Possible to get in with a 3.7

<p>?
Let me know what you think</p>

<p>yes. it is possible even with lower.</p>

<p>a number doesn't tell us anything about the context. a 3.7 could be good, it could be bad at your school. it could be weighted or unweighted. your scale could be out of a 4.0 or a 5.0 or more.</p>

<p>in the end as much as i hate them, the chance forums with their standardized format are more helpful. </p>

<p>but to answer your simple quesiton: yes you could get in. will you? the odds are high against you and most candidates, 9 in 10 folks are denied. you need more than just a good gpa and good test scores to get in.</p>

<p>Yeah if everything else is there</p>

<p>Possible? Yes. Likely? No. When I give info sessions for my Ivy alma mater, i tell students and parents that if you're known by your teachers and administrators (yes, even the principal) as one of the top scholars this year, then you're viable: in the ball park. Doesn't have to be a 4.0 but one of the most academically aggressive learners in your year. </p>

<p>By implication, if one isn't one of the top scholars in the class, then I posit that the applicant isn't viable given today's competitive applicant pool.</p>

<p>The other caveat is if a 3.7GPA student has a particular hook (eg recruited athlete) then chances improve. Otherwise, the run of the mill 3.7 student has little to no chance.</p>

<p>What bout great extra curriculars and great essays?
I am starting my Jr year come fall with a 3.7 and 4.9</p>

<p>you do have a chance. You are not your gpa, they look for well rounded people not 4.0 gpa/6.0 hpa supergeniuses who have nothing to offer but brains.</p>

<p>3.7 is fine as long as everything else is there. College essays are pivotal if not the most important thing.</p>

<p>Assuming sort of "average" gpa calculation, something similar to what Columbia uses (A = 4.0, A- = 3.7, B+ = 3.3, etc.), 3.7 unweighted makes you eligible anywhere, will help you at most schools, won't hurt you at schools like Tufts, Chicago, Swarthmore, Amherst (to name a few), and will probably hurt you at CHYMPS, and perhaps Columbia, UPenn, Brown (but not as much). I'm at Columbia, and my unweighted might have eventually topped 3.7, but I think it settled somewhere around 3.6, really. 3.7 weighted, assuming a gpa boost on the order of +.5 for advanced classes, will hurt you somewhat, perhaps significantly.</p>

<p>However, as T26E4 said, it is far more important that you be considered one of the most talented students in your class by your counselor and teachers. If people consider you to be one of the most talented in your class and that you apply that talent well, it will almost always shine through.</p>

<p>I do theatre and I wanna go for political science.
Is it worth it?
I go to a very competitive school. I am currently 24/180
I am not the best at math so that hurts.</p>

<p>Top 13% is not very competitive for people applying to Columbia.</p>

<p>of course you do (if thats unweighted). Hell, my cousin didn't do too well yet took 11 AP's, played lacrosse from 10th - 11th grade, was decent in science research and had good SAT scores. Although his grades weren't up there, the dean was CALLING him to personally get him into columbia. If you have other qualities aside from grades that the college / admissions person sees that is truly outstanding and hard to pass on; don't worry, you're fine. It is only unlikely if you have bad SAT scores and nothing too outstanding. Reccomendations, volunteer work, and competitions / after-school activities WILL greatly increase your chances. I have more stories about not-so-smart people and ivies if you want to hear more...and all of this is 100% true :)</p>

<p>I mean im only a Soph and my GPA and rank will go up. I just want to know if its even worth it</p>

<p>
[quote]
I mean im only a Soph and my GPA and rank will go up. I just want to know if its even worth it

[/quote]
</p>

<p>In that case, summarily yes. It is completely worth it. With a 3.7 unweighted gpa coming out of your sophomore year (even more going into your sophomore year), you are well within the range of candidates that will be considered and could be accepted to Columbia. My gpa was definitely worse than that at the end of sophomore year.</p>

<p>You should work on getting into the top 10% of your class, but depending on the competitiveness of your school, that might not even be a deal-breaker (I mean, it's not a deal-breaker regardless, but I guess that I mean that the competitiveness of your school could potentially mitigate that significantly). Certainly neither a 3.7 gpa nor a 24/180 rank would prevent me, if I were you, from applying. </p>

<p>Also, as for the "not the best at math" bit, I personally think that since adcoms are focused on what kind of student you'll be, if you demonstrate decent proficiency in quantitative subjects (i.e., math and science) and above-average talent in the humanities, you have a perfectly decent shot at getting in. After all, the science requirement is only two courses. They're far more concerned with you doing well in the classes in your major.</p>

<p>Above all, just work really hard your junior year. Upward trends are always promising to adcoms. If you work hard your junior year, you will definitely have a shot (by no means guaranteed, but neither is anyone else) at Columbia or any "upper tier" university or whatever.</p>

<p>"Also, as for the "not the best at math" bit, I personally think that since adcoms are focused on what kind of student you'll be, if you demonstrate decent proficiency in quantitative subjects (i.e., math and science) and above-average talent in the humanities, you have a perfectly decent shot at getting in."</p>

<p>This is probably true so long as you're applying to college. If you're applying to SEAS and you're struggling with quantitative subjects, that's problematic.</p>

<p>Silverchris9 you are my hero. What you said I have been thinking all along and to hear it from someone else is great. I wanna go for polyisci. i love it and it is my passion. This year I took AP World.
I am getting a tutor for SAT math and I am gonna work hard for the upcoming SATs. I am not the best test taker but with hard work I think I can do it.</p>

<p>^true. bad at math + seas = small chance of success, tbh. But as long as the OP isn't interested in going to engineering schools it should be a big deal, or it doesn't have to be.</p>

<p>If I may: If you just finished your freshman year of high school, it is WAY too early to focus on these issues. Focus on what interests you, both in the classroom and outside of it (including playing outside with your friends this summer). You can focus on admissions odds a couple of long years from now. To the extent you can, set aside college thoughts and simply focus on excelling in everything you do (including building friendships while you're playing outside this summer).</p>

<p>Also, be prepared to change your mind about academic interests; political science may seem like the cat's meow right now, but you may stray about in the next several years. There's nothing wrong with that. My younger son, now a sophomore at Columbia, thought he was a physics or political science major when he applied. Now, he thinks he might be interested in philosophy or economics. I applaud him for keeping an open mind as he continues his search. You should do the same.</p>