Major Complementing a MBA?

<p>OK I first intended to major in Engineering but I am not sure if Engineering is the best option for me.</p>

<p>My graduate school plans are more or less fixed on a MBA and I was just thinking what would be the best major (undergrad) that would help and complement a MBA!</p>

<p>So what should I apply for?</p>

<p>I am planning a major in Economics and a minor in Industrial Engineering or a major in Finance and minor in Economics or Accounting?</p>

<p>Which is the better option? Best major/minor combo with Economics,Accounting,Finance and Engineering?</p>

<p>Any better option in respect to what is good(Better ranked and higher paying) at UMich?</p>

<p>Can you even minor in an engineering field?</p>

<p>In short: If your goal is to get into a top MBA program, the most important criterion is quality of work experience. Probably the best way to get a top job coming out of Michigan is to either 1) enter the Ross School of Business (major: Finance/Accounting) and try to get a top high finance or consulting job (MBB<em>) after you graduate, or 2) stick with engineering and try to get a top job from a company that recruits at the CoE (Google?</em>). Many MBA students have engineering degrees. However, it seems like if you do Engin you would do IOE, so the sweet Google jobs would not be within your reach (I think... the top jobs are for programmers?) You could do IOE and get into trading, however, but that's more or less high finance (Ross route). It is also common for engineers to go into consulting (another Ross route).</p>

<p>Minor in whatever you'd like.</p>

<p>The Ross -> high finance route is best paying. </p>

<p>Good pieces on MBA admissions -- </p>

<p>For the Financier: <a href="http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/positioning-yourself-for-business-school-part-1-the-financier/%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/positioning-yourself-for-business-school-part-1-the-financier/&lt;/a>
For the Non-Financier: <a href="http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/positioning-yourself-for-business-school-part-2-the-non-financier/%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/positioning-yourself-for-business-school-part-2-the-non-financier/&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>A lot of college-age kids have this idea that they "want to eventually get an MBA." I believe that this is a slightly misguided goal. If you want to get an MBA, then you want to enter the business world. Few students realize that it is quite simple to enter this world simply after their undergraduate studies, particularly if you attend a target school (like Ross). My recommendation, since it seems like you are interested in business (=are rethinking the engineering route + claim you want to get an MBA), is to try to get into Ross, learn more about the different fields in the business world, and go for those jobs. If you find yourself needing an MBA to advance your career down the line, by all means go for it. The above applies if you definitely want to get a job in business.</p>

<p>*Very tough to attain, obviously, but are extremes of what MBA programs would be impressed with + companies UM students go to work for after college.</p>

<p>You can't minor in Industrial Engineering, unless they let you make up your own minor...</p>

<p>I've always been told that Engineering + MBA is a great combo. I don't know if majoring in Engineering helps you for getting into business school in any way (infact, I doubt it), but having a major in engineering is good. And then as well, if **** happens, you have something to fall back on.</p>

<p>I thought an undergrad engineering degree is required for engineering graduate school.</p>

<p>^I wasn't thinking when I posed. That "you for getting into engineering school" should have read "you for getting into business school."</p>

<p>Oh, yea that's a more logical statement. A particular major should not make or break your admission, all else equal.</p>

<p>(Good Game 1 so far.)</p>

<p>@giants92</p>

<p>Those article links were very helpful!</p>

<p>And I intend to do investment banking or consulting job after my undergrad.</p>

<p>I guess Ross is the most logical and obvious choice for me! But I can't straight away get in Ross so I guess first I should apply for Econ in my college app.</p>

<p>MBB and Morgan Stanley are like my dream jobs.</p>

<p>Ross is certainly the most logical choice if you want IB or MBB.</p>

<p>
[quote]
But I can't straight away get in Ross

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yes you can. Check out Preferred</a> Admission - Stephen M. Ross School of Business</p>

<p>@giants92</p>

<p>No you can't!</p>

<p>The link explicitly states that:
Preferred Admission applicants must receive an offer of summer or fall admission to the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; the College of Engineering; the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance; or the School of Art and Design by May 1, 2010.</p>

<p>You can only enroll in Ross in your sophomore year if you complete all the criteria in the freshman year.</p>

<p>Basically, if you get into Ross preferred admission you're in. If you don't meet the freshman requirements as a preferred Ross admit, you shouldn't be in Ross.</p>

<p>Are you a senior? If so, did you not get accepted before May 1st or did you not know about the preferred admit option?</p>

<p>I think he means you can't be in Ross as a freshman, and in that case he is correct. But that's not how it works anyways.</p>

<p>Yes I meant what Recharge said and I forgot that it does not work that way!</p>

<p>No I am a junior. I'd be applying this November(EA)!</p>

<p>Ok, I don't understand your problem then... you're going to apply for preferred admit but you don't know what to apply for to enter LSA? You don't "apply" for a major -- you can indicate which major you intend to study (this is where you can indicate economics), but it doesn't matter.</p>

<p>No this wasn't a problem per se, it was more like me making my mind up about what I want to do.
And yes I was unsure of my LSA choice which now I am settled on Economics!</p>