Opinions on these math professors?

<p>Does anyone have any previous experience with either Williams, M.B , Duncan A.R , or Ma. J in any type of math class?</p>

<p>Thanks</p>

<p>^You don't need a teacher for math. Just read the textbook, do the toughest problems in the textbook, and know the theorems by heart and have them ready in your mind and at your fingertips (be ready to exploit them on the midterms if necessary). I've had good and crap professors (Martin was the worst for me, but he was a good teacher but painful lecturer), but I've been able to ace all my math classes just by following the procedure that I just explained.</p>

<p>And please, to everyone who wants to do well in math courses (or in any other science/eng course in general). Do not abuse the discipline by memorizing the formulas and hoping that you'll get a good grade. Learn it how math was meant to be learned. Understand and appreciate the derivations, do the toughest problems in the book so that you can understand how powerful these theorems can be.</p>

<p>Good Luck, math is awesome.</p>

<p>^ like </p>

<p>:)</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
And please, to everyone who wants to do well in math courses (or in any other science/eng course in general). Do not abuse the discipline by memorizing the formulas and hoping that you'll get a good grade. Learn it how math was meant to be learned. Understand and appreciate the derivations, do the toughest problems in the book so that you can understand how powerful these theorems can be.

[/QUOTE]

I agree with this. I also recommend taking the same approach in Physics classes. Professors come up with so many different tricks on exams to present something that's just different enough from what could have been memorized. It really differentiates who "gets" the material.</p>

<p>@Fizast and Grapesoda:
But how do you determine which book problems are the hardest for both Calculus and Physics?</p>

<p>
[quote]
But how do you determine which book problems are the hardest for both Calculus and Physics?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>They are the ones labeled with a star before the problem.</p>

<p>Well in my multivariable calc book, they had the harder problems towards the end of each section, and they had the impossible problems in the this special section called "problems plus". But I think authors usually like to put the harder problems towards the end.</p>