Read this: ACT Reading

<p>Alright so I'm having problems with the pesky ACT reading. The main problem for me (and probably most people) is that there is too little time to complete the questions. Comparatively, even the SAT gives more time for the CR section (though there is vocab.) than the ACT. I'm definitely realizing that there is a different strategy for the ACT reading. What is the correct approach to this section?</p>

<p>Any help?</p>

<p>Yahp! I have the exact same problem. The prep books give little to no advice for the reading section. I just see the 1000 word passages and flip out because the words are all jumbled and the answers aren't highlighted or anything haha (not saying that i'm used to them being right there, but rather that it'd be nice if they were).</p>

<p>Yeah, I think one of the secrets is to calmly read the passages. However, if you're too calm you won't ever get to the questions =). There must be a way to read quickly and attain all the knowledge too.</p>

<p>Read quickly and write one word summaries next to the paragraphs.</p>

<p>Yeah......i too have the same problem can anyone come up with very appropriate suggestion for me. ACT reading takes lots of time and how to finish it within limited time. Does anyone have some suggestions for books to read or any advise........ please help me i am in serious need of help......................</p>

<p>A trick that worked for me--not sure if it would be helpful for anyone else--is to take practice tests in noisy, hurried environments. If a teacher would give us 10 minutes of free time, I'd try to finish one passage while everyone else talked, or I'd attempt to finish two passages in my fifteen minute ride to school. Comparatively, this made the actual test time and environment very comfortable.</p>

<p>What prepared me for the reading section was a year of AP Language & Composition multiple choice reading comp quizzes. My teacher gave us a lot of them that were harder than both the AP and ACT reading comp sections. The passages were about half a page longer than the ACT readings and we got a minute per question to complete the quiz. So everyone failed the class, but rocked the AP and ACT. Try asking an advanced English teacher at school for practice reading comp quizzes.</p>

<p>What books (besides the Red Book) have you guys been using for the Reading Section?</p>

<p>The secret is read! read! read! The more you read novels, magazines, articles etc.. the better you become. Reading advanced novels that interest should also improve your vocabulary as well. Set goals for yourself, such as increasing pace. Take an interest in what you're reading (it helps), and always read for meaning. While reading you can experiment with ways to improve pace etc.. in this way you'll be aware of what stratigies work and which do not.</p>

<p>When I started my freshman year of high school, our Honors English teacher had us work through a speed reading class. That bit of prep helped me through high shcool, college, board meetings, etc. I don't remember having difficulties with time on my ACT either and i score a 32 in the dark ages. There are several books out there with speed reading tips. Try one and see if it helps.</p>

<p>IBAustralia is right. Practice reading and practice reading fast while still following the concept of the passages and paying attention to details. I used to not be able to finish reading the passages but now I usually finish with some time left. It's definitely doable.</p>

<p>These are good tips I'll have to try them!</p>

<p>I agree with IBAustralia. Practice reading fast. For me, I practice speed reading with Time articles. They're short just like ACT passages, so I won't die from boring reads. You should also try to read articles that are hard for you. For me science articles are hard. Also, try to take practice tests with a few minutes less than the actual one. I found this to be effective in that it pushed me to read faster while understanding the passage.</p>

<p>Alright, so by examining the ACT Reading questions I have discovered that it isn't really that hard. In both the SAT and ACT the answers will be supported by the passage,however, the SAT requires you to think more deeply about the passage. The ACT on the other hand, will have answers DIRECTLY stated in the passage- in many cases the answer will literally by copied word for word (though the reading section still requires you to think a little about the passage). Knowing this has helped me a bit- and knowing is half the battle!</p>

<p>"The secret is read! read! read! The more you read novels, magazines, articles etc.. the better you become. Reading advanced novels that interest should also improve your vocabulary as well. Set goals for yourself, such as increasing pace. Take an interest in what you're reading (it helps), and always read for meaning. While reading you can experiment with ways to improve pace etc.. in this way you'll be aware of what stratigies work and which do not."</p>

<p>Great advice. I'm a long time reader and enjoy reading books in my spare time. I didn't do anything regarding notes or study tips, but I was able to go through quickly and still have time to check my answers. It's not necessary to read everything. </p>

<p>I know a lot of people say to not do this, but what I basically did was skim the passage, read the question, then go back to the article and read that section more in depth.</p>

<p>Do you guys think it is a good idea to take a little bit more time to underline and circle main ideas and other important info. in the passages? I could be time-consuming but with some practice it might actually work. Has anyone tried this and did it work?</p>

<p>Just testing new strategies!</p>

<p>I agree with MizzBee. I'm reading a speed reading book right now(Break-through Rapid Reading by Peter Kump) and it has helped my reading speed immensely. I increased my speed from 250wpm (words per minute) to 350wpm after two chapters. Basically, if you want to improve your reading speed instantly, follow the lines with your index finger like little kids do. This helps you avoid regressing in the text. Time yourself, it seriously works. Secondly, practice avoiding sub-vocalization (saying the words in your head) when reading. I got the book just for the ACT, but it's helping with my other work too.</p>