More Critical Reading Questions!

<p>Hey guys! I have some more critical reading questions which I need help with!</p>

<p>(italicized=designated lines and non-italicized=context)</p>

<p>Please give an answer and the explanation for why the answer is correct and why the other options are incorrect. Thanks in advance!</p>

<ol>
<li> The author’s reference to “his trusty guardian” (line 53) suggests that the</li>
</ol>

<p>a) child is obliged to find comfort in an inanimate object
b) child is fascinated by sparkling images
c) child respects Juanita more than he respects his father
d) father is more reliable than he appears to be
e) father has always considered his child’s happiness before his own</p>

<p>
[quote]
“Stand just there, by your father,” Juanita says. The boy moves stiffly to the left, never taking his eyes from the camera in her hands. “Close, now.” He inches his left foot out, and brings his right up to join it. Then he ducks his head to avoid the stabbing rays of the sun but still keeps his eyes firmly fixed on the camera, as though it is the only presence here besides himself, its twinkling eye his trusty guardian.

[/quote]
</p>

<ol>
<li> The assumption in Clarke’s Law (lines 71-74) is that </li>
</ol>

<p>a) if an experiment is repeated often enough it will prove or disprove a hypothesis to the extent that the results are identical in every case
b) it is unlikely that those who have devoted their lives to the study of a particular science can imagine possibilities that run counter to their experience
c) scientific discoveries grow not so much out of lives and careers of individual scientists as out of the spirit of the age
d) scientists who are embroiled in a controversy are less likely to make valid deductions than an impartial observer would be
e) works of science fiction are often useful in predicting the future course of scientific progress</p>

<p>
[quote]
There had been so many embarrassments of this type that about midcentury Arthur C. Clarke came out with a guideline for avoiding them, which he termed Clarke’s Law: “When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.”

[/quote]
</p>

<ol>
<li> The phrase “her actual condition was pure upstart” in line 88 indicates that Joan</li>
</ol>

<p>a) behaved spontaneously and optimistically
b) defied conventional strategies of warfare
c) was unaware of what was expected of her
d) was not a member of the elite
e) used illegal mean to achieve her ends</p>

<p>
[quote]
She had an unbounded and quite unconcealed contempt for official opinion, judgment, and authority. Had she been a sage and monarch, her pretensions and proceedings would have been trying to the official mind. As her actual condition was pure upstart, there were only two opinions about her. One was that she was miraculous: the other, that she was unbearable.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Once again, thanks in advance!</p>

<p>I would say #3 is D because the text says that "had she been a sage and monarch..." which means that she wasn't a member of the elite. And D says exactly that.
Choice A can't be right since nowhere in the text did it say that she was spontaneously or optimistic.
Choice B and E has the same problem. No where in the text did it mention conventional strategies of warfare or illegal means.</p>

<p>I got:
1. A- It's the only reasonable or supportable answer; he obviously doesn't feel comfortable around his father so he is forced (obliged) to find comfort in the camera. Nothing is said about him respecting Juanita, so it shouldn't be C. This is a tough one to answer without the rest of the passage to use for context.</p>

<ol>
<li><p>B. It talks about distinguished and elderly scientists and then talks about them refusing the possibility of something.
A. Nothing is said about experiments or results
C. No mention of the spirit of the age or anything implying it in the passage.
D. Nothing is said about any controversy, making this answer unsupportable.
E. No mention of science fiction whatsoever.</p></li>
<li><p>D-upstart means she sort of came out of nowhere, implying she wasn't an aristocrat-type, which is well supported by the passage
A-This doesn't relate to the second half of the sentence
B-lolwhat
C-She was 'unconcealed' about her attitudes, so it's unlikely that she was 'unaware' of the things she did related to those attitudes
E-Not related to the second half of the sentence</p></li>
</ol>

<p>Oh ok! Thanks guys!</p>