Pre-med, any hope?

<p>Hey guys,</p>

<p>I'm a pre-med second year at Cal (just finished freshmen year). This Spring I got C's in both Chem 3A and Math 1B..and my overall GPA is ~3.04 at the moment. Is there any way I can still get into a "good" med school? I know I screwed up horribly but yeah is there anything I can do that could help me? (besides doing stellar on the MCAT...)</p>

<p>thanks!</p>

<p>halp me )::::::::</p>

<p>
[quote]

I'm a pre-med second year at Cal (just finished freshmen year). This Spring I got C's in both Chem 3A and Math 1B..and my overall GPA is ~3.04 at the moment. Is there any way I can still get into a "good" med school? I know I screwed up horribly but yeah is there anything I can do that could help me? (besides doing stellar on the MCAT...)

[/quote]
</p>

<p>there's too little information to go on but since you seem to really want to hear something....</p>

<p>if you continue to get grades like that you will have very little chance at getting into *any *medical school in the US let alone a "good" one. There are a lot of other factors that are taken into consideration, but with a GPA < 3.5 you're chances decrease significantly. Just do as well as you can in the rest of the prereqs and handle the MCAT. Those grades are behind you now, learn from your mistakes and correct them.</p>

<p>yeah most people would just be satisfied getting into any medical school, it's very competitive. focus on your grades, maybe take some easy science classes to raise your GPA.</p>

<p>Just try really hard sophomore year and watch out because IMO it's the worst year. Chem 3B/Bio 1A/1AL has pretty interesting material, but the tests can be pretty brutal if you don't stay on top of your work.</p>

<p>dude it doesn't matter if you did your premed courses at Harvard, UC Berkeley, or a CC</p>

<p>a 4.0 in your premed classes at a cc will trump a 3.5 from UC Berkeley</p>

<p>Just like Dr. Sanford, the author of Amazon.com:</a> Getting Into Medical School (9780764134470): Sanford J. Brown: Books said </p>

<p>
[quote]
i can emphatically say that an A in a general chemistry from a community college will not keep you out of medical school wheras a D in general chemistry from Harvard will

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<p>also</p>

<p>
[quote]
this is no special formula for converting A's to B's to C's... an A will put down as an A and a C will be put down as a C

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</p>

<p>I Don't intend to make you feel bad I just want to give you the facts</p>

<p>amplyprovidedfor,</p>

<p>Try to calm down first, and realize you've still got time to make up for that bad freshman year. Before summer ends, try to analyze what went wrong, and in the future - how can you can get better grades - whether that means an easier courseload, less involvement in EC's, etc. The good news is that med schools like to see improvement from the 1st year, so an upward trend in GPA would look good. Don't be too discouraged, you've still got 3 years ahead of you, so put all your effort into raising that GPA, and as well as working on all the other factors besides GPA. </p>

<p>Also, it's not impossible to get into med school w/ less than 3.5 GPA, I've heard plenty of stories, and you can check the stats here:</p>

<p>Table</a> 24: MCAT and GPA Grid for Applicants and Acceptees to U.S. Medical Schools, 2005-2007 (aggregated) - FACTS - AAMC</p>

<p>One more thing, any med school is a "good" med school, since it doesn't really matter in the end where you go, you'll be a doctor in the end.</p>

<p>
[quote]
i can emphatically say that an A in a general chemistry from a community college will not keep you out of medical school wheras a D in general chemistry from Harvard will

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yet it's highly unlikely that Harvard would actually assign a D grade to anybody because of Harvard's grade inflation.</p>

<p>I'm saying this with only third hand knowledge, but I heard math & science courses at Harvard are only slightly grade inflated. It's the humanities and social science courses that make getting A-/B+/B grades as easy as getting candy on October 31st.</p>

<p>JBeak, you're statement may be true for most humanities courses, but it is pretty wrong for most social science courses. Think about Econ, Haas, Political Science, and PEIS when you talk about the social sciences (as they form the bulk of the social science majors). Those courses are not the cakewalks you generalize them to be.</p>

<p>(full disclosure: I am not a social science major/minor, I just don't like it when false generalizations are made)</p>

<p>
[quote]
JBeak, you're statement may be true for most humanities courses, but it is pretty wrong for most social science courses.

