ORFE v. Econ for I-Banking

<p>The title says it all, which program at Princeton will best prepare you for placement in Wall St. and give you the most opportunity for advancement.</p>

<p>From my understanding, the Econ program is more liberal arts based but allows you to take more courses in finance. The Operations Research / Financial Engineering program is largely based in statistics and requires higher level probability and computer science classes. Is it geared more towards quants?</p>

<p>I was originally planning on doing ChemE with a certificate in finance, as I thought the subject matter was very interesting, but I couldn't pass up the opportunity to study in one of Princeton's specialty areas.</p>

<p>Both will get you into ibanking. It is easier to get into ibanking from Econ because it's also an easier major (hence better chances of getting a high GPA). A 3.6 Econ is viewed as the same as a 3.6 ORFE.</p>

<p>If you want to target more quant-based/trading opportunities, however, ORFE will often have the slight edge in most companies, mostly because it requires more quantitative mindset. But the differences are minimal at best. Both majors will get you an interview, and it really depends whether you'll be able to answer the brainteasers from there to land a job in trading/quant jobs.</p>

<p>I say major in what you like best. ChemE + finance looks like a very attractive major. You don't necessarily have to do ORFE, although knowing some of the material that ORFE teaches you such as Black Scholes will help in interviews. But you can also learn the same stuff in Econ.</p>

<p>Point is, going to Princeton is a signal to employers that you're smart. You'll be able to get an interview regardless, especially if ur econ/ORFE/chemE. Do what interests you, but most importantly, get a good GPA. A good GPA from Princeton opens up tons of opportunities for you.</p>

<p>that was an informative response, thanks!</p>

<p>
[quote]
Both will get you into ibanking. It is easier to get into ibanking from Econ because it's also an easier major (hence better chances of getting a high GPA). A 3.6 Econ is viewed as the same as a 3.6 ORFE.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>QFT. FermatABC is right on.</p>

<p>For that matter, a 3.6 in history along with quantitative course work, work/extracurricular that show interest in finance, and other leadership is a pretty good start for banking.</p>

<p>One other tip (from someone going into finance after graduation): be wary of coming into Princeton with a blinding certainty about a career in banking. Thinking about your four years as a linear path to a career can be dangerous to someone seeking to maximize on the rewards of their Princeton years. Princeton is a special place precisely because it is an exceptionally low-risk environment (i.e. a protective bubble) for exploration and going off the beaten path. Remember - you're really never going to have as much of a chance in the future to try random things without facing big consequences when it comes to your employability or pocketbook.</p>

<p>Good luck!</p>

<p>I want to go into the finance world, wall street, etc. I am really good at math (like Olympiad level math), do you think I should do ORFE because of that? Or should I go for Economics to get a better GPA? In the end, I want to be making big $$$, like the rest of us. :P</p>

<p>Money should never, ever, be the sole motivation for pursuing a career. You have to be passionate about the field or you will not succeed, no matter how smart you are.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Money should never, ever, be the sole motivation for pursuing a career. You have to be passionate about the field or you will not succeed, no matter how smart you are.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Uh huh, and we must all be loving, compassionate human beings to find true happiness, like in those Disney movies.</p>

<p>If you're extremely good at math, I'd suggest either math-track Econ (basically the same as being a math major) or ORFE: take a couple of classes and see which style you prefer. Econ's more scientific, ORFE is more engineeering-like. If you're really good at math and you come to Princeton, I guarantee that you'll be making big $$ as soon as you graduate.</p>

<p>Hey Randombetch, I'm a pton student too, but I never really understood the point of taking math-track econ. Your degree still says "A.B. Economics," right? With the exception that the coursework ECO310, 311, and 312 read "blah: A Mathematical Approach"</p>

<p>
[Quote]
Money should never, ever, be the sole motivation for pursuing a career. You have to be passionate about the field or you will not succeed, no matter how smart you are.

[/Quote]

Ah, idealism, how pleasant it sounds.</p>

<p>platorepublic's post is quite ironic actually, as wall st. careers are dedicated to making money</p>

<p>if i'm wrong, then bankers developed mortgage backed securities and derivatives just for ****s and giggles....i think not</p>

<p>That's not what I meant though. Notice, I said sole motivation - that does not mean it cannot be one of many motivations. Of course you go to Wall Street to make money. Of course I, like everyone else, love money. But, what I was saying is that you have to be passionate about making money, passionate about the stock market, and very competitive to give you the drive to really strike it rich out there. Because if you are not passionate, the next guy will be and he will stay up 19 hours a day doing research on his/her portfolio, even though he/she does not have to, and he/she will leave you in the dust. You have to actually like your job to be great at it. Steven Cohen, Ichan, Asness, Buffett, Griffin, and all the rest of them were and are passionate about thier jobs, that's key. If you ever get very wealthy, you'll come to realize that money is nothing more than points on a score-board between very driven men. All money shows is who is closer to The Truth, to Alpha, that's it.</p>

<p>Is passionate about money not synonymous with wanting to make a lot of money? You pretty much refuted your own statement there lol.</p>

<p>^Haha I agree with Jersey.</p>

<p>Hey Fermat - yeah that's totally true (and that's why I'm NOT doing the math-track Econ), most people just do it for the finance certificate. But if you're that good at math, I see no reason why not to do the math-track. It definitely proves you're good at quantitative economics though.</p>