Opting Out of Brown PLME?

<p>Most of the 7 or 8-year BA/MD programs allow you to opt out after the four undergraduate years and apply to a different medical school. I'm pretty sure that Brown also used to do this. However, I just ran across this on the PLME website...</p>

<p>*PLME students have the option to apply to other medical schools. In doing so, they will be withdrawn from the position being held for them in the Alpert Medical School (AMS). However, they will have the option of applying to AMS via the standard (AMCAS) route, in which case their application will be considered alongside other standard route applicants. Individuals are asked to notify the PLME Office of their intent to “apply out” by September 15 of their senior year, or by September 15 of each year they are on deferral. Students should know that the Office of the Associate Dean of the College for Health and Law Careers will provide the PLME with the names of PLME students applying to other medical schools at the start of each academic year.</p>

<p>Like all other prospective applicants, PLME Students planning to apply to other medical schools must attend one of the group information sessions offered in the Fall Term by the Associate Dean of the College for Health and Law Careers. *</p>

<p>Brown</a> University: Program in Liberal Medical Education</p>

<p>So based on my understanding of the above, PLME students can not apply to other medical schools without giving up their guaranteed admissions at Alpert Medical School anymore? Can someone clarify? Thanks</p>

<p>It is Brown's policy, but it's also a brand-new policy that is the source of outrage amongst PLME students.</p>

<p>Whether the policy will survive the next school year is unsure. </p>

<p>Apply assuming it stands, though, just in case.</p>

<p>No, the reason it caused outrage amongst PLMEs was because they applied under the impression that they could apply out. However, typically only a few do each year, and it really doesn't make sense for the med school to keep allowing that while holding their spot. The new rule means that the spots in Brown's medical school will be (for the class of 2014) reserved for the people who want to be at Brown the most, rather than those who have figured out how to game the system the best.</p>

<p>What chsowlflax17 said. The "outrage" from the current PLMEs stems from the fact that they enrolled into the program without having the applying out restriction in place, and some of them may have based their decision to enroll on this "flexibility". So in a sense by wanting to apply this rule retroactively, Brown is in a way not keeping to its end of the bargain.</p>

<p>But from the Class of 2014 onwards this rule is explicitly stated at the point of application, so it's absolutely a fair game. Furthermore I don't see the need for Brown to accommodate those who want to have their cake and eat it too.</p>

<p>I agree with Brown's right to uphold the new policy. I was just noting that it was unpopular last academic year when it was publicized.</p>

<p>I was planning on using the Brown medical school PLME as a safety option and just aim for the higher schools like Harvard and Stanford med, but I guess that's not an option now. A binding PLME program basically makes you stay in Providence for 8 years then, even if you end up not liking the area too much...</p>

<p>Are any other BA/MD programs doing this, or is Brown the only one so far?</p>

<p>^You don't have to stay...if you don't want to. The new system is the cap the number of people who are trying to game the system, such as the way you just mentioned above. If you want to apply to Harvard and Stanford as a PLME student, you're free to do so.</p>

<p>I would never do that.</p>

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I was planning on using the Brown medical school PLME as a safety option and just aim for the higher schools like Harvard and Stanford med, but I guess that's not an option now. A binding PLME program basically makes you stay in Providence for 8 years then, even if you end up not liking the area too much...

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<p>Ha, the new policy was instituted specifically for people like you.</p>