Questions

<p>Hi all, I'm going to be a freshman at Yale next year, and I have some questions about choosing classes.</p>

<p>First, is there any point to acceleration credit from AP scores? I don't plan on graduating early, and unless it's possible to take graduate classes for credit at Yale after completing the 36 credit requirement early (is it? I can't find info on it), then I don't see a point. Trying to take advantage of all of my AP credit makes me feel like my options are more restricted. For instance, I can get credit for Bio, Chem, English, Math, and Physics. As a prospective chemistry / chemical engineering major, getting credit for Chem, Math, and Physics is not going to be a problem (although to maximize credit from Chem I have to take 2 Chem courses my first year, which seems kind of rushed). For Bio and English, though, in order to explore I feel like I should take a class that perhaps appeals to me more than a general Bio or English class, or even use those spaces to explore other fields (because I'm certainly not set on chem).</p>

<p>Sorry if any of this sounds super naive or anxious ... I'm just really excited. I want to make the most of all the opportunities I have and I don't want to "waste" any spots on my schedule (although I'm sure no class at Yale is really a "waste"). So yeah, maybe I should just ask for general advice for a prospective chem/chem engineering major who wants to explore fields like biology and economics as potential majors while leaving spots open for music and art history-ish classes because I love them :)</p>

<p>Second question ... it's a basic one and I THINK it's in the handbook but I'm abroad at the moment and I don't have access to the book. Is it possible to have a course count for more than one requirement? For instance, if a class is both a humanities and a writing class, does it fulfill one of each? Or can we only choose one?</p>

<p>Sorry again for all the babbling! I appreciate any advice :)</p>

<p>
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Second question ... it's a basic one and I THINK it's in the handbook but I'm abroad at the moment and I don't have access to the book. Is it possible to have a course count for more than one requirement? For instance, if a class is both a humanities and a writing class, does it fulfill one of each? Or can we only choose one?

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<p>I can answer that question - for distributional requirements, you cannot double count.</p>

<p>Acceleration credit should only be used for placement in more advanced classes (for example having a five on Calc BC and Macro letting you into intermediate macro).</p>

<p>I went in as prospective econ/engineering and took math and physics both semesters, econ both semesters, and then three three humanities classes (one history, one political science, one english), and aside from physics being overly difficult it was good.</p>

<p>I'm just going to assume you are the typical Yale science major, and thus have taken relevant APs in math and science. For fall, you'll want to take Chem 118 or one of the orgos (freshman orgo has a generous curve, but more history of science in lieu of quantitative work, which many people complained about), multivariable calc (ENAS 151 is my recommendation unless you can get Michael Frame for Math 120, which is possible if you show up early to the preregistration meeting for math), an econ course (I'd recommend intro micro), and then something to expand your horizons like a music or art history seminar. Do not take five credits until the spring.</p>

<p>Also, for the record, some classes here certainly are wastes. Not every professor is good just because they teach at Yale.</p>

<p>Thanks Yalemom2 for the response!</p>

<p>
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Acceleration credit should only be used for placement in more advanced classes (for example having a five on Calc BC and Macro letting you into intermediate macro).

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<p>Sounds good. Anyone else have other opinions?</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
For fall, you'll want to take Chem 118 or one of the orgos (freshman orgo has a generous curve, but more history of science in lieu of quantitative work, which many people complained about), multivariable calc (ENAS 151 is my recommendation unless you can get Michael Frame for Math 120, which is possible if you show up early to the preregistration meeting for math), an econ course (I'd recommend intro micro), and then something to expand your horizons like a music or art history seminar.

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<p>I'm thinking about taking Chem 124, although the course evaluations on OCI seem a bit mixed on the class ... some said to shop 220 because it was more direct, but I thought that was a sophomore class? I took multivariable and linear algebra in high school, but I feel a little shaky on it so I think I'll retake it. Also, I read about ENAS 151 being a good substitute for Math 120, but a) if Math 120 is listed as a major pre-requirement, can ENAS 151 replace it? and b) is it a true substitute for the class? Like, are all the same topics covered and to the same depth?</p>

<p>
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Do not take five credits until the spring.

