Ross statistics

<p>Does anyone know the acceptance rate for Ross when you apply normally, as a freshman? If you don't know the exact number, can you tell me how difficult it is to get in, generally? And what about for pre-admittance?
Thanks!</p>

<p>This sort of information is on the Ross website. It is very difficult to get into Ross. Generally speaking, a relatively small top 3 BBA program at one of the nation's elite universities will be very difficult to get into.</p>

<p><a href="http://www.bus.umich.edu/Admissions/bba/RA%20Profile%2009.pdf%5B/url%5D"&gt;http://www.bus.umich.edu/Admissions/bba/RA%20Profile%2009.pdf&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p>

<p>310/734 is not "very difficult". If you can't get into the top 40% in LSA, you are not a smart cookie anyway. </p>

<p>Also, I have only seen 1 out of like 15 engineering friends who didnt get in with a gpa over 3.2.</p>

<p>Ha, sorry for the laziness....
Huh, so about 42%, not bad. Thanks!</p>

<p>Bearcats, the average Michigan student who successfully transfers into Ross has a 3.6 GPA. That is not an easy accomplishment, regardless of major. I would definitely agree that if you are agood student at Michigan, your chances of getting into Ross are reasonable, but I disagree with your claim that students in the top 40% of LSA are somehow guaranteed admission into Ross. That is a very false insinuation. I would say that only students among the top 50% of the LSA class will bother applying to Ross, and of those, 40% are admitted. The top 50% of students at LSA are Ivy calibre students to start with, and a 40% acceptance rate is by no means high when considering the competition.</p>

<p>For pre-admit, it is a very different process altogether. Generally speaking, and I admittedly have not looked at the stats in some time, so bear with me. I read somewhere that 1,200 high school seniors applied to Ross as pre-admits last year and only 250 (20%) or so were accepted. The average SAT score of enrolling pre-admits was 1440 and the average ACT score of enrolling pre-admits was 32. If those figures are correct, then I would safety say that getting into Ross pre-admit is very difficult (as difficult as getting into LSA Honors).</p>

<p>Like I said, getting into a relatively small* top 3 BBA program at an elite university is difficult.</p>

<p>*Ross has only 350 students per class, compared to 600 at Stern or Wharton.</p>

<p>"I would say that only students among the top 50% of the LSA class will bother applying to Ross, and of those, 40% are admitted. "</p>

<p>That's definitely not true. The middle 80% of those accepted has gpa is from 3.2-3.9... Ir remember 3.3 is the average in LSA, which means more than 10% of the people in the admited class comes from below 50th percentile in LSA.
It is reasonable to assume the proportion is much higher in the applicant pool since you would imagine someone in the bottom 50% of LSA has significantly less chance of getting in so it would take a percentage significantly larger than 10% in the applicant pool to contribute 10% to the admitted class. So your assumption is definitely not true.</p>

<p>Again, I am not saying it's easy.. I am saying "very difficult" is a huge exaggeration</p>

<p>bearcats, Ross and LSA Honors are far and away the hardest programs to get into at Michigan. That is a fact. I have no motive for saying this as I was neither enrolled in the Honors College, nor was I ever a student at the Business school. I majored in Economics as a regular LSA student. Your analysis is way off though. Ross is very difficult to get into, whether as an already-existing student at Michigan or as a high school student. I am willing to bet many of the students admitted into Ross with sub 3.4 GPAs are Engineering students. In the CoE, a 3.0-3.3 GPA is equivallent to a 3.3-3.6 GPA in LSA. Now Ross does not breakdown the acceptance stats into its class by college applied from, but I am confident that the majority of Ross admits with sub 3.4 GPAs come from the CoE.</p>

<p>I realize this is anecdotal, but when I was at Michigan back in the early 90s, Econ students with sub 3.3 GPAs had virtually no chance of getting into the Business school (it was not called Ross back then). I certainly knew of no student that got in with a sub 3.3 GPA. And that was 15 years ago, when getting into Ross was not as difficult as it is today.</p>

<p>If I were to estimate the breakdown of applicants from Michigan applying to Ross, I would esimtate that the vast majoroity of applicants to Ross from LSA have 3.3-4.0 GPAs and of those, 40% are admitted. I would estimate that the vast majority of applicants to Ross from the CoE have 3.0-3.7 GPAs, and of those 40% are admitted. Either way, the pool of applicant is of high calibre and the acceptance rate of 40% is low considering the quality of the applicant pool.</p>

