them. They balked at menial entry level tasks that the rest of us realised was part of the drill. I guess someone told them along the line that they could skip what the rest of us knew we needed to do!</p>

<p>to the OP</p>

<p>No... In fact, a lot of people who graduate from ivy league end up teaching at high schools, considered not a very rich job and certainly not 6 figure</p>

<p>Here are, off the top of my head, occupations of ivy grads I know in their 20's, who are basically friends of my kids:</p>

<p>--fireman
--grade school teacher
--high school teacher
--assistant basketball coach at his ivy
--in grad school for anthropology at his same undergrad ivy
--trader for Merrill Lynch
--i-banker for Citi who is burnt out after 3 years and just quit his job, and profession for good
--another hs teacher who was inside World Trade Center working the day it was hit...she gave up NYC banking that day and became teacher
--will graduate this spring, also Merrill Lynch but as systems analyst
--working at a private school in Jordan</p>

<p>That's about all I can think of at the moment. My point: it's a mixed bag.</p>

<p>a Fireman? (no offense please) but it just sounded so non-academic. Why would you pay $200k to college and then end up doing a purely physical job? Thats strange..
But thank you that gives me a great insight. Since not many of my friends go to an Ivy league school I dont know what to expect. (nor did my parents and their friends) So I suppose it is just an urban legend....lol</p>

<p>Well, we have a Columbia Physics AP teacher and a Harvard Econ AP/Civivs Teacher.</p>

<p>I wouldn't say that they are doing well (making 60k per year cap); but they are bright people.</p>

<p>Some would say that for Investment Banking specifically...</p>

<p>Any Ivy League degree is a NECESSARY but not SUFFICIENT condition for $$$. </p>

<p>I think this comes close to the truth.</p>

<p>
[quote]
After I interviewed a Stanford grad for it, a Princeton grad just applied for an administrative assistant position my organization has. I am sure they were choosing between working with us or hanging out with one of their billionaire friends on yachts.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Stanford and Princeton grads are lining up around the block to get administrative assistant positions. You forgot to mention the Harvard and MIT grads that ended up getting dinged for the assistant to the administrative assistant. Oh, and the mail room guy is a Caltech alum.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I guess someone told them along the line that they could skip what the rest of us knew we needed to do!

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I get the same sense from the undergrads at my ivy league grad school (not so much the grad students but maybe thats just my department, who knows). They seem to have the belief they can skip all the entry-level work, even though they're still starting off in an entry-level position. This ideology might be coming from some professors based on what I've seen.</p>

<p>At the margin, an Ivy degree or degree from some other very highly ranked college might position you better or perhaps even be critical to getting that first job. But after a few weeks (or less) on the job, the degree doesn't matter. Can you or can't you do the job? </p>

<p>I will add that there is probably some psychic benefit to the Ivy graduate. Individual confidence can create a blind spot that comes across sometimes as arrogance and unfortunately, this trait is more visible in Ivy grads than others. However, in their defense, this confident approach can also sometimes be very effective in their work and their personal lives. Some may feel personally reassured by the fact that they are associated with colleges of such academic and student quality and they also benefit from the network of like-minded people. I will add that such folks often underrate the quality of those who did not come into the workplace with an Ivy pedigree.</p>

<p>"Any Ivy League degree is a NECESSARY but not SUFFICIENT condition for $$$."</p>

<p>LOL, what a load of bs. If anything, it's the opposite. Ivy League degrees are often sufficient to get a high paying job, but hardly necessary. The people who don't get them choose not.</p>

<p>Not everyone goes to an Ivy thinking of it as pre-professional training. Its not vo-tech, remember. They go there for the experience of being around other bright people like themselves, and to be taught by Nobel prize winning professors. The schools are rich in history and tradition. (and this is coming from a Non-ivy grad) They are different. Having said that, graduating from one guarantees nothing.</p>

<p>I know plenty of unsuccessful people that graduated from ivy league schools. Just because they are bright and hard working doesn't mean they have any sense when it comes to finding a job or picking a career. If they new what there were doing, they would probably be better off than must others, but many are completely blind to this aspect and school stays the singular focus for them.</p>