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<p>Does a lab class count as a separate credit?</p>

<p>For my first term I was looking at CHEM 124, CHEM 126L (lab), ENAS 151, and some class in the areas I want to explore (perhaps intro micro like you mentioned). Also, I found 2 freshman seminars that I'd be interested in that also cover a writing credit (Music & Melancholy and Architecture & Utopia). Is that too much (I'd choose one of the 2 seminars, of course, not both)?</p>

<p>This also leads me to some other questions (sorry for asking so much!) First, how hard is it to get into your top choice freshman seminars? Is it safe to say that I'll get into one of the 2 I mentioned above or not? Second, is it a good idea to take a non-English class to cover the writing requirement? Like, does it matter that I won't be learning writing from a normal English class but rather from a music or architecture teacher? The latter appeals to my interests more but I'm not sure if the amount of writing I'll be learning will be the same.</p>

<p>
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Also, for the record, some classes here certainly are wastes. Not every professor is good just because they teach at Yale.

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<p>haha yeah, I understand that, I put that line there in case someone would call me out for using the word "waste," but I guess I got called out anyways! :)</p>

<p>Sorry again for all the questions!</p>

<p>Exactly - half of 124 is discussing the history of chemistry. In terms of of traditional science education (i.e. doing quantitative problem sets and such) it is lighter than 220.</p>

<p>The schedule overall looks good, apparently you'd been looking at the same classes I'd recommended. Labs count for .5 of a credit, so if you plan on taking a yearlong chem course (as you will with 124/125 or 220/221), then you should go 4.5 credits each semester - 4 regular classes in addition to the half credit for the lab. Chem 124 (let's say), Chem 126L, ENAS 151, ECON 115, and MUSI 023 (again for example) would be a nice complete schedule. With that said, it ruins shopping period if you go into it with preconceptions on what class you want to take, so aside from the set math and science classes, have an open mind, or at least give other classes you might be interested in a shot before you set your mind on what you first think looks good.</p>

<p>It's not terribly easy, though it's all dependent on how popular the seminar you select is. Basically all freshman fill out the preregistration, and there are 14 slots a seminar, so if you want a more famous one, it'll be difficult. So no, it's not safe to say that you'll get in. That's why you fill out all five choices on the seminar preregistration, and why you have backup options in regular Yale courses. There should be seminars in music, literature or poli sci that might seem interesting to you - shop them, talk to the professor afterward, and you might get in if it isn't very popular.</p>

<p>Regarding the writing credit, it is entirely dependent on what your goal of the writing credit class is. Are you intending to eliminate a distributional credit you don't want to deal with, or are you trying to become a better writer? If the former, take any class with a writing credit; if the latter, you should take either English 114 or English 120 (I would definitely recommend 120 if you are a competent writer). While possibly less interesting than a music class, the focus of the professor is on your essay composition, rather than another subject. In essence, English writing seminars revolve around the writing process, whereas most non-English writing credits do not.</p>

<p>This is completely off subject, well kind of, but I have a question as well. If I'm really set on getting into a seminar with a specific professor, is it inappropriate to email that professor before I even shop the seminar? I'm an incoming freshman, by the way. I don't want to come of, idk, too eager, or overwhelming to the professor..</p>

<p>Acceleration credits can be useful if, say you decide to take a semester off-campus and instead of 4 or 5 credits, you only take 3. Then you won't be behind and can still graduate with your class. Later on, all students can choose to remove acceleration credits. Carry the and de-accelerate later if it suits you.</p>

<p>I'd email the prof. Just don't be too pushy. I'm sure other students do the same. Worse thing (s)he can do is say no, right?</p>

<p>^^ Yeah, true, but she's also the dean of the RC I'm in. She'll be seeing a lot of me the next four years. Hahaha, how awful would it be if she hates me to begin with, lol jk :D</p>

<p>I'm also trying to decided which chem class to take. Which has an easier curve, 220 or 124?</p>

<p>99999, do not e-mail them over the summer. Has pre-registration even started? Wait until shopping period, or since she's the dean of your RC, just talk to her in person (you'll see A LOT of her during Camp Yale, trust me). Tell her you were looking into taking her class. Be subtle about it, but make sure you tell her you want to take her class in some way. </p>

