Pros/Cons of These Colleges [Long List]

<p>I'm ok with the isolation of rural campuses and I'm aware of the costs. What are the other pros & cons of these places?</p>

<p>HI
Brigham Young U. Hawaii
HI Pacific U. Loa Campus</p>

<p>CA
Westmont C.
Pacific Union C.
Humboldt State U.
U. of Redlands
Monterey Institute of International Studies</p>

<p>OR
U. of OR
OR State U.
Western OR U.
Southern OR U.
OIT
Pacific U.</p>

<p>WA
Evergreen State C.</p>

<p>CO
Naropa U.</p>

<p>UT
Snow C.</p>

<p>IN
Hanover C.
Goshen C.</p>

<p>OH
Kenyon C.
Oberlin C.
Ursuline C.</p>

<p>PA
Allegheny C.
Lock Haven U. of PA
Chestnut Hill C.</p>

<p>NY
Bard C.
Global C.
SUNY ESF
Paul Smith’s C.
Skidmore C.
Colgate U.
Mount Saint Mary C.
Keuka C.
C. of Mount Saint Vincent</p>

<p>MA
Lesley U. Environmental Studies/Education
Mt. Holyoke C.
Wellesley C.
Amherst C.
Hampshire C.
Williams C.
Newbury C.
C. at Simon’s Rock
Gordon C.
Conway School of Landscape Design
Endicott C.
Pine Manor C.
U. of MA Amherst
Mount Ida C.
Marian Court C.</p>

<p>VT
SIT
Bennington C.
Champlain C.
Goddard C.
Green Mountain C.
Johnson State C.
Landmark C.
Marlboro C.
Sterling C.
Middlebury C.
Burlington C.
Southern Vermont C.
Lyndon State U.</p>

<p>NH
Antioch New England Graduate School
New England C.
Southern New Hampshire U.
Rivier C.
Plymouth State U.</p>

<p>CT
Connecticut C.</p>

<p>ME
C. of the Atlantic
St. Joseph’s C. of ME
Bowdoin C.
Bates C.</p>

<p>KY
Alice Lloyd College
Pikeville College</p>

<p>TN
U. of the South</p>

<p>NC
Montreat C.
Appalachian State U.
Western Carolina U.
Brevard C.
Warren Wilson C.</p>

<p>GA
Berry C.
Toccoa Falls C.</p>

<p>Short Summary:</p>

<p>Pros:Some are great, some are good.
Cons: some are not so good.</p>

<p>This is a joke, right? You're asking people to comment on approximately 80 colleges? Some of these schools are pretty obscure. Also obscure is why you have chosen these colleges. Why do Bard and Toccoa Falls, a small Christan college, appear on your list? Pretty opposite from each other. What research have you done? Have you searched CC for information? Remember, Google is your friend.</p>

<p>No, anyone can comment on any of them. I have checked out websites and some reviews of the more obscure ones, and was curious if anyone on here would have some input.</p>

<p>Sorry, that's just way too many, try narrowing it down to less than 15 at most, ideally 10.</p>

<p>In addition posting too large of a list, it is impossible for us to give you advice unless we know a few things. So, here is what will help us understand and answer accordingly:</p>

<p>Year in school
GPA (UW/Weighted)
Course Rigor
State Residency
Career/Major Goals (or at least interests)
Test Scores</p>

<p>Have an idea what you want in a campus. For instance, I can't imagine the same person that would be interested in a Mormon school would be confortable at a fraternity party at Hanover, or a person that feels confortable at Warren Wilson would find kindred spirits at Sewanee. Why have graduate schools on the list? </p>

<p>HI
Brigham Young U. Hawaii-pro-great location, great if you are Mormon; con-restrictive socially if not able to live under Mormon principles</p>

<p>CA
Humboldt State U.pro-beautiful around campus, mellow happy students. con-prestige
U. of Redlands-pro-know happy graduates. Con-no graduate that I know personally felt career center/networking benefit after college</p>

<p>IN
Hanover C.-great school, River Studies, active Greek life, good merit aid to top candidates. Con-small, homogenous group, not Phi Beta Kapps. (DS accepted and in running).
Goshen C.-Mennonite, great peaceful, hippie environment. Con-not known for great financial aid or career services</p>

<p>OH
Kenyon C. pro-great writing program, buautiful campus. con-selective, homogenous </p>

<p>MA
Lesley U. Environmental Studies/Education
Mt. Holyoke C. single sex, prestige, good merit aid
Wellesley C.-single sex education, prestige, good merit aid
C. at Simon’s Rock-early college opportunity</p>

<p>TN
U. of the South -Sewanee? recently dropped tuition cost in order to give less merit aid, wear gowns as recognition of high GPA</p>

<p>NC</p>

<p>Warren Wilson C. unique working school environment, very liberal with a strong environmental focus. "so granola the place feels like a commune" was how DS described it.</p>

<p>3.5GPA and interested in environment/sustainability, social science or CS.
I don't have an issue with strict rules on campus living and for party schools, as long as there's a group of people who have fun outside of parties I'm OK.</p>

<p>Of the schools you named, the following are on the "College Confidential Top Liberal Arts College" list:</p>

