my son got expelled....will colleges rescind him??

<p>Ditto on this being a troll.</p>

<p>How many seniors have that many acceptances - and from the schools that were listed - in DECEMBER???? Other than ED, decisions come out in the SPRING.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Purdue, SCU, BU, and Rice.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I can answer the question about acceptances.</p>

<p>Purdue, I believe, has rolling admissions.</p>

<p>SCU sent out EA decisions on December 15.</p>

<p>Rice sent out ED decisions on December 15.</p>

<p>BU sent out ED decisions on December 15 but the poster has since said (both he and his mom) that he really didn't get accepted to BU.</p>

<p>What I find hard to believe...this poster now claims he is a 16 year old high school SENIOR who got accepted ED to Rice. Sorry, I don't buy it.</p>

<p>Someone could post a link to the 2 threads bobster started on this topic over on the Rice forum, as I believe the Rice admissions folks read it.....</p>

<p>Yea this is a troll, but he can be 16 and a senior. His 17th birthday could be in the end of December.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Yea this is a troll, but he can be 16 and a senior. His 17th birthday could be in the end of December.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yes that is true...and that would make him one of the youngest kids in his high school graduation class. A gap year sounds like a good plan to build some maturity.</p>

<p>Both of my older kids had fall birthdays when they applied for college (from Sept-November)</p>

<p>As will my daughter next year. </p>

<p>It's not that uncommon.</p>

<p>It is uncommon to hijack other people's passwords and usernames and is a breach. Not cool.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I'm curoius at what he "learnt" too. What is "learnt"?
I am really hoping he has learned from this incident.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Learnt is OK, e.g.
[quote]
v. learned also learnt (lûrnt), learn·ing, learns
v.tr.
1. To gain knowledge, comprehension, or mastery of through experience or study.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>What is 'curoius '?</p>

<p>"Learnt" is more common amongst the Brits or Canadians. More likely to be seen as a possible misspelling by folks in the 50 states. One site I looked at gave several examples of other irregular verbs that could have similar alternative spellings, including several that I have never seen used (some at the bottom of this list -- spelt? spilt? spoilt?):</p>

<p>burned, burnt
dreamed, dreamt
kneeled, knelt
leaned, leant
leaped, leapt
spelled, spelt
spilled, spilt
spoiled, spoilt </p>

<p>Also found clapped/clapt. Never heard of that alternative spelling either.</p>

<p>Now, as for typos like "curoius" -- I am very familiar with those!!</p>

<p>This directly from verb2verb website.</p>

<p>Conjugations of the English verb learn can be found below. To conjugate any other English or French verb you can use the verb2verbe engine in the left-hand column. To help you learn this verb you should test yourself on its conjugation. Do this by clicking on the orange test button above. Indicative
Present Perfect<br>
I learn<br>
you learn<br>
he learns<br>
we learn<br>
they learn<br>
I have learned<br>
you have learned<br>
he has learned<br>
we have learned<br>
they have learned </p>

<p>Past Pluperfect<br>
I learned<br>
you learned<br>
he learned<br>
we learned<br>
they learned<br>
I had learned<br>
you had learned<br>
he had learned<br>
we had learned<br>
they had learned </p>

<p>Future Future perfect<br>
I will learn<br>
you will learn<br>
he will learn<br>
we will learn<br>
they will learn<br>
I will have learned
you will have learned
he will have learned
we will have learned
they will have learned </p>

<p>Imperative
Present<br>
learn!<br>
let's learn! </p>

<p>Conditional
Present Perfect<br>
I would learn<br>
you would learn<br>
he would learn<br>
we would learn<br>
they would learn<br>
I would have learned
you would have learned
he would have learned
we would have learned
they would have learned </p>

<p>Conjunctive
Present Perfect<br>
I learn<br>
you learn<br>
he learn<br>
we learn<br>
they learn<br>
I have learned<br>
you have learned<br>
he have learned<br>
we have learned<br>
they have learned </p>

<p>Past Pluperfect<br>
I learned<br>
you learned<br>
he learned<br>
we learned<br>
they learned<br>
I had learned<br>
you had learned<br>
he had learned<br>
we had learned<br>
they had learned </p>

<p>Jym was very kind in the explanation about "American English"; and separating that from an obvious typo. I may have been wrong assuming the Op was an American. This website can be accessed anywhere in the world, and I should have added a qualifier on how we conjugate here in the U.S.</p>

<p>I personally have had this experience with one of my wonderful children. He pulled his stupidity 6 weeks before graduation and had a full list of school acceptances. He wrote to each school and explained the situation. Only one college contacted his school and asked for details and I guess supporting information. His college counselor was most supportive. We had discussed all of this before writing to the schools and she helped him with his letters. He, and your son, too, are not the first fools to pull this sort of stuff. The colleges get a number of these situations each year. In my son's case, out of the 12 acceptances, non of them rescinded their offers and, as I stated, only one asked for corroborating information.</p>

<p>His partner in crime had an ED acceptance to HPY. His admissions was deferred a year--I don't know if the family, school, college insisted on it, but he had some deeper issues involved than my son did that truly needed to be addressed. It was not clear how deeply my son was involved in the situation or whether he was pretty much a bystander. Some years later, I've learned that he was more deeply involved than he admitted at the time, but still not to the level of his friend.</p>

<p>Even though he could have been just unlucky and the situation just one of those things, I made him go to a a summer program and do community service. Any blip on behavior and he was going to have to sit out a year of college. He stayed out of trouble, went to college and graduated in 4 years and has been fine since.</p>

<p>The other young man graduated a year later after doing his "time" and is doing well. But both boys and their families (especially one mom, I can guarantee you) had a very rough 4-5 months. It really just about killed me. </p>

<p>I would not be as concerned about the college acceptances as I would be about the state of mind your son has that he would do these sort of things to jeopardize his transition to more independence. Kids go a bit nuts during these years and when they are in that haze they will continue to do destructive things. Intervention and consequences are important to get it through some thick heads that some things are not worth the risks involved.</p>

<p>Some of my friends who study physiology and education have pointed out that until our dear children turn 25 or so, their brains are less than ideally equipped to process responsible longer term behavior. They simply have just not physically matured. While I don't recommend it as an excuse, it does seem to explain some puzzling behavior. </p>

<p>This is despite the academic accomplishments.</p>

<p>I do find it hard to believe that someone accepted ED to Rice would have such poor grammar, spelling, and punctuation...</p>

<p>Just saying I'm a senior and I only turned 17 a few days ago...</p>