People with grades in the high 90's

<p>Something has been confusing me for a while. My school calculates GPA as follows:</p>

<p>4.0 = A- or A
3.0 = B- B or B+
etc.</p>

<p>I know some schools do not give GPA (my first questions is why the heck would they not?) but instead give a number grade (e.g. 90).</p>

<p>At my school, no one even thinks of getting 95+ in most classes; A- is a lot more common than A. Yet, I see people on here complaining about getting 92s or 93s or 94s. When I first saw that I was like lolwut? My second question is, how can people (even though this is CC) get 95+ in almost all subjects? At my school, a 98 or 99 is almost unheard of. Secondly, why is getting less than 95 bad?</p>

<p>I honestly don't know how things work at schools that use numbers rather than letters for grades.</p>

<p>Their schools are much easier than ours.</p>

<p>In a class of 90 for an AP Euro teacher, we had like less than 5 above a 95.</p>

<p>In their schools, its like half of everyone.</p>

<p>At my school, it was like that:
97-100 = 4.0
95-97 = 3.8
93-95 = 3.6</p>

<p>Then our grades were:
100-93 = A
85-92 = B
77-84 = C
70-76 = D
70- = F</p>

<p>Very rarely did students get above a 97 in a class as a final grade, although some did.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Their schools are much easier than ours.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Or maybe we're smarter.</p>

<p>The ways schools calculate grades vary. My school is highly competitive, and 99 averages are achievable. I have a 98 3-year average. An A would be considered around a 94 or higher, a B the high 80s - low 90s, and so on. A 75 is the lowest passing grade.</p>

<p>At my school you're lucky if you get a 92/93. A few people get 96-ish or higher in a subject or 2. higher than that is almost unheard of.</p>

<p>My school tries it very best to keep the number of A's to a minimum. I think they even [ one my teacher accidentally slipped and said ] have quotas to the number of A's [ like a certain percentage ].</p>

<p>At my school, we had plus grades instead of minus grades. So it went A+, A, B+, B, etc. If you wanted the A+, you needed a 96 or higher class semester average.</p>

<p>I wouldn't say that we had rampant grade inflation, but having a perfect GPA for the semester wasn't impossible. Our valedictorian had straight A+s five out of eight semesters, with the other three being As. But he had the highest GPA our school's seen in the last like eight years.</p>

<p>My assumption is that the schools that use number grades have easier classes. I seriously do not imagine any person in the history of my school get a 95+ for a 3 year, let along the entire high school, average.</p>

<p>Oh I forgot to mention:</p>

<p>A or A- = 90-100%
B- or B or B+ = 80-89%
etc.</p>

<p>at my school</p>

<p>Well, a friend of mine used to go to Catholic private schools and she said that a cutoff for an A was a 93. However, that was in elementary school but I would imagine that the grading scale would be something similar for high school. She's easily one of the smartest people in the class so I doubt that their grading scale reflects their intelligence.</p>

<p>The way colleges grade is </p>

<p>A+, A = 4.0
A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3
B = 3.0</p>

<p>Most highschools count A+ as 4.3 though.</p>

<p>Many of the contributors here have SAT and ACT scores in the 99th percentile or above; if only one-in-one-hundred students makes an "A" in a given course, it's probably such a student.</p>

<p>
[quote]
At my school, a 98 or 99 is almost unheard of.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>The students who get into top schools are those who earn these "unheard of" 98's and 99's. I've earned two grades of 100, and two 99's--I'm not sure how many 98's. It's quite simple really, work hard and be a standard deviation or two above any other student your teacher's ever had.</p>

<p>Eh, in most Latin classes I expected to have above a 95. In Art History (and some other social studies classes), having below a 97 or 96 was upsetting to me. It's not that those classes, or my school, is easy in general. Those were just the classes where I usually (in Art Hist, always) had the highest grade and cared to keep it that way. I don't know anyone who can get such high grades in all f their classes for 4 years + 8th grade geometry, and since my school makes all A's 4.0, no one has to.</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
The students who get into top schools are those who earn these "unheard of" 98's and 99's. I've earned two grades of 100, and two 99's--I'm not sure how many 98's. It's quite simple really, work hard and be a standard deviation or two above any other student your teacher's ever had.

[/QUOTE]
</p>

<p>Does the high school transcript include the number grade? Or just the letter grade? Or both?</p>

<p>
[quote]
Does the high school transcript include the number grade? Or just the letter grade? Or both?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Ours includes the number grade, and our GPA makes no sense. I think we should just do letter grades, though.</p>

<p>My school</p>

<p>90-100 A
87-89 - B+
86-80 B
79-77 C+
76 - 70 C
69 - 67 D+
66-60 D
59- ... F</p>

<p>All my grades were above a 95+, except for Comparative gov't. I got an 89.4 probably, which was super close to having my continuous straight A Streak. I'm a failure.</p>

<p>I've wondered about this sometimes. I think part of it is when a 92 and a 95 count the same, there's less motivation to get every last point.</p>

<p>^ People at my school cry if they don't get 95s</p>

<p>People at my school are also discouraged by the low 90s. But we don't do the A+/A- thing. 90-100 is an A. 80-89 is a B, etc.</p>

<p>
[quote]
The way colleges grade is</p>

<p>A+, A = 4.0
A- = 3.7
B+ = 3.3
B = 3.0

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That's not totally true. Georgia Tech is A = 4 B = 3 C = 2 D = 1 F = 0. Add 'em up and divide by the number of courses.</p>