Retaking a Class + Transfering in one year

<p>I changed my major like 5 times and finally settled on Biology. The problem is I have 0 Biology classes done and plan to apply this November, is this a problem? 1 should be done in December the other 2 for Spring. IGETC will be done by Fall 2011. I would love to transfer to UCSD, UCSB, UCI, or better (UCs) Have approx. 3.0 right now.</p>

<p>When I was an Engineering major I failed Physics part 2 out of 3. Do I need to retake this fall to have a shot at some schools? Is it ok to retake this class in the Spring?-It will pretty much make me unable to have a job during M-Th, as I'm already taking three other courses. </p>

<p>Also do you think all of the UCs would let me replace the Engineering Physics for the Life Science Physics? This way I only need to take part 2 and 3, instead of 1 & 2 of Life Science Physics (at the same time as part 2 engineering to replace F). One UC has that on Assist only.</p>

<p>At my CC I won election for Associated Students Senator. However I will probably resign because I can't attend meetings due to a conflicting, but necessary class. Does being a Senator help an application significantly?</p>

<p>Once you transfer to a UC, you cannot change your major. The UC admissions office is going to wonder how you settled on Biology, without having (at the time) finished any biology classes. You will need to convince admissions officers through your essay biology is the subject you are truly passionate about (perhaps through previous experience like employment or research), or you are going to have trouble getting in. Second semester physics is a requirement - you will probably need to retake that, but check assist. Your chances would be much better in Fall 2012 with a higher gpa; but if you really want to get out of cc, I suppose some lower-tier UC's might be lenient.</p>

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Once you transfer to a UC, you cannot change your major.

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<p>Is this a joke? Do you know anything, or are you just spitting bs onto the board with no actual sources? I didn't even read the rest of the message because of how ill informed the first sentence is.</p>

<p>To the OP, I would not listen to this responder.</p>

<p>My suggestion would be to complete a TAG agreement and assure yourself a spot in one of the UCs. Then none of that other stuff will really matter.</p>

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[quote]
Also do you think all of the UCs would let me replace the Engineering Physics for the Life Science Physics? This way I only need to take part 2 and 3, instead of 1 & 2 of Life Science Physics (at the same time as part 2 engineering to replace F). One UC has that on Assist only.

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<p>I am pretty sure they will let you replace it as long as it transferable. (Check with engineering majors at assist.org)</p>

<p>Also are you sure you want to major in biology? I would actually take a biology course before deciding that. Also how far a long is your chemistry? If you haven't finished a single bio or chem class, you have a lot of work to get done.</p>

<p>I'm not sure about other schools, but this is the requirement for TAG @ UCI.</p>

<p>Complete one year of general chemistry and lab with a grade of B or better in each
course.
Complete one year of general biology with lab equivalent to UC Irvine's BIO SCI 93,
94, and 100 lab with a grade of C or better in each course.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.admissions.uci.edu/pdf/TAG_brochure_fall2011.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.admissions.uci.edu/pdf/TAG_brochure_fall2011.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>You should probably check directly with the Biology Departments of the UCs you are interested in to make sure they will accept the Physics sequence for physical science and engineering majors as an acceptable alternative to the Physics for Life Sciences sequence. The two courses almost certainly use different textbooks and emphasize different applications of Physics. Why would Biology Departments want a different Physics course for their students if they believed the standard Physics sequence met the needs of Biology majors? I took the three semester Physics sequence for physical science and engineering majors using the Halliday and Resnick textbook and I do not recall a single example or problem in that widely used text that was related to the life sciences.</p>

<p>I can sort of see why you would want to retake Engineering Physics 2 in order to get that F off of your transcript but you need to be honest with yourself about why you failed the class. If you tried your hardest and the material was just too difficult, it is not going to get any easier if you take it again and Physics 3 is considerably more difficult than Physics 2 of that sequence. In addition to studying material more relevant to Biology, you probably have a better chance of passing Physics 1 and 2 for the life sciences than passing Physics 2 and 3 for physical science and engineering majors.</p>

<p>Do you think I should retake the Physics class I had gotten an F in (it should raise my overall GPA from a 3.06 to 3.26)? I'm sure I can at least get a B. Do I need to retake it in or before Fall 2010, for which I am applying, to have an effect? Problem is I won't be able to get a job easily, but I'll try my best.</p>

<p>Whether or not you should retake the Physics class that you failed really depends on why you received an F in it the first time you took it and precisely why you think the outcome would be any different if you took it again. If there was some clearly identifiable reason you got an F the first time such as illness or even not taking the class seriously and failing to study enough than taking it again might not be a bad idea. On the other hand, if the material was just beyond your comprehension despite your best efforts to learn it and you felt totally lost in that class than taking it again might not accomplish much.</p>

<p>You say you are sure you can get a B in the course now but is there a specific reason why you believe that you would do that much better if you took the class again. For example, maybe your math background was weak when you took it the first time but since then you have taken and excelled in Calculus classes for physical science and engineering majors and you now have the math skills required to do well in the Physics class. Before I would retake the class I would want to be sure that I had some reason other than wishful thinking to believe that I had overcome the deficiencies that resulted in the first F.</p>