Need some help! HS Soph needs online class

<p>Hi All - Looks like our HS D may have to take French 3 off campus this year due to a scheduling conflict with Literary Magazine. She needs this class this year in order to take IB classes her junior year. I need to hear some options and points to consider. I'm assuming online would be the simplest way, if so, which sites should I start with? thanks!</p>

<p>Keystone National High School has French 1, 2, 3, 4 and AP French! The course starts at $289. Here's the website. </p>

<p><a href="http://www.keystoneschoolonline.com%5B/url%5D"&gt;www.keystoneschoolonline.com&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>My d moved soph year and continued her Chinese online. We are in Michigan so the first year she was in the Michigan Virtual High School - there were several non-Michigan students in her class (including someone she had gone to school with in China who also moved back to the US). Junior year she had to find someplace else because MVHS only offered Chinese 3 at the time so she went with CTY online through Johns Hopkins. Much more expensive ($900 vs $250 a semester), a bit more organized but not any more challenging than MVHS. Both are fully accredited. </p>

<p>World</a> Languages</p>

<p>You might also see whether she could attend Concordia Language Villages next summer for high school credit. The high school credit session is 4 weeks long.</p>

<p>My daughter attended the two week sessions twice and the 4 week high school credit session once. She always went to the Bemidji Lac du Bois site.</p>

<p>OP: Have you talked with her guidance dept? Many states now offer an online class component through their state dept. of education, especially those with significant rural areas?</p>

<p>I agree with mathinokc - If your high school would accept the "One Year of HS Credit" that Concordia Language Villages offers for a four-week French immersion (in Minnesota) high school credit course, that would be a good way to do get that extra year of French.</p>

<p>We tried Keystone and it is more for homeschoolers, without the kind off graded structure that our school required. There were tests at the end, as I remember, but the rest of the work was self-tested.</p>

<p>We used Virtual High School, which our high school has now joined and to which our school now offers 25 slots to students who want enrichment or who have schedule conflicts. VHS work is done each week, so that everyone is doing the same work at the same time, and discussions are pretty lively with kids all over the country, even the world.</p>

<p>We also used Aventa Learning. Aventa requires that work be finished for the term by a certain date, but not each week, so it worked well for kids with health problems, for instance, or students who perform and have some weeks when they are busy and other weeks when they can get a lot done.</p>

<p>Both these programs were under an umbrella organization, Educere, at [url=<a href="http://www.educere.net%5DEducere%5B/url"&gt;http://www.educere.net]Educere[/url&lt;/a&gt;],
which also includes many other online programs. Most have French 3 and other levels as well, including AP.</p>

<p>Other options are community college classes, on campus or online, or, with permission, other colleges' offerings as appropriate.</p>

<p>This is the one our state uses: K12</a> | Online Public School, Online High School, Online Private School, Homeschooling, and Online Courses options</p>

<p>You can use the drop down menu to select your state. For us, it would be free.</p>

<p>ETA: Oops. It's only free for K-8.</p>

<p>There is an NC Virtual H.S. My friend's S took Latin through it for the past two years because his charter school doesn't offer Latin.</p>

<p>Son used Florida Virtual School for Latin lasy year. Went well, cist was about $700 for the year if I remember correctly. I agree with one of the earlier posters that mny states are starting virtual schools. I would suggest looking into that as the cost would be much less if you are in state. If there is not one offered for your state, you will need to check with your local district to see what scholastic affiliation they require.</p>

<p>Thanks for the help! I did check online with NC Virtual School and they only offer French l & ll. I'm planning on talking with guidance this week, but I wanted to be prepared with info going in. I will continue to check the links provided. Appreciate the help.</p>

<p>Does your daughter plan to apply to a very selective college? If not then your plan for some alternative to a traditional in-class course should work out. But if she's planning to apply to very selective colleges, my sense is that your D's priorities are not properly aligned. A mid-level language course requires constant conversational practice with constant feedback. In some cases on-line language courses may work, but its hard to imagine how that would be the case for French 3. With that perspective, prioritizing an EC above a core course is not a very good idea. There must be some way to participate in the literary magazine without compromising coursework within the context that your high school provides.</p>

<p>Good point, fogcity. There are NO very selective colleges on her horizon. She is a good (not over-the-top stellar) student and the only sophomore selected for Lit Mag. She was told by the advisor she'd be in line for editor her senior year. It will be something she loves.</p>

<p>Can she do a dual enrollment through your local cc? Otherwise, I'd second Keystone or the Virtual HS (VA has one too and so do many states). cc/de would be the most ideal on transcript. What state are you located in? I just found out about local language courses through our cc that are de is why I ask (I found one for my daughter in Japanese and taught on Sat. mornings!).</p>

<p>And daughter did take Japanese for credit at Concordia in MN this summer.</p>

<p>I think the EC could be more important than taking French 3 in the classroom, or even at all. For the daughter's future, and for college admissions.</p>

<p>Virtual High School is international and not a state school, just to clarify. That is one of the pluses: discussions involve kids from around the country and the world.</p>

<p>My son took a few on-line classes through BYU Independent study. It doesn't look like they have French III, but they may be able to refer you to alternate:</p>

<p><a href="http://ce.byu.edu/is/site/courses/highschool%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://ce.byu.edu/is/site/courses/highschool&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>I don't think that all virtual schools are alike. When I was looking for my d's Chinese class I proposed Virginia's virtual school but it was not accredited so our high school in Michigan would not accept it. (specifically we were looking at Virtual Virginia). Something to investigate with whatever program you pick. </p>

<p>info on MIVHS accreditation: [url=<a href="http://www.mivhs.org/AboutUs/Accreditation/tabid/287/Default.aspx%5DAccreditation%5B/url"&gt;http://www.mivhs.org/AboutUs/Accreditation/tabid/287/Default.aspx]Accreditation[/url&lt;/a&gt;]&lt;/p>