Not so well-known college

<p>How many of you have been accepted or plan applying to ivy-league or prestigious public law schools from a not so well-known college?Does anyone worry that the law school they came from will limit thier career opportunities, like you ever want to run for public office?</p>

<p>Law schools generally don't care where you went to college. All they really care about are your GPA, LSAT score, and race.</p>

<p>^ Ha, that's no joke. People always talk about how GPA and LSATs are the only factors law school admissions officials care about, but race is pretty huge. It's true that undergrad institutions, extracurriculars, and other softs aren't that important, but I recently started looking at the stats of under-represented minorities who were accepted into law school, and it is just a ridiculous advantage to be certain races. A Native American, Latino, or African-American can go so far with so little effort these days. Asians and White people get the screw job on this one.</p>

<p>Yea those minorities. Just stealing jobs without any effort. Ew.</p>

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Yea those minorities. Just stealing jobs without any effort. Ew.

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<p>Getting a 3.8 at a state university and a 160 on the LSAT doesn't require much effort. But that's enough to get a black student into a T14 school with a scholarship.</p>

<p>Not to mention that any non-retarded black student can go to Howard Law School (TTT) and get a BigLaw job.</p>

<p>I'm pretty scared if this is the kind of people we have trying to get into law school! Just what we need - another racist, spoiled brat.</p>

<p>Sillymilly - First of all, you've got to be kidding. Spoiled brats? This from the woman who contemplates buying her daughter, a college sr. (that's right a senior in COLLEGE), a limo for New Year's Eve to keep her from driving drunk. Also, a woman whose son totals a car, and covers her son in paying for the damage. Worry about pulling your own kids off your tits before you call others spoiled.</p>

<p>I signed up for the military during a time of war to pay for college. Basically, I went to war to get money for college. Not a dime paid for my college by my parents. I don't consider myself very spoiled.</p>

<p>Second of all, It's not racist because URMs do gain a significant advantage in the admissions process. All of my friends are Mexicans, and they always joke about it when they're applying for programs because they were spoiled growing up. Their parents paid their whole undergrad tuition, paid for their cars, and paid for their housing. They revel in their advantage, and I don't blame them because I would would be taking full advantage as well. One of my friends right now is banking on it for a prestigious PhD program he admits he would not be able to get into if he were not an URM. Not that his grades are bad, but they're a reach for top programs in his major. Not until recently, when I actually saw the numbers on lawschoolnumbers, did I realize the size of the advantage.</p>

<p>I don't think anyone is arguing that no advantage exists. That would be stupid. If you're trying to make a substantive point, you need to take a critical look at WHY that advantage exists.</p>

<p>So all of your friends are rich Mexicans? Well, I am a poor Mexican, and all of my friends are poor Mexicans, and I attend a private university. I don't know what you're talking about, and you likely don't either.</p>

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I don't think anyone is arguing that no advantage exists. That would be stupid.

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<p>You'd be surprised by the number of people who refuse to admit that affirmative action works the way it does. Many people continue to believe that affirmative action only gives URMs a small boost and vehemently deny that black students effectively receive 10 point LSAT boosts just for being black.</p>

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If you're trying to make a substantive point, you need to take a critical look at WHY that advantage exists.

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<p>I know why affirmative action exists: colleges think racial diversity is important in a student body. I also know why colleges think racial diversity is important in a student body: they're deluded.</p>

<p>Complaining on the forums isn't going to fix anything. Life is not fair. Deal with it, 60 years ago whites had the advantage. I would also think that diversity in a community is a good thing because more than likely you will deal with them in your lifetime and you won't say ignorant comments about them. No one likes to be the center of hate.</p>

<p>As transfers2010 points out, affirmative action is to promote diversity. When you have to force the issue of diversity by lowering the bar so very low to achieve your target goal then you are pretty much sacrificing the integrity of your program. The problem is affirmative action for the purpose of diversity results in reverse discrimination, as seen in the cases of Bakke v. UC Davis Medical school, then I think U.Michigan law school had another case that used Bakke as precedent. Basically, reverse discrimination was deemed acceptable in the interest of the benefits of diversity. But what are the educational benefits of diversity? seriously? are they worth sacrificing the educational benefits of having peers who are the most qualified students? At the level of post-graduate programs you really are ****ing with people's lives here. Every single student should earn their way in based on equally evaluated academic merit or at least reign in the gap by allowing equally qualified URMs preference over non-URMs.</p>

<p>I haven't seen a gap of 10 points on the lsat, but from what I've seen 5+ for URMs is common. Not to take anything away from the URMs who do have stellar numbers, which is a good amount.</p>

<p>My point with my rich friends was that, first of all they have no diversity to offer. They have no real culture to contribute. They don't speak Spanish, they came from a predominately white neighborhood, and they do not practice any kind of latino culture, yet they still will receive such a boost. There is no real point in promoting diversity when there is no real cultural cross-over between the students. Second of all, most of them were still offered scholarships for their ethnicity at some point in their academic career.</p>

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60 years ago whites had the advantage.

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<p>Do you have any evidence for this claim? Are you suggesting that elite schools used to reject qualified black applicants? I find that hard to believe because even today, top schools cannot find qualified black applicants. If they don't exist today, why would they have existed 60 years ago?</p>

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I would also think that diversity in a community is a good thing because more than likely you will deal with them in your lifetime and you won't say ignorant comments about them.

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<p>Little research has been done on the putative benefits of racial diversity. You'd think that American institutions would had objectively determined that diversity was a universal good before embarking on their crusade to ensure it at any cost.</p>

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Life is not fair.

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<p>I hate when people say this. Obviously, some things in life aren't fair, but that doesn't mean that we should just accept injustices.</p>

<p>transfers2010, if you need to brush up on your World/U.S. History so badly that I need to explain to you how thousands of years of racism and hundreds of years of imperialism effectively put whites and non-whites on unequal footing, then you may not even belong in the law school applicant pool. Do you really lack the ability to be critical this much? Do you really think there is no chain of causality between generations of history and where we are today? Does every passing day occur in a vacuum? Jeez.</p>

<p>Forget about diversity. Let's talk about the minority students that aren't outlier exceptions like your friends. I'm sure that since they're your friends, and that you're clearly white, that I'm about as close as you've gotten to interacting with a Hispanic who is not white-washed, not rich, first-generation HS grad, first-generation college student, from a single-mother household, from a neighborhood you wouldn't even find yourself driving through. Let me tell you, I don't have many white friends. Not because I'm anti-social or prejudice (like you) but because people are attracted to like-minded people, and, like you and I, absolutely can not relate. I am much more indicative of the URM group that law schools target. My friends are too. Your friends are not. With the types of views that you have, this is no surprise.</p>

<p>Also, we don't need scientific research to know that we live in a pluralistic world that is being shrunk by technology. When people cluster and form strong, strictly provincial views, they forget about other views, are quick to reject them, and people become intolerant. This is wrong. This is obsolete. Not because the way of the world should be everyone holding hands and singing songs or something. It's because intolerance leads to violence, injustice, ignorance, a lack of empathy for people who are not like you. </p>

<p>We're just trying for success in the right way: an education. And we even get crap for that? URMs get a boost because without it, we'd be much worse off. I'll tell you what research DOES show: that if you and I had the same degree, you'd still go much further than me. Yeah, your admissions prospects are worse than mine, and you'll be at a disadvantage for 4-7 years. Sorry, but I can't empathize when apparently I'll be at a disadvantage for the next 40 years.</p>