questions about college admissions terms

<p>i have some (probably stupid) questions about some terms that ive come across and i wasnt sure what they meant. care to enlighten me?</p>

<p>*weighted gpa
*unweighted gpa
*superscore
*deferred
*waitlisted
*early action
*early decision</p>

<p>there were some others but i dont remember them at the moment. and dont be mean! my school doesnt really help people that want to go out of state for college. and im sure other people have these questions too...</p>

<p>*weighted gpa- Some schools "weight" certain classes (AB/IB/honors/dual enrollment) by adding percentage point on a 100% scale or points on a 4.0 scale. For example, my school adds 1.0 for honors and 2.0 for IB/AP.</p>

<p>*unweighted gpa- This is your GPA out of a 4.0 scale or 100% scale with no points granted for course difficulty.</p>

<p>*superscore- Most schools will take your highest score on each section of the SAT regardless of when you took it. Your superscored SAT is the one using your highest scores rather than a single sitting.</p>

<p>*deferred- When you apply to a school through an Early Action or Early Decision program, you can be rejected, accepted, or deferred, which means they will reassess your application with the regular decision applicants for April 1 admissions.</p>

<p>*waitlisted- Colleges waitlist applicants in the event that more students turn down offers of admission than they expected (schools want to maintain the size of their freshman class). Waitlisted students should accept offers of admission from other schools in the event that they are not taken off the waitlist.</p>

<p>*early action- Early Action is an early admissions program that does not bind students who are accepted to attend. Some schools, like Stanford and Yale, use Single Choice Early Action, which means that, while students are still not bound to attend if accepted, they cannot apply to other schools early.</p>

<p>*early decision- Early Decision is an early admissions program to bind students to matriculate if accepted. If accepted, you must withdraw all other applications. ED acceptance rates are often higher than Regular Decision as colleges aren't gambling on whether or not the student will accept their offer of admissions, but it's not advisable to abuse this admissions boost unless you are 100% sure this school is your top choice. There are rumors that schools share information about ED applicants who abuse the system and don't withdraw their applications from other schools, so beware of declining an ED offer--this is only allowed in the event of unacceptable financial aid.</p>

<p>ok thanks so much! so about weighted/unweighted gpa... my school only tells us one gpa not both. on a 100% scale, they add 2 points for honors classes and 5 points fot ap classes at the end of the semester. then the final grade and final grades from all the other classes average together to make up your gpa. mine is 99.7, with several honoors/ap classes. so would that be a weighted gpa?</p>

<p>Yes, that 99.7 would be your weighted GPA, but the weighting is less generous at your school than at many. Schools on a 4-point scale typically give .5 or 1 additional point out of 4 for honors and AP classes, which would equate to 5 or 10 points on your final. But I would imagine that the colleges handle their own weighting, or understand your school, anyway.</p>

<p>ok thanks this helps a lot!</p>

<p>one of my friends told me that if u get an a in an ap class thats like a 5.0 instead of a 4.0 when u calculate your gpa and that an a in an honors class is like a 4.25. does this seem accurate?</p>

<p>I have a question too, about early decision a poster above said about declining ED "this is only allowed in the event of unacceptable financial aid. " How will a college know if the financial aid they give is enough? I want to apply to ED to a school whose tuition is more than 40,000 but if enough financial aid isnt given, my parents said they cant pay for it. The thing is, my parents make about 150,000 together, but a lot of that money is going elsewhere. How will the college know that e cant afford it, or will they take our word?</p>

<p>goldandblue--your 5.0 and 4.25 are accurate for some schools. Our public school weights AP grades just as you listed, but does not weight honors. Every school is different.</p>

<p>tb0mb93--you might post your question in the financial aid forum to get an answer.</p>

<p>
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one of my friends told me that if u get an a in an ap class thats like a 5.0 instead of a 4.0 when u calculate your gpa and that an a in an honors class is like a 4.25. does this seem accurate?

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</p>

<p>It varies by school--as I said earlier, my school gives a 5.00 for an A in an honors class and a 6.00 for an A in an AP/IB class. Because it varies so much, colleges use *un*weighted GPA, which is calculated on a 4.0 scale.</p>

<p>
[quote]
have a question too, about early decision a poster above said about declining ED "this is only allowed in the event of unacceptable financial aid. " How will a college know if the financial aid they give is enough? I want to apply to ED to a school whose tuition is more than 40,000 but if enough financial aid isnt given, my parents said they cant pay for it. The thing is, my parents make about 150,000 together, but a lot of that money is going elsewhere. How will the college know that e cant afford it, or will they take our word?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>It is generally unwise to apply ED if your ability to attend the school depends on a generous finaid offer. And even if you do get finaid, you won't be able to compare it to other schools' offers.</p>