No Job After Graduation

<p>So I happen to read this article, The</a> Great Recession's lost generation - May. 17, 2011, on cnn.com and no surprise, job placement amoung graduates is tough these days. But what did surprise me were the comments following the article, many of which blamed the fact that the minority pictured could not find a job was because she wasn't qualified to be at Princeton. How readers were able to reach this conclusion with absolutely no other information is quite miraculous or the other choice word I'm thinking of at the moment. </p>

<p>But what I really began to wonder is what if the picture of the Princeton grad had been say, white, or asian, or hispanic? Would that matter?</p>

<p>I obviously had way too much time, because I went through 8 pages of comments, with nary a single word mentioning, "many of which blamed the fact that the minority pictured could not find a job was because she wasn't qualified to be at Princeton. How readers were able to reach this conclusion with absolutely no other information." </p>

<p>Too bored to go through the rest, but you can obviously find idiotic comments everywhere on the internet. And you can decide to focus on the ones you choose (that is, if they really exist in a substantial way after this article).</p>

<p>Obviously she didn't get a job teaching because qualified teachers are getting laid off like crazy. It doesn't seem like much of a surprise that even ivy leaguers are getting shut out of where there is no new employment. She should widen her range to other professional jobs like everybody else....and even then, people are still struggling. From top schools to the bottom, it's difficult for many.</p>

<ol>
<li><p>With the possible exception of one comment that got removed, which may have met the OP's description, no comment suggests that the woman in the picture was not qualified to go to Princeton.</p></li>
<li><p>It has to be relevant in her case that Princeton doesn't offer a degree that actually qualifies anyone to be a teacher, and is completely outside the normal networks through which people with teaching degrees get teaching jobs (except for something like Teach For America). In a hot market for teachers, that might not be a problem, but with school districts nationwide, and in every type of community, cutting back on teachers, if you are not in some network (including TFA) you are not going to be getting a job.</p></li>
</ol>

<p>Sorry @busdriver. I assure you the comments existed and I did not make them up. Like you, I definitely don't have time for that. When I read the article earlier this morning the first landing page had a few comments that left me wondering what was going on here. I obviously didn't consider that anyone reading after me would not see the same comments I was reading following the article. I actually agree with you completely. I think many graduates are finding themselves competing for the few new jobs out there and many of them are having a heck of a time.</p>

<p>What I was referring to were comments like the ones below which are now buried (where they belong) farther down the thread.</p>

<p>"It was planned that way...wasnt it!! As our citizens graduate with horrendous debt, they are forced to take the low paying jobs (which is usually reserved for the poor)..in order to survive and keep good credit. Meanwhile, while graduates are taking the lower paying position, the illegals and foreigners are taking the others!! There is nothing else to think about or conversate about..it is just that simple. It was all planned this way and the..."</p>

<p>OR THIS...</p>

<p>"A contributing factor is that due to the fact that we have lowered the standards and requirements for entrance and acceptance into colleges and universities, we have an over abundance of graduates who never would have qualified for college if were not for government interference. Socialism seeks to "level the palying field" - but this is the reality when you do so - everyone has a degree, everyone is "equal" - so why should I..."</p>

<p>@JHS. Again I agree, teaching does not have great job prospects right now. It's not the article I disagree with. It was the comments that followed after I read it.</p>

<p>Not trying to be argumentative, here, Amaz. But unless you clipped out alot of verbiage from the two comments that you quoted, neither of them validate your statement of: </p>

<p>"many of which blamed the fact that the minority pictured could not find a job was because she wasn't qualified to be at Princeton."</p>

<p>They do not appear to be addressing the individual at all, but basically generic rhetoric that can be heard on many political forums (whether one agrees or disagrees). Unless you left out some critical parts, nothing in those two comments appears to be aimed at the pictured individual at all.</p>

<p>At the end of the article, she says she is having a hard time explaining the gap in her resume for the past couple of years.</p>

<p>I don't think that makes much sense. If it is true that an employer, after the recent cataclysmic unemployment rates for college grads, is asking about that gap, then the employer is an idiot. IMO.</p>

<p>That's what I was thinking poetgrl--if ever there were a time when a long period of unemployment or underemployment would not have to be explained, it would be now (and the Great Depression).</p>

