Physics/Economics double major

<p>How's this combo?
I'm very interested in both fields and I am a top-top student in both fields. I go to an elite school(best in the country) where I had a special schedule where I could both pursue A level business related subjects AND A level Physics as the only student in the country.
I would like to pursue both fields of study, I don't want to narrow myself down and I am genuinely interested and passionate about both aspects. I'm the kind of guy who is infinitely curious.
I don't know the general consensus and folk view on this issue.
Is this too hard to pull of? How's it like? Will it magnify my future options a lot?</p>

<p>ummm.....why?</p>

<p>Well, I don't know the exact circumstances of this kind of educational choice.</p>

<p>But my thoughts are that I don't want to simply narrow myself down so much, I want to know as much as possible, on a high level.
It's an idea though, I am here to get to know about the practical circumstances of picking a Physics/Economics double major and figure if it's the best thing to do.</p>

<p>People wonder why you would choose 2 vastly different majors, because they aren't job-related. A big reason for that I might do this is because I heard that if you graduate from college with a Physics or Engineering degree, you're competitive for business-related jobs. I want to take advantage of the flexibility in the US system.</p>

<p>Still, it's just a consideration that I want to check out.</p>

<p>My daughter is studying physics at Harvard so I can confirm that investment banks/financial firms do like to hire from that pool. She was getting invitations to interview for summer internships as a freshman. Those firms recognize that physics students have strong analytical skills that are applicable to finance. I think only about half of Harvard's physics students go on to grad school in physics and finance is the leading field for those that stop at their bachelor's degree.</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
But my thoughts are that I don't want to simply narrow myself down so much, I want to know as much as possible, on a high level.

[/QUOTE]
</p>

<p>In today's day and age, it's so much better to be excellent in one area, rather than be the "jack of all trades and the master of none". I know we'd all love to be Renaissance men, but in today's society it's just not a practical approach.</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
A big reason for that I might do this is because I heard that if you graduate from college with a Physics or Engineering degree, you're competitive for business-related jobs. I want to take advantage of the flexibility in the US system.

[/QUOTE]
</p>

<p>get an engineering degree, get a good, solid work experience, and get an MBA. That's a much better path.</p>

<p>Right. Would you rank Physics or Economics better before MBA?</p>

<p>Depends. Physics, traditionally, is heavy on math and science. Economic programs in most schools are also heavy on math but weighted towards statistics. An economics major would be better for a MBA straight out of school. But if you went to work first and then pursued a MBA the major you studied as a undergrad is really meaningless. </p>

<p>Here is my advice do what you want but if you do the double major and cannot keep above a 3.5 then it's not worth it. </p>

<p>Do a math/economics degree.</p>

<p>Study the subject that interests you and pick up some useful, practical skills along the way. Something tells me you have no idea about what you would really like to pursue.</p>