Only half of Philadelphia high school students graduate in four years

<p><a href="http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/15792608.htm%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/15792608.htm&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>This is a link to a story in today's Philadelphia Inquirer about the dropout crisis in Philadelphia public schools. Only about half graduate in four years, and, in some sub-groups, the graduating rate is even lower, below 40%.</p>

<p>We CC parents tend to be so focused on ensuring that every aspect of our kids' educations is ideal that we may lose sight of the fact that many kids are not even getting the bare basics of a high school education. The findings provided in this article are shocking and distressing to me, although I am not sure exactly what the best approach to improve the situation would be.</p>

<p>This was an impressive article. It's apparently based on past and forthcoming articles generated by a long-term Johns Hopkins study, including a lot of longitudinal data on individual kids which very few studies ever capture.</p>

<p>Some of the highlights I remember:</p>

<p>-- 90% of kids who fail either math or English in 8th grade wind up dropping out of high school
-- 90% of kids in juvenile justice facilities fail to graduate on time
-- 70% of girls who give birth during high school fail to graduate on time
-- about 64% of kids graduate within 6 years of starting high school (vs. 52% within four years)
-- 4-year graduation rates for Hispanic boys are under 40%
-- almost all the students who drop out want to drop back in, but programs for returning students are extremely oversubscribed</p>

<p>More welfare and other government programs are the solution, no doubt. What a surprise.</p>

<p>Another predictable response from Citation.</p>

<p>Actually, I thought the predictable response was going to be "Vouchers! Vouchers! Vouchers!" This is one area where the conservative mainstream loves government handouts.</p>

<p>(The Inquirer article didn't go into it much, but the individual stories it sidebarred do suggest that charter schools and specialized schools can have an important role in keeping kids in school. I'll be interested in seeing what the Hopkins researchers have to say.)</p>

<p>Less than half graduate from high school in the largest city in the tenth "smartest state"?
<a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showthread.php?t=250558%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/showthread.php?t=250558&lt;/a>
Hmmm.</p>

<p>Mayor Street has more important things on his mind than kids' education in the city or the homicide rate which since January '06 is the highest in the nation. Right now his biggest priority is: banning smoking. He and his cronies have destroyed a city that was coming back. And neither can I stand Rendell for endorsing him in the first place.</p>

<p>Maybe giving birth AFTER graduating from high school - might be wiser</p>