PetE and questions in regards

<p>Hi everyone,</p>

<p>I have read thru the threads on this major. I do have a couple of questions that I have not found answers to. The first one being in regards to internships. Specifically, when are PetE students available to intern? Can you get a internship in your very first summer? I know that oppurtunities will depend on several factors, gpa for example. Well, lets say a student with a +3.5 gpa, would said student have internship opportunities his first summer? If not, when? </p>

<p>Secondly, once graduated, I would like to work overseas. From the other threads I have gathered that several factors also come into play here. With some companies not offering said opportunities to first year grads. So what companies will? Being that certain companies recruit from certain areas/schools, what schools would better position me for said opportunities? I am also fluent in Spanish and French, will this help me land a position overseas? </p>

<p>Thanks</p>

<p>There are no restrictions on internships, I've met someone that got an internship through BP the summer before college. Certain companies(i.e. Anadarko) also have specific internships just for freshman.</p>

<p>I've been to ~25-30 company information sessions and I've never been told it is possible to begin your assignment overseas. You can, however, end up overseas after 3-5 years.</p>

<p>Thanks for the reply noleguy33. One of the dilemmas, if we can call it that, that I am currently facing is as follows, I have the option of a full ride at a local 2 year. The goal would then be to transfer out to either Texas(UT or TAMU) or Alaska. However, if I where to go this route, I would be foregoing two possible internships. Well at least field based internships. Right? Would it be advisable to do one over the other?</p>

<p>I would get to the university as fast as possible and try not to miss those internships.</p>

<p>I would go for the internships as well. The internships alone ($$$) may be more valuable than your scholarship to the 2 year college, and the work experience will set you up for more prestigious internships later in your college career. Someone with internships under their belt can command a huge premium in the labor market at graduation (I've seen anywhere from 10-50% increased salary by having internships).</p>

<p>So my plan is as follows,</p>

<p>Attend the University of Alaska Fairbanks as a PetE major for two years. Hopefully land a couple of summer internships and then put in for a junior year transfer to UT. Now, maybe I am being over analytical, but would I be frowned upon by the UT transfer office/officials for any reason? Would they feel that there is no reason for me to transfer if I am already in a PetE program elsewhere? </p>

<p>My other option would be to attend an in-state uni for two years and major in mechanical or perhaps chemical engineering and then put in for a transfer to UT. I would still have the opportunity at two internships, although they won’t be in the petro industry. Would this be a viable option?</p>

<p>Any advice or comments on my 'plan' would be greatly appreciated.</p>

<p>Your second plan is far more reasonable in my opinion. The key is working hard at your state college so that you can get through UT's tough admission standards.</p>

<p>Fact: Majority of oil/gas companies do hire mechanical and chemical engineering! For servicing companies IE: Schlumberger, Baker Hughes etc..., the ratio of of chem, mechanical, civil to petroleum are 8:2 ratio. I have seen most 2nd interviews for full-time jobs are 8 guys from various engineering backgrounds and 2 guys would be straight up petroleum engineering.</p>

<p>You say you'd like to work overseas. Do you care where?</p>

<p>If you want to go to UT, I'd say get into an Austin community college that has an articulation agreement with UT.</p>

<p>
[Quote]
The first one being in regards to internships. Specifically, when are PetE students available to intern? Can you get a internship in your very first summer? I know that oppurtunities will depend on several factors, gpa for example. Well, lets say a student with a +3.5 gpa, would said student have internship opportunities his first summer? If not, when?

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</p>

<p>PetE students can intern anytime during their college career but its obviously easiest for juniors. Getting a first-year PetE internship is really difficult and is often done using networking and not through the typical application process.</p>

<p>
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So what companies will? Being that certain companies recruit from certain areas/schools, what schools would better position me for said opportunities?

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</p>

<p>International Opportunities are really expensive for companies. To invest in an intern to do international work is rare and is only offered to exemplary students. Only students from the top schools in PetE would be able to obtain these jobs.</p>

<p>Most companies allow international experiences after working 3 years on the job. This shows commitment to the company and expertise in the technical matters.</p>

<p>khoie,</p>

<p>I was aware that chem/mec/civil engineers made their way into petE, but I had no idea that they were quite as prevalent in this field as you say. The only thing that I don’t like about a petE degree, is the fact that it 'pigeon-holes' one. I really think that I would love to major in mec or civil. I am 22 years old and have been working as a mechanic since I got out of high school. So yes, I am a bit mechanically inclined, and you can probably now see why these degrees interest me. As far as petE goes, there is nothing that I would enjoy to be challenged to think and solve problems, yet at the same time be able to be out in the field and getting dirty. </p>

