Pre-Law Transfer: Cornell ILR vs UPenn?

<p>I have been accepted as a transfer student to both Cornell ILR and Penn. I want to go to law school and I know I will need a top GPA. </p>

<p>From which school will I have a better chance to obtain the top GPA needed for a top 14 law school?</p>

<p>Thanks for your help!</p>

<p>At whichever you feel most happy and motivated to succeed.</p>

<p>both are amazing schools, go to whatever you like the best and feel motivated to succeed and you will get the best GPA possible. Personally, I prefer Cornell over Penn but both schools are essentially equal.</p>

<p>Both are awesome. Law schools will view applicants from both colleges in the same light, so I would recommend you go with fit.</p>

<p>You may find those links interesting:</p>

<p>Career</a> Services, University of Pennsylvania</p>

<p><a href="http://www.career.cornell.edu/downloads/Law/PrelawGuide_2008kg.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.career.cornell.edu/downloads/Law/PrelawGuide_2008kg.pdf&lt;/a> (scroll to the last page)</p>

<p>One more voice adding 6 of one, half a dozen of the other. Congratulations and enjoy.</p>

<p>I can only speak for Cornell ILR. My D1 is graduating from ILR. She has wanted to be a lawyer since 4th grade. She choose ILR because of its high application and admission into law school. </p>

<p>My D took took the LSAT and did very well,, but as it turns out she was offered a job in finance at a BB after last summers internship, and accepted it. </p>

<p>She loved Cornell and her major in ILR. She interned in Geneva for a semester at the ILO (International Labor Organization.) She was able to minor in Information Science (ie, computer science.) There are other options for minors.</p>

<p>So you can definitely get into a top-14 law from ILR. You also can from Penn.</p>

<p>I cannot fathom why anyone would waste money going to an Ivy League school prelaw unless money is no issue. If a high GPA is your only concern, go to a state school. If other factors matter to you then it's a personal preference. Neither will "look better" on an application.</p>

<p>"Law schools will view applicants from both colleges in the same light" 99% of law schools will view applicants of 99% of colleges in the same light.</p>

<p>there is no such thing as pre-law at either of these schools i believe. most law school admissions counselors will suggest you pursue any major that you are passionate about and can do well in especially for developing analytical, reading, writing, and speaking skills.</p>

<p>At some schools, there is a "pre-law" major, but such a program is pretty much both lazy and useless.</p>

<p>anyways, like others have said: wherever you will be happier.</p>

<p>
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I cannot fathom why anyone would waste money going to an Ivy League school prelaw unless money is no issue. If a high GPA is your only concern, go to a state school. If other factors matter to you then it's a personal preference. Neither will "look better" on an application.

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Cornell and UPenn are much, much cheaper options for a large portion of students than any state school would be and having one of those names on your resume will be a boost come job-hunting time and will put your GPA and experience in context for admissions time. I'm heading off to ILR and one of the main things I've heard others say about choosing ILR is whether you're genuinely interested in the ILR curriculum or are attracted solely by its tradition of sending kids off to law school. Obviously you're not going to get a good GPA if you don't like the material, so just make sure that becomes the main consideration.</p>

<p>Actually Malan, that's not entirely true. Generally speaking, 60%-90% of students at public universities are in-state students and pay little to attend. In-staters will seldom have to pay significantly more for their public flagship than they would for aprivate university. Besides at schools like Cornell and Penn, 50%+ of the students pay full tuition to attend. However, I agree that for OOS students who come from lower-middle income families, elite private universities generally do end up being significantly cheaper than many of the elite public universities.</p>

<p>This said, Law schools do take quality of undergraduate education into consideration when evaluating applicants, so I can definitely understand why students interested in Law going on to Law school would want to attend a top university for their undergraduate studies. It is obviously not worth breaking the bank doing so as the benefits are not that great, but if one can afford it, the benefits are worth it in my opinion.</p>

<p>I said "large portion", not "majority" or "most". I can't speak "generally", but I can speak to what I know. My in-state flagship, Penn State, has a cost of attendance of nearly $30,000 with costs projected to go up even more AND they only meet, on average, 60% of a student's financial need. Sure, a select few public flagships, such as UVa and UNC which combine an already low cost of attendance with meeting a student's full need, are amazing deals, but a large portion of students at the rest of the public flagships with COAs similar to PSU and even worse financial aid situations wouldn't say they're "paying little to attend". It's dangerous to speak in such broad generalizations.</p>

<p>Thanks everyone for your input! I really appreciate it.</p>