Potential Class of 2015!!! Are you ready to RUMBLE!!!!!!!

<p>Are you ready for this?!?!?!</p>

<p>YouTube</a> - space jam - are you ready for this</p>

<p>hahahah</p>

<p>A thread of this nature already exists.</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-pennsylvania/911113-penn-2015-hopefuls-3.html#post1064930278%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-pennsylvania/911113-penn-2015-hopefuls-3.html#post1064930278&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>yes im aware of that. i just felt like posting a song to get people pumped. im not trying to find out peoples stats.</p>

<p>"why so serious?"</p>

<p>I see. That thread isn't for stats only lol, just a place for all Class of 2015 applicants to congregate</p>

<p>ok. i'll go say hi sometime</p>

<p>Alright haha.</p>

<p>you guys start early -_-</p>

<p>This is CC, would you expect anything different? :)</p>

<p>Just know you'll be torturing yourselves by getting anxious so early!</p>

<p>if so then i've been suffering since i knew i wanted to go to penn haha</p>

<p>Some advice I would give to future applicants:
You may have heard of the Schrodinger's cat paradox, but if you haven't, it goes like this:
A cat is put into a box along a bottle of poison, and radioactive substance that may or may not decay during the time the cat is in the box. If there is any radioactive decay measured in the box by a Geiger counter also located in the box, the flask of poison will be shattered, killing the cat.
During the time the cat is in the box, the lid is closed, so that we cannot observe anything that is happening inside. So how do we know during this time, if the cat is alive or dead? Since we cannot say either for certain, it is assumed that the cat is in between.
However, once the box is open, we will know for sure the fate of the cat, because it will be observed to be either alive or dead.
My point is that you think as much as you want about the fate of the cat, but once you open the box, it will be one way or the other. Probability doesn't matter anymore, it cannot change the fate of the cat.
The same is true about your application to Penn. Once you apply, it won't matter if you had a 30% chance or an 80% chance going in. You will eventually be either admitted or denied. So don't spend too much time worrying about it. Instead think about how your achievements represent you as a person.
While it's always good to think realistically and have practical goals, there has to be a point where you are willing to let go and admit to yourself that while you have done everything you can, the rest is up to chance. It's great to prepare to apply to college, excel in school, write great essays, and participate in and contribute to many activities, but don't stress too much about your odds of getting in. Believe me, it will drive you crazy!
Good luck!</p>

<p>word. well said.</p>

<p>
[Quote]
Some advice I would give to future applicants:
You may have heard of the Schrodinger's cat paradox, but if you haven't, it goes like this:
A cat is put into a box along a bottle of poison, and radioactive substance that may or may not decay during the time the cat is in the box. If there is any radioactive decay measured in the box by a Geiger counter also located in the box, the flask of poison will be shattered, killing the cat.
During the time the cat is in the box, the lid is closed, so that we cannot observe anything that is happening inside. So how do we know during this time, if the cat is alive or dead? Since we cannot say either for certain, it is assumed that the cat is in between.
However, once the box is open, we will know for sure the fate of the cat, because it will be observed to be either alive or dead.
My point is that you think as much as you want about the fate of the cat, but once you open the box, it will be one way or the other. Probability doesn't matter anymore, it cannot change the fate of the cat.
The same is true about your application to Penn. Once you apply, it won't matter if you had a 30% chance or an 80% chance going in. You will eventually be either admitted or denied. So don't spend too much time worrying about it. Instead think about how your achievements represent you as a person.
While it's always good to think realistically and have practical goals, there has to be a point where you are willing to let go and admit to yourself that while you have done everything you can, the rest is up to chance. It's great to prepare to apply to college, excel in school, write great essays, and participate in and contribute to many activities, but don't stress too much about your odds of getting in. Believe me, it will drive you crazy!
Good luck!

[/Quote]
</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-pennsylvania/919923-waitlist-2014-discussion.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/university-pennsylvania/919923-waitlist-2014-discussion.html&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>Anyway, I feel like it's worth mentioning in this thread that the Asian guy from Disturbia attended Penn.</p>

<p>My advice:
1. Start early.
2. Stop worrying, start writing.
3. Ignore most of the "chance" crap. Almost all are wrong anyway.</p>

<p>I don't want to sound cynical or start a flame war but you guys (Poeme ) can say "what will happen will happen" with ease because you actually got into Penn, while there is definitely truth to what you are saying, would you still be offering such advice if you had been rejected, sure time would heal the disappointment to an extent but sometimes I feel like the people on here who chime in to give words of wisdom forget that if they had been rejected then they would have been at least slightly bitter, regardless of how much they told themselves that they are going to a great college (not their dream school).</p>

<p>There are a lot more people on this forum who were accepted to their dream school who offer advice such as "don't worry it will all work out" and "Stop stressing the right college will choose you" than there are people who got rejected from their dream schools who give that kind of advice. </p>

<p>Some people truly can live and not feel bitter about things like college admissions and be happy with whatever outcome, but for a far larger group, it sucks to get rejected, of course this is the opinion of a person who has yet to face rejection or acceptance so it is somewhat neutral.</p>

<p>The WikiMan,
I understand that you feel nervous about this whole process, but having gone through senior year, I have seen a lot of people literally make themselves sick over all of this.
There is a difference between caring and being obsessed. While it is okay to be worried at times and to question your actions, constantly reanalyzing your "chances" will not make your anxiety go away, even if what you are hearing is supposed to be positive. Their is no definite answer, so you will never reach the conclusion that you want to find. For me, this was something that was really hard to accept. But the day before my Penn decision, I started to think about the other colleges I had applied to, and I realized that although they were not my first choices, there were definitely several things about each that really interested me. This is why it is really important to choose safety and target schools that you are genuinely interested in.
I find that the best thing to do when you are nervous to try to do things that allow you to relax, like listen to or play music, read, watch comedies, or whatever you prefer. During November after I submitted my Penn application, I started to play farmville. While this was not the most productive thing to be doing, it was really nice to take my mind off of my anxiety by thinking about whether to plant strawberries or pineapples on my farm, or trying to arrange my animals in the most practical way (puzzles and sudoku could also provide this sort of effect). A more productive thing to do would be to make lists of what you want to get done for the week.</p>