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</p>

<p>Is it?</p>

<p>"The physical sciences and engineering had rigorous grading standards roughly in line with the recommendations from 1976," stated Rine, "while the humanities and social sciences in many classes had all but given up on grades below a B, and in many courses below an A-</p>

<p>Undergraduate</a> Education Colloquium, The College of Letters and Science, UC Berkeley</p>

<p>I can agree that social science courses tend to be graded more harshly than are humanities courses. But even more harshly graded are the natural sciences and engineering. </p>

<p>
[quote]
I'm saying this with only third hand knowledge, but I heard math & science courses at Harvard are only slightly grade inflated.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Yet the fact remains that, despite being one of the premier science schools in the world, and having numerous students who either major in science or who major in other subjects but nevertheless take science courses (such as premeds fulfilling their required coursework), Harvard practically never assigns grades of D's (or worse).</p>

<p>48.5% of Harvard grades last year were A's and A-minuses, compared with 33.2 percent of grades in 1985. Grades in the three C categories fell from 10 percent in 1985 to 4.9 percent last year. D's and failing grades accounted for less than 1 percent each.</p>

<p>Harvard</a> Figures Show Most of Its Grades are A's or B's</p>

<p>
[quote]
i can emphatically say that an A in a general chemistry from a community college will not keep you out of medical school wheras a D in general chemistry from Harvard will<br>

[/quote]
</p>

<p>i didnt mean for you guys to apply this quote to Harvard but to UC Berkeley because of how hard the curves are</p>

<p>@anon5389567, I’m not talking about Berkeley. I was addressing sakky’s post which was talking about Harvard. </p>

<p>Either way though, the four majors you listed does not make the out the bulk of the social science majors because there are certainly more than eight possible social science majors. Econ/Buisness (I heard buisness classes are actually easy once you get into Haas??)/PIES/Political Science are actually the minority. And I didn’t generalize saying ALL social science / humanities courses are like that. I only said MOST</p>

<p>Political science and Economics is the second and third biggest major behind MCB.</p>

<p>Per the last career center report
Intense social sciences
Political Science has 475 majors a year
Economics has 497 majors a year (it used to be less than PS)
Haas has 327 majors a year
PEIS has 219
(total = 1518) </p>

<p>All other social sciences
History has 239
Psychology has 399
Anthropology has 122
Ethnic Studies has 79
Geography has 33
Sociology has 262
Linguistics has 49
(total = 1183)</p>

<p>The numbers show that those four majors do form the bulk of the social sciences.</p>

<p>As per the life sciences, all the life sciences (excluding MCB) (i.e. IB/PMB/NST/etc...) all maintain average departmental GPAs around 3.3. The university average is also around 3.3. I would suppose that anything around 3.3 should probably be considered average difficulty.</p>

<p><a href="http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/uc-transfers/900945-average-gpa-graduating-students-major.html%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/uc-transfers/900945-average-gpa-graduating-students-major.html&lt;/a> (see post 2)</p>

<p>Most of the social sciences have average departmental GPAs between 3.2 and 3.4, with only a few outliers (Econ in the 3.0x range and Chicano Studies, Gender & Women's Studies in the 3.4x range and Ethnic Studies in 3.5x range). Given this data, it is pretty clear, most of the social sciences departments at Cal have fairly average average GPAs.</p>

<p>The scenario is a little bit more like
-Most of the Physical Sciences, Most of CoE, MCB, Math, Statistics, and a few others are the ones with above average difficulty (3.2/-)</p>

<p>-Most of the Life Sciences (minus MCB and Bio 1A/B) and most of the Social Sciences, as well as a few others have a more average difficulty (3.2-3.4)</p>

<p>-Most of the Humanities and a couple others have the least difficulty (3.4/+)</p>