<p>for 2009 Ross PA's, 1203 applicants, 250 accepted (21% acceptance), then 95 attended. Only 22% attending are in-state, so .21 x .22 =5% admissions for in state applicants.</p>

<p>So getting into Ross as a in-state PA is harder than getting accepted to HYP.</p>

<p>This calculation could be skewed because we don't know the ratio of in-state/out-state applicants for Ross BBA PA.</p>

<p>But if you are an in-state , this Ross BBA PA like getting a $120,000 scholarship ,difference between paying for Wharton vs UM in-state.</p>

<p>To Alexandre:
"bearcats, Ross and LSA Honors are far and away the hardest programs to get into at Michigan."
That's a true statement. However, I do not believe it is "very difficult". Maybe we have a different difficulty threshold. For instance, it is very easy to get into top 10% of the curve in any LSA classes because of the lack of competition, with the exception of the pre-med dominated classes.
I don't even believe preadmit is "very difficult" to get in. 20% admissions rate is low, but not "very low" compared to the admissions rate at other top universities. You like anecdotal experience, I will give you one. I had a 3.2 gpa (not a great gpa at hotchkiss), wrote a really lame duck essay (remember, Michigan was a safety recommended by my college advisor that I didnt really care about and I still don't understand what I was thinking that led me to come here) and got in.</p>

<p>"Your analysis is way off though."
My statistical analysis is correct. Anecdotal experience and hypothetical assumptions cannot discredit actual statistics. I am just pointing out statistical implications based on the numbers Ross provided.</p>

<p>To collegechecker:
"for 2009 Ross PA's, 1203 applicants, 250 accepted (21% acceptance), then 95 attended. Only 22% attending are in-state, so .21 x .22 =5% admissions for in state applicants."</p>

<p>You need to brush up on your conditional probability. Enough said. You are assuming that being instate is a selection process and therefore forgot a denominator.</p>

<p>The calculation should technically be:
250<em>(instate percetage 1) / 1203</em>(instate percentage 2). </p>

<p>Implications:
If you assume that instate and out of state applicant quality are the same, then instate percentage 1 and instate percentage 2 would be equal and cancel each other out and result in 21%.
This is obviously not true. The instate applicant pool is of lower quality than out of state applicant pool, which would logically imply that instate percentage 1 < instate percentage 2 and result in something slightly less than 22%. But then the lower acceptance rate can then be attributed to the lower quality, as opposed to tighter admissions standard. </p>

<p>"This calculation could be skewed "
It is not skewed. It is wrong. lol</p>

<p>Bearcats, I have friends who attended Hotchkiss back in the late 80s and early 90s, and according to them, only 30% of so of the students at the school had GPAs over 3.3. So that means you were in the top third of the students of one of the country's top 10 high schools. Am I incorrect in assuming that virtually all of the top third of the students at Hotchkiss are admitted into Ivy League universities? </p>

<p>If you want some friendly advice bearcats, downplaying excellence is not an attractive quality. It does not make one seem more cultivated. Give credit where it is due is a sign of good sportsmanship, and that is always valued. At a school like Michigan, when only 40% of the top half of the student body is admitted into a program, it is safe to say that the program is very difficult. Like I said, virtually all of those applicants are good. And the Ross pre-admit stats (20% addmitted, mean SAT over 1440 and mean ACT of 32) are roughly the same as those of students attending Cornell, Duke and Penn. Again, that is no small feat.</p>

<p>but getting into Ross as an in-state student means getting a $210,000 education for $90,000! lol</p>

<p>"If you want some friendly advice bearcats, downplaying excellence is not an attractive quality. "</p>

<p>and when did I "downplay excellence"? I just believe that "very difficult" is an exaggeration. Easy? Definitely not. But very difficult? I dont think so either. Given the fact that it isn't hard at all to do well in LSA, and Ross' willingless to compensate for lower gpa in the COE, I believe that if you at least put <em>some effort</em> in trying to do well at U of M, your chance is good. That's what I am saying. </p>

<p>As I said, maybe we have different threshold of what is "very difficult".</p>

<p>"But if you are an in-state , this Ross BBA PA like getting a $120,000 scholarship ,difference between paying for Wharton vs UM in-state. "
I dont understand your first part of the sentence. If I were in the situation of paying for U of M instate and Wharton right now, I would go to Wharton. Sadly enough this is coming from a student paying out of state tuition at U of M over wharton...ironic huh...</p>

<p>also, our local MI high school has a Ross PA last year, the first ever. This HS has usually four to five Ivy league admits per year and about 10 top twenty school admits every year</p>