<p>To get back to chem/mec/civil engineers in petE, what would be the drawbacks of going this route rather than a directly pursuing a petE? It’s probably safe to assume that starting salary would take a hit. Any idea how much? Also, would this close any doors, as far as what types of roles I can take in the petro industry?</p>

<p>noimagination,</p>

<p>No, I really don’t care where I end up overseas. I mean if I could chose, Australia or perhaps somewhere in South/Central America would be at the top of the list. But let’s be honest, where ever one might end up (in this industry), it is going to be a desolate, middle of nowhere kind of place. I don’t know, I think it's the Boy Scout in me or something, that finds the thought of living on some remote oil platform a bit exciting. </p>

<p>I would think that there might not be engineers lining up to go work in the Middle East or South America, so I figured that there is a good chance for me to eventually end up there. But from what I gather, the chances of doing this right off the bat (or even within the first few years) don't seem all that likely. Right?</p>

<p>noleguy33,</p>

<p>Funny that you mention Texas community colleges as an option, as it was just last night that I was researching this option. Although, the out</p>

<p>(Not sure why my last message was cut off...)</p>

<p>of state tuition, for even just a CC in Texas, is insane!</p>

<p>J89,</p>

<p>I figured that getting a first year internship, in petE more so, will be farfetched. After all, you will only have one semester for a perspective employer to judge you on. As you can see, I added more info in regards to my situation, in specific my work experience. Would this improve my chances of landing an internship? I should also note that I have a Class A CDL and quite frankly, would have no problems ‘rough necking’ it for a summer (I believe that this is a possible option, right?).</p>

<p>I should have been clearer in my original post. I understand that most, if any, employers would be reluctant to let an intern work overseas. This is work after all, not a study abroad program. My question however, applies to overseas opportunities for a first year graduates. From your experiences, can a first year graduate, with at least a couple of internships under his belt, work overseas his first year as a full-fledged petE grad?</p>

<p>Thank you all for taking time to respond to my inquiries.</p>

<p>
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I should also note that I have a Class A CDL and quite frankly, would have no problems ‘rough necking’ it for a summer (I believe that this is a possible option, right?).

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</p>

<p>A lot of companies love students that rough neck for a semester. It brings you directly to the field and helps you learn about the Petroleum world hands-on. It will definitely help you get internships later on and its definitely feasible as a first year student</p>

<p>Having jobs before your first semester may also help but, as you noted, the PetE companies are looking for smart students and one semester of class does not make you a great engineer.</p>

<p>
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From your experiences, can a first year graduate, with at least a couple of internships under his belt, work overseas his first year as a full-fledged petE grad?

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</p>

<p>I've mainly talked to the supermajors about international experiences. They're all different in their own aspects. Here's a summary below:</p>

<p>Shell - You need to finish your rotational program and all necessary trainings (including social and cultural training) before going overseas. ~5-6 years minimum unless you are heavily specialized in a specific area.</p>

<p>Chevron - Allows for graduates to do international experiences as part of their rotational program, typically after their 2nd assignment. ~2-3 years minimum.</p>

<p>BP - Similar to Chevron.</p>

<p>ExxonMobil - I only talked to my interviewer at the time about this and he said somewhere around 3-4 years, I believe, before you can go international.</p>

<p>I posted on another thread, I'll add a little here. I'm a Pet Eng with over 30 years exp, I own an oil and gas company. Friends I went to school with are top management at Conocophillips, BP, chevron, Exxon.</p>

<p>The only reason that there are more chem/mech engineers than Pet E's,is the chronic shortage of petroleums. Also, remember, the majors have refining arms that hire chem and mech rather than pet. If you want to be pet, go pet. </p>

<p>Office internships are fine. Lovely things. Roughnecking shows your mettle. For operations and drilling, I'll always take a guy who's roughnecked a summer. Good on you for being willing. There is no better experience. If not roughnecking, try to get on a frac or cementing crew. Don't worry, you'll get plenty of time in the office later.</p>

<p>Why would you think you're ready for international right out of college? Are you really that much smarter than everyone else? If you think you are, you're wrong. This business has some very smart people.</p>

<p>International operations are much more expensive than domestic, and offshore is more expensive than land. When you're young, you'll make mistakes. That's OK, it's how you learn, but a smart oil company wants you to learn and make your mistakes on the least expensive wells, not the most expensive. If someone is willing to send you on the highest profile, most expensive stuff right out of college, you should question their sanity.</p>

<p>I hope this helps, at least a little. Good Luck!</p>