most gay students?

<p>What are the colleges with the highest percent of gay students? (that I could get in to)
SAT CR 640
SAT M 600
SAT W 610
GPA UW 3.4
any help?
looking for small-medium colleges</p>

<p>need more gpa info, rank, courses, etc.</p>

<p>try for any LAC or urban campus would have alot of gay guys i'd presume</p>

<p>as for an actual rank of most gay students i wouldn't know. on princeton review there's a "most queer friendly" list though</p>

<p>PR's list is only compiled by asking students one question.</p>

<p>I take a mix of regular HS courses (my school doesn't offer honors) and dual enrollment
my school doesn't rank
looking for Northeast or Mid-Atlantic, but also north carolina and ohio</p>

<p>still the schools on Princeton Review have a lot of gay students, so that's not a bad place to start your research</p>

<p>you probably won't find many schools in the south to be honest</p>

<p>^^^ Here's the PR list. Mostly LACs. BTW, Hampshire has the only openly gay college president of whom I know:</p>

<p>NYU
Stanford
New College of Florida
Swarthmore
Emerson
Simon's Rock of Bard College
Prescott
Wellesley
Marlboro
Mt. Holyoke
Bennington
Olin
Macalester
Hampshire
Grinnell
Warren Wilson
Reed
Smith
Pitzer
Vassar</p>

<p>Biddy Martin-UW Madison is gay.</p>

<p>Sarah Lawrence College and Seattle University have large gay populations.</p>

<p>

Unlike the percentage of, say, Jewish students, you're not going to find the percentage of LGBT students at a school posted online anywhere. Partly this is because a lot of LGBT students don't bother taking advantage of the ally groups or LGBT centers on campus, and partly this is because a considerable percentage of them (a majority, at many colleges) aren't out.</p>

<p>The PR list is of very limited use. It is from self-reported data by mostly heterosexual students.</p>

<p>This book is a bit old but still the best available. Your local library may well have a copy.
Amazon.com:</a> The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students (9781555838577): Shane L. Windmeyer: Books
The</a> Advocate college guide for LGBT students (Book, 2006) [WorldCat.org]</p>

<p>Also check out the Campus Climate Index website.
Campus</a> Pride: Find Your Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Friendly College or University</p>

<p>It would also be helpful to see which colleges offer an LGBT center.
Consortium</a> : Directory</p>

<p>gadad, I believe you meant Bard College in your post #6 (as opposed to Simon's Rock). Simon's Rock is an "early college" for high school students, and I think the OP is looking for post-high school LACs.</p>

<p>^^^ No, actually PR cites Simon's Rock. SR has an early college (meaning those students transfer out after completing joint HS/college credits), but it also grants baccalaureate degrees to students who enter early. But either way, as posted above, all these listing of "gay-friendly" campuses don't really answer the OPs question of "most" gay students. Frankly, if you estimate the percentage of the population that is gay to be around 6%, then there should be a lot more gay students at any large university than at the LACs in the PR list.</p>

<p>Go to a queer friendly school in a city. That's your best bet given you want a small school.</p>

<p>well you'll definitely find the most gay students at a large university but that percentage is going to be lower. Besides, you probably won't know everybody anyways. In my opinion, percentage is more important than quantity if you want a gay friendly campus.</p>

<p>

I strongly disagree. In this day and age, you're going to be hard-pressed to find a college that is NOT gay friendly. I'm currently attending a public university in the deep South that accepts nearly anyone with a pulse, and it's perfectly fine to be openly gay here. I would withdraw this statement for trans people, however, as they often need or want services that are not available at every LAC or university (e.g. gender-neutral restrooms).</p>

<p>The raw number of LGBT students is much more important in my book. You'll find that most of them do in fact know each other, even at large universities. Using my above example, the LGBT community at UNC is very tight-knit, and I know a hefty chunk of LGBT students at my current university as well as some at a couple local colleges. (This is at a university with 15,000 undergrads in a metro area of over 1 million people, I should add). </p>

<p>I agree with kvilledeac. These might work:</p>

<p>[ul][<em>]American
[</em>]Clark
[<em>]Emerson (highly specialized)
[</em>]Eugene Lang
[<em>]Goucher
[</em>]GWU (slight reach)
[li]Sarah Lawrence (easy access to but not actually in a major city)[/ul]</p>[/li]
<p>[ul][<em>]Hampshire might also work, as it's part of a consortium with Amherst and U Mass.
[</em>]It's not nearly as urban, but Ithaca might work as well. With Cornell in the area, there is a critical mass of students.
[*]Duquesne, Providence, and Villanova fit your criteria, but many LGBT students prefer to avoid Catholic colleges. Each of them has several other colleges in the area (U Pitt, Point Park, Carnegie Mellon for Duquesne; Brown and RISD for Providence; Penn, Haverford, Swat, and others for Villanova).[/ul]</p>

<p>hmm I definitely shouldn't have phrased it as "gay-friendly" but I mean a place where it feels like a lot of the students are gay.</p>

<p>You have some very good points though.</p>

<p>Vassar and Wesleyan come to mind</p>

<p>San Francisco State U</p>

<p>my favorite college professor teaches at the City College Of San Francisco hahaha</p>

<p>just kidding, but he seems pretty cool from the videos we've watched in HS physics classes: YouTube</a> - DEMO: Conservation of angular momentum</p>

<p>That guy's video series pretty much taught my physics class lol. My teacher is trying to get him to speak at my school next year.</p>

<p>The common phrase at Yale is "One in four, maybe more".</p>