Most math intensive engineering major

<p>What is the most math intensive engineering major. I was thinking electrical but im not sure.</p>

<p>I would say either applied mechanics or ece.</p>

<p>stop saying "applied mechanics"</p>

<p>What is the correct term? Theoretical and applied mechnaics? Engineering Mechanics?</p>

<p>I think Nuclear Engineering because of the use of quantum mechanics</p>

<p>"What is the correct term? Theoretical and applied mechnaics? Engineering Mechanics?"</p>

<p>I guess the major would be mechanical engineering. You're sounding like some 19th century physicist or something...just sayin</p>

<p>Mechanics is definetly not the same as mechnical engineering, typically up until the junior year classes are similar but from then on they are largely different majors.</p>

<p>really? i didnt know there was a separate mechanics major. Do you know a school that offers it so i can check it out?</p>

<p>edit: seems like a grad program</p>

<p>Sure, i am currently a senior in the program at UIUC, i'm not sure how many other colleges have a mechanics department but i think there are 30 or so. You can check out <a href="http://www.mechse.uiuc.edu%5B/url%5D"&gt;www.mechse.uiuc.edu&lt;/a> for a lot of info on both M.E. and mechanics.</p>

<p>how do you like it?</p>

<p>Not many have an Engineering Mechanics program, also sometimes called applied mechanics or theoretical and applied mechanics, and the program is sometimes part of the mechanical engineering department although the majors are different (I have also seen it as part of the civil engineering department). Three that I can think of that have it are UIUC, Wisconsin, and Va Tech. You do take some additional math and some upper level engineering courses heavy in math (and often the same courses are taken by grad students). Some colleges also have engineering physics or engineering science majors (usually with a physics bent where you take some additional math but also a lot of additional physics.</p>

<p>Electrical Engineering is very math intensive - only once you hit the junior year of classes (AKA the core classes). Freshman-Sophomore years are easy... not very math intensive. Once you hit a course that talks about Signals and Systems, you'll be in math heaven :)</p>

<p>how do you like it?</p>

<p>I enjoy it a lot, i think the program is excellent. You can choose your own secondary field in mechanics, solids, fluids, materials, mathematics, bio-mechanics, experimnetal mechanics, computational mechanics..... You also get to choose your own senior design electives. It's a pretty flexible program if you know what you would like to do. The 400 level classes can be challenging initially, you do see quite a few graduate students from other departments in them as drsuba said. It's a really good degree if you would like to get into research or teach, it also prepares you very well for grad school. I would probably go with mechanical engineering however if you're not looking to go into grad school; i don't think it is as practical as an undergraduate degree by itself when compared to a M.E. degree. Here's a list of classes offered if you're interested into looking into it, <a href="http://courses.uiuc.edu/cis/catalog/urbana/2008/Fall/TAM/index.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://courses.uiuc.edu/cis/catalog/urbana/2008/Fall/TAM/index.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>off the bat, i want to say electrical on the whole. at least at my school, EEs take the most math courses, up to Fourier Analysis and PDEs (a 400 level class). then after that, subjects like electromagnetics, signals, quantum computing, etc. all rely heavily on mathematics at that level.</p>

<p>"off the bat, i want to say electrical on the whole. at least at my school, EEs take the most math courses, up to Fourier Analysis and PDEs (a 400 level class). then after that, subjects like electromagnetics, signals, quantum computing, etc. all rely heavily on mathematics at that level."</p>

<p>plus the whole area of discrete math that other majors dont really have to deal with</p>

<p>id go for Nuclear.</p>

<p>I'd say EE.</p>

<p>Nuke followed by ECE.</p>

<p>Lots of nuke engineers getting close to retirement, and plans for new nuke design/construction are already underway.</p>

<p>.... really?</p>

<p>Theoretical physics and mathematics strictly speaking, is pretty much a number language.</p>

<p>Thats probably the most math intensive course you would take in your life.</p>

<p>Nuclear Physics is another</p>

<p>Electrical Engineering yah obviously.</p>

<p>But Theoretical Physics and mathematics is well, in my opinion, more math because your going to defy lots of common math and physics theories and it isnt going to be straightforward learning (like logical stuff in nuclear physics and electrical engineering)</p>

<p>By the way, theoretical physics led into the idea of nuclear physics... so therefore they made it a separate major because they defined multiple theories and principles already from the theory part... do you catch what im saying? LOTS MORE MATH IN THEORETICAL MATH AND PHYSICS MAN lol trust me....</p>