Minority College Admissions Soar During Recession

<p>"Four-year colleges, community colleges and trade schools have reported a six-percent increase in the number of freshman applications from the fall of 2007 to the fall of 2008. The increase is being driven by minority students...The numbers show Hispanics accounted for most of the growth with college enrollment up 15-percent. Black enrollments were up eight-percent, Asians six-percent..."</p>

<p>Minority</a> College Admissions Soar During Recession - OzarksFirst.com</p>

<p>Mmm... I'm not sure why - but this seems odd to me. Why would this occur? [Disclaimer: Didn't read entire study]</p>

<p><a href="http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/757-college-enrollment.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/757-college-enrollment.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>1- 29% increase in Hispanic Estimated Recent High School Completers from 2008 vs 2007 compatred with 0% increase Blacks , 2% increase Whites.</p>

<p>2-Full-time freshman enrollment increased 11% at two-year colleges from 2007 to 2008. This compares with a 4% at four-year colleges and universities.</p>

<p>3-University of Phoenix-Online Campus Arizona increase 30,759 freshman enrollment ,American Intercontinental University Online Illinois increase 10,678 freshman enrollment account for a large portion Of the 144,000 increase in freshman enrollment.</p>

<p>4-Of the 144,000 increase in freshman enrollment, 35% (about 50,000) was in the state of California.</p>

<p>5-Of the 144,000 increase in freshman enrollment, about 72,000
occurred at just 109 colleges and universities, so less than 2% of the nation’s colleges and universities accommodated half of the enrollment boom.Looks like online college and California 2year colleges.</p>

<p>So the increase in enrollment appears to be mostly , online students , 2 yr college students , and California colleges.The increase in Hispanic enrollment can be attributed to increase in number of Hispanic High School graduates , not an increase in admit rates.</p>

<p>Interesting study , but misleading headline.</p>

<p>Interesting. I wonder if this applies to other minorities as well.</p>

<p>
[quote]
29% increase in Hispanic Estimated Recent High School Completers from 2008 vs 2007

[/quote]

What suddenly changed to account for this number? It seems like a ridiculously large change in only a single year.</p>

<p>They don't get into the big high school completers change - btw, it includes GED's and covers ages 16-24. It seems to be highly related to the size of the high school class, which is the largest ever, and that relates back in time to the increase in Hispanic Americans in the general population. For all I know, maybe more people are identifying now as Hispanic too.</p>

<p>The college enrollment figures aren't as impressively large. Hispanic enrollees went up 15%, compared to black 8%. The literal numbers are 40k more Hispanic enrollees, which is the same numerical increase for white enrollees though that percentage increase is only 3%. The increase is about 10k more than the increase in black enrollees and there are still more black kids in college than Hispanics. In other words, Hispanic enrollment has had a low base. That explains a lot.</p>

<p>Completely misleading headline on this thread</p>

<p>iam asylee my staus is pending i finsh my mbf from usa i apid all by my self
but not easy for me to pay agian by msy self again
is it possible to get my master free or by the loan rember iam legal in usa but iam asylee is pending please help me ilove education</p>

<p>Keep in mind that these numbers are relatively small, so changes can seem huge, hence the title. A lot of this can be placed on the recession itself. If there are fewer employers looking to hire, students continue their schooling instead of doing nothing. </p>

<p>Other explanations:
[quote]
Some of this minority enrollment surge is a simple byproduct of demographic change. In a nation whose population of youths is far more diverse than its population of adults, each new year brings a slightly larger share of minority teenagers into the pool of potential college freshmen. In addition, the first year of the recession was a time when young Hispanics, in particular, were completing high school at record rates. According to Census Bureau surveys, the Hispanic high school completion rate reached an all-time high in October 2008 at 70%.2 This was up 2.5 percentage points over October 2007 -- a larger increase than for any other racial or ethnic group.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Minorities seemed significantly price conscientious or "costs-aware". They are in the majority at 2 year colleges and community colleges. For those intending to go to a 4 year college, there was plenty of attention paid to URMs this year. There's never a guarantee about getting any form of scholarship or FA package, but being an Hispanic was considered a "hook".</p>

<p>I am not clear on this hispanic situation. If a hispanic applies do they make allowances for lower grades or is it that if they have the same grades they will be the preferred candidate. I hear various answers but does anyone know the anser for sure? Also, if a school is looking for hispanics to increase their "diversity" will they offer merit awards or other incentives to come to their school.</p>

<p>unfortunately they allow less-qualified minorities in over more highly qualified white/asian/indian students. it's not just used to break ties.</p>

<p>I've heard that as a rumor but have never found anyone in an admissions position who will say that it isn't just a tie breaker but they will admit them with lower scores to build their diversity. How do you know that as fact? Do you know if they will offer a Hispanic merit money or awards to entice them to come?</p>

<p>They can't officially say that "we will take less qualified students because of their skin color" but it does happen if you look at some admission decisions posts.</p>

<p>I love being a URM :)</p>

<p>makes getting in easier for me! :) j/k.</p>

<p>People like eastafrobeauty sooooo lucky. Jealous</p>

<p>its called affirmative action..... Duhhh. oh yeah, they took that out of history books</p>

<p>Actually, it's more like a 127,000 increase in California this year is what the demand is, but there will only be an actual increase of 50,000 since California's Community colleges don't have the money to take that many students since money to the community colleges is being capped.</p>

<p>For example, where I live, the current enrollment at the local community college is over 13,000; but the state only provides funds for the first 11,365 students at the school. For this reason, the school will be trying to cut enrollment in order to save somewhere between $2 million and $4 million this coming year. (They get $4,565 per student at this community college for the first 11,365 students).</p>

<p>Jesus Christ I always dislike these threads.</p>

<p>I am not clear on this hispanic situation. If a hispanic applies do they make allowances for lower grades or is it that if they have the same grades they will be the preferred candidate. I hear various answers but does anyone know the anser for sure? Also, if a school is looking for hispanics to increase their "diversity" will they offer merit awards or other incentives to come to their school.</p>

<p>What it means is that universities and colleges have realized the disadvantages that ethnic minority students face in American society, and in an effort to increase diversity in their classes and mitigate some of the inequalities, they take a more holistic view to admissions. They don't admit "less qualified" students as there's no evidence that the ethnic minority students do any worse than their white and Asian counterparts once they're there. They may admit students with lower standardized test scores overall, but that's only one measure of admission and it happens because African Americans and Hispanics, on average, score lower on standardized tests than their white and Asian counterparts (even accounting for income differences). Lower scores on the SAT doesn't mean "less-qualified."</p>