<p>^Probably freshman orgo, but I don't think it's worth it if you're a) not learning the same thing and b) not interested in the history.</p>

<p>Yeah I hadn't emailed her yet, haha thanks for the advice. I'll probably hold off on it and see how the chips fall once I get to campus.</p>

<p>You can take graduate level courses to complete the 36 course requirement if using AP courses for placement. Also could do a double major or dabble in more humanity courses than one can typical schedule with all the science pre-reqs. It is also possible to complete a MA in the same four years. It would be a shame to use AP classes to graduate early which is hardly ever done if even possible.</p>

<p>
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In essence, English writing seminars revolve around the writing process, whereas most non-English writing credits do not.

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<p>Do I still do an acceptable amount of practice in a non-English class? A seminar specifically about the writing process doesn't really interest me ... it's like high school all over again.</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
Acceleration credits can be useful if, say you decide to take a semester off-campus and instead of 4 or 5 credits, you only take 3. Then you won't be behind and can still graduate with your class. Later on, all students can choose to remove acceleration credits. Carry the and de-accelerate later if it suits you.

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</p>

<p>Well, I'm getting 5 credits already (2 Chem, 2 Math, 1 Physics), and that should cover all the missing credits I'd have if I chose to go abroad, right? I'm just wondering whether it is necessary / a good idea to take advantage of ALL possible acceleration credit even if it means restricting class options. I still have 2 or 3 credits available from English or Bio, but I'd rather take other classes in place of those.</p>

<p>
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Probably freshman orgo, but I don't think it's worth it if you're a) not learning the same thing and b) not interested in the history.

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<p>What's your recommendation? The freshman orgo evaluations don't seem to be that bad ... and is majoring in science at Yale as bad as that article says it is? I mean ... I have friends there doing MB&B or Chem and they seem to be fine ... I guess I should've looked these things up earlier ...</p>

<p>
[QUOTE]
You can take graduate level courses to complete the 36 course requirement if using AP courses for placement. Also could do a double major or dabble in more humanity courses than one can typical schedule with all the science pre-reqs. It is also possible to complete a MA in the same four years. It would be a shame to use AP classes to graduate early which is hardly ever done if even possible.

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</p>

<p>Yeah, I understand that AP classes are helpful in placing into higher classes. My question was more concerning the actual acceleration credits you get by taking these higher classes and whether or not I can benefit from them. From the looks of it, they're not very useful. And of course, I would never dream of leaving Yale in any less than 4 years!</p>

<p>Writing classes - Yale classifies WR credits by defining a minimum number of pages required to be written in a class and any class that meets that requirement is called a WR credit. It might also involve drafts and number of assignments, but that's the basic jist of it. In an English class, you will spend time talking about how to approach the writing process, editing, etc. But, that only really happens in ENGL 114 and 120. The literature classes don't spend THAT much time talking about the writing process, more like 3 or 4 classes, if that. Classes in other dep'ts that are WR credits will vary - some will focus on the writing process (most likely in section) others won't. Look around, read a bit about the work in the class, and decide based on that.</p>

<p>Orgo - Can't make a recommendation. I didn't take freshman orgo or Orgo yet. I would say to base it off professors and evaluations. Shop both as well. I think freshman orgo might be a little bit better, especially in grading. Just be prepared to not learn as much concepts as you might like. But, this is all based on what I've heard, so don't take my word for it.</p>

<p>Acceleration - not sure if there's a different process for this, but just use your APs to place out of Intro classes. It'll literary end up being the same thing in your case. You jump into more advanced classes, finish your major sooner, and allow you to take as many classes as you want outside of your major. Also, use it if you want to take a semester off or take less classes one semester. But as people have said, that's the only time it's useful.</p>

<p>Sorry to revive the thread, but I don't remember one of my questions being answered :)</p>

<p>Can ENAS 151 replace MATH 120 in all circumstances? Not in content but in terms of major requirements and such? I remember seeing MATH 120 as a requirement for many majors but I don't recall seeing ENAS 151 mentioned as an alternative ...</p>

<p>You can speak to the DUS/professor and tell them that you have taken ENAS 151 and they should be okay with it. I don't see why they wouldn't take ENAS 151. :/</p>