northwestern vs. wellesley

<p>i'm really having a hard time deciding where to go for college - northwestern or wellesley. i wrote down some pro/cons for each school (some of them might be bad generalizations or things i've heard w/ no backing, i apologize for those). if anyone can offer me any feedback at all, i'd reaaaaaaally appreciate it. thanks!</p>

<p>Northwestern
+good resources
+is a university, so not so geared towards humanities (?) wider range of opportunities/options for classes, etc
+can take classes at other colleges at northwestern, not just college of arts and science
+co-ed
+good student body size (7-8K undergrad, 3-4K for arts/science)
+far from home
+sporty school
+Chicago/Evanston
+pretty campus
+freshman seminars (15 ppl max, teacher becomes ur advisor for freshman year)
+better school?
+more of the typical "college experience"?
-quarter system
-weather=windy
-arts/science not as good as journalism/theatre (how much worse?...)
-far from homeĀ… travel expenses</p>

<p>Wellesley
+can take classes at MIT
+smaller classes
+better relationship with professors
+sisterhood
+sent me lots of letters after acceptance (this isnt really a factor lol)
+a lot of ppl I know
+more well known in the east?
+great networking/feeder school
+closer to home
+semester system
+college town
-bad reputation among MIT ppl?
-small school
-hilly and empty campus
-liberal arts = humanities?
-no boys
-closer to home</p>

<p>i have no clue what i want from a college (large/small, university/LAC, etc) which makes it infinitely harder to decide. im interested in math/science (maybe not enough to make a career out of it) so i'm considering something like working with kids/non profit (although that doesnt exactly make you a lot of money, and we all need money ;P)</p>

<p>visited both, did an overnight at wellesley. i wasnt really feeling wellesley until i met my hostess, then after i met her and interacted more with the kids i liked it a lot more. at first it was like whoa so many girls but then i got more used to it and it doesnt bother me THAT much. northwestern overnights booked too fast, so all i could do was a tour, and the campus is def. prettier than wellesleys, but i dont know how i'll like the people or the whole atmosphere (but it IS coed). i feel like wellesley is a safer choice b/c i know more about it, but northwestern has a better social life so it might be more of the "college experience." ack i dont know, ultimately i feel like it comes down do safety vs. risk, social life/college experience vs. the rest of my life (supposedly if u graduate from wellesley u are set for life w/ the networking and everything...dunno about the northwestern networking/feeder school situation). how well known is either school in the working world?</p>

<p>sorry for blabbering but i keep going back and forth and it really is driving me nuts. feedback please? gracias.</p>

<p>Evanston is like the altimate college town. The weather is not very windy and the reason chicago is called the "windy city" is not because of actual wind.</p>

<p>help please?</p>

<p>Evanston is more of a college town than Wellesley; I passed by Wellesley few times because I knew this family in Needham. The strip of downtown Wellesley look expensive and kinda boring. It's probably less diverse also. Also if I am not mistaken, Wellesley is very known pretty much in New England. Northwestern is more known everywhere else.</p>

<p>It depends if you want the experience/ learning experience which comes from sharing dorms/classes and virtually everything else with male college students and also having an incredible diverse array of students in all fields at Northwestern. From engineering students, to music students, to actors, to shared events in the thousands (basketball, Dillo Day, football, women's lacrosse) to journalists, to film makers, to 6'5" 300 pound football players wanting to share your food and of course many graduate students. The downside of Northwestern compared to Wellesley, well, boys acting slly. The two are very different. Ultimitely, it comes down to what you want to get out of your four years of college.</p>