<p>Amherst
Bowdoin
Bates
Colgate
Kenyon
Middlebury
Mt. Holyoke
Oberlin
Wellesley
Williams</p>

<p>All these schools are selective, small, private liberal arts colleges. They are expensive (over $50K) but offer good need-based financial aid to qualifying students. To be admitted, typically you need to be in the top 10% of your HS class (a little lower in some cases), with SATs above 1950 or so (higher for some of them) and good ECs.</p>

<p>You can get to lots of information about these 10 schools (and other selective liberal arts colleges) from the following page:
Colleges</a> and Universities - College Confidential</p>

<p>Bard arguably belongs on the "top colleges" list. Allegheny, Connecticut College, and Skidmore are slightly less selective versions of the same formula, too. Bennington, College of the Atlantic, Goddard, Hampshire, Marlboro, Naropa, and Warren Wilson all have an "alternative" (experimental or "hippie school") flavor.</p>

<p>
[quote]
NC
Montreat C.
Appalachian State U.
Western Carolina U.
Brevard C.
Warren Wilson C.

[/quote]

Warren Wilson is the best on the list. Very small, very quirky. Much more down to earth (literally, given the farm) and less pretentious than other alternative schools. Beautiful campus and new facilities. Not nearly as conveniently located near Asheville as it claims. </p>

<p>App State is a good school and a bargain for in-state kids. It's a popular back-up option for Chapel Hill, and lots end up transferring out. Boone is a small but decent college town. Football is big. Not sure I'd recommend it to OOS students.</p>

<p>I would not recommend WCU to either in-state or OOS students if they could get in somewhere else. Beautiful location but isolated. Heavy drinking school and fairly weak academics.</p>

<p>Brevard is mediocre and overshadowed by UNC Asheville. Montreat I know of by name only.</p>

<p>
[quote]
ME
C. of the Atlantic
Bowdoin C.

[/quote]

I have long been a staunch supporter of COA. It has a very interdisciplinary curriculum, but its strengths are in the arts, environmental science, and human ecology. Very nice campus and beautiful location. The drawbacks are the limited course offerings and the very tiny student body. Has the highest percentage of international students of any LAC (or used to).</p>

<p>Bowdoin is one of my top three favorite LACs (Haverford and Davidson are the other two) for its mix of academics and a good social scene with relaxed students. A very strong school with particular strengths in government, the sciences, and English. Good housing, good food. Nice coastal campus.</p>

<p>You also have a lot of state schools on the list. Understand that state schools give little aid to OOS candidates. Many of the LACs listed here will not offer CS.</p>

<p>To be quite honest, I'm not interested in CS, I like astronomy more than CS but I thought of that as something for a later major or even transfer if things really don't work out.</p>

<p>I like being outside a lot, and am considering doing national semester exchanges if possible or study abroad during the spring/summer/winter.</p>

<p>Be aware that CS, physics, astronomy, and most other sciences (other than biology) are not that popular to major in, so that if you are considering majoring in them, you need to check whether the school you are interested in has sufficient breadth and depth on the subject (some small schools have a major, but with very limited courses available).</p>

<p>For CS, ABET</a> - accreditation can give assurance of the school's CS degree program meeting a minimum standard, although the lack thereof does not necessarily means it is bad for CS (but you'll have to evaluate it individually if it does not have ABET accreditation).</p>

<p>Snow College is THE safety for BYU applicants or where you go if you want to go to BYU but aren't qualified yet. They even put ads on buses around here that say "Start at Snow, Finish at BYU."</p>

<p>HPU Loa Campus
Humboldt S.U.
Monterey Institute of International Studies
U. of OR
OR State U.
Western OR U.
Southern OR U.
Bard C.
Global C.
Paul Smith C.
Colgate U.
C. at Simon’s Rock
Conway School of Landscape Design
SIT
Bennington C.
Champlain C.
Goddard C.
Green Mountain C.
Johnson State C.
Landmark C.
Marlboro C.
Middlebury C.
Burlington C.
Southern Vermont C.
Lyndon State U.
Antioch New England
New England C.
Rivier C.
Plymouth State U.
C. of the Atlantic
Alice Lloyd College
Pikeville College
U. of the South
Montreat C.
Brevard C.
Warren Wilson C.
Berry C.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Conway School of Landscape Design....
U. of the South

[/quote]

How in the world are you picking your schools???</p>

<p>Yeah, I am still at a loss as well. I remember from a different post you wanted natural beuty, outdoorsy schools. Why not search the threads for schools with great environmental science programs. Beloit and Earlham come to mind, as well as colgate and Marlboro. </p>

<p>Also, where is your state? Money may be no object but do you really want to go for an obscure OOS school that gives no merit aid when a better program could exist at a lower net cost with aid? I am all for instate publics as an option, but less in love with OOS publics without the ability to afford it.</p>

<p>St</a>. Lawrence University </p>

<p>Here is another natural beauty, outdoorsy school, not yet mentioned! :)</p>

<p>St. Lawrence University (NY)</p>

<p>Picking by major and location.</p>

<p>You do know that Conway only has a graduate program?</p>

<p>Yes, as does Antioch.</p>