<p>@busdriver I am totally ok with someone disagreeing with me. Its fine if they didn't bother you. The reason I was bothered by the comments is quite simple (at least in my own head). I read the article and in general sympathized with the young students interviewed. Finding work once you're degreed isn't as easy as it used to be.</p>

<p>Then I read about 5 or 6 comments that followed. 3 of those IMO made assumptions that the lack of job opportunities was due to minorities, immigrants, and affirmative<br>
action. I don't know if the affirmative action comment was deleted or I couldn't find it. Since the young woman pictured is a minority I asked myself and I guess CC readers if the photo was of a person of a different race would these individuals still argue that the lack of job opportunities was due to affirmative action (if the photo was white) or unqualified students (if the photo was asian), etc. </p>

<p>I linked those comments to the photo. Perhaps making huge assumptions and taking certain liberties. But in my head I said here's a photo of a black Princeton grad who can't find work in her field and someone out there thinks its due to college standards being lowered. I wondered aloud or online in this case if the photo was the driving factor for the comments. Because the article itself didn't support what was said.</p>

<p>BTW to the two individuals who commented about the resume gap. I volunteer at a job training program and I assure you from the applicants point of view being unemployed carries a stigma. Even seasoned workers are embarrassed and often ashamed they can't find work and wonder "is something wrong with me", "why can't I find a job", "why did they choose me to lay off". They ask all the time what they should say if asked about being unemployed.</p>

<p>I think that it is human nature to want to take something from someone else. Hence, someone who is currently employed always looks a little better than someone who isn't.</p>

<p>no offense but why would you ever go to Princeton to get a degree to be a teacher? if you want to be a teacher, it is better to go to public schools with specialization in education.</p>

<p>Go to a University in the area you want to teach in. Prestige means little in educational hiring in my experience.</p>

<p>Local University ties and student teacher experiences in local districts make the big difference in hiring.</p>

<p>it is a brutal market for teachers. Most grads will need to substitute teach for a few years to work their way into a system they want to be in. Only good news is there are quite a few looming retirements in the next few years. Assuming state pensions, Social Security, and Medicare don't blow up and people put off retirement.</p>

<p>emory83:#11 Because it might be cheaper (no loans) or free at Princeton. ;)</p>

<p>My daughter's urban high school had teachers from Yale, Cornell, one did a year at Oxford and then Columbia teacher's college. Some loved teaching and getting a good education, going to a state school just for getting a teaching degree wasn't what they wanted (and Ivies tend to give good FA) In some situations, they said it was actually cheaper.
One History teacher did find his Yale degree a fast track to promotions and now is head of a History department in another school.
There can be many reasons for wanting to be a teacher and I think the more enriching your education, the better you can be in some situations.</p>

<p>Or the History teacher was very good at teaching and fast tracked himself to the promotion. Not hard to find grads from many schools who quickly worked their way up to head of a department.</p>

<p>Plus many state schools provide an excellent education not just for getting a teaching degree. A bit of a bias there.</p>

<p>
[quote]
BTW to the two individuals who commented about the resume gap. I volunteer at a job training program and I assure you from the applicants point of view being unemployed carries a stigma. Even seasoned workers are embarrassed and often ashamed they can't find work and wonder "is something wrong with me", "why can't I find a job", "why did they choose me to lay off". They ask all the time what they should say if asked about being unemployed.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>In some fields like computer programming and IT, if you're out of the industry (or not in school) for too long employers may be concerned that your knowledge is outdated. In such cases, a gap in employment might be a cause for concern.</p>

<p>This thread has a pretty silly premise. Is there anyone who is unaware that there are morons out there that will make those types of comments on news stories on the web? Is there any reason why it makes sense to repeat them (and give them more attention) out here?</p>

<p>drizzit, I didn't mean that in any way, many fine teachers come from state schools and they have more programs for them...what I meant was they wouldn't turn down the opportunities to go to those other schools just because they wanted to teach. Usually if the cost is the same or better, it makes it easier.
That history teacher was good, but not a "favorite" among students, a bit dry and not the most engaging, but he got the job done and was involved with Yale for programs for the students which helped a lot. Those contacts being close and an alumni were a bit easier but could have been done by someone else I'm sure, just a little more work.</p>

<p>I just hate how teaching is always thought of as something that isn't that important or how/where. That bias is strong. I have met over the years many other teachers that went to top universities (public and private)and although they hear the "why teach?" many times, they just smile and do their jobs.</p>