SAT grammar quetsion

<p>11.Some philosophers maintain that language is essential to formulating certain [thoughts; others, that] even the most complex thoughts are independent of words.
A.thoughts; others, that
B.thoughts, however, that others maintain that
C.thoughts others suggest that
D.thoughts and that others believe
E.thoughts but others, however,that</p>

<p>The right answer is A. This sentence with A does not make sense to me, could you please analyze it for me ?</p>

<ol>
<li>Although psychologist B.F.[Skinner, who is best known as the man who popularized behaviorism, he] also wrote a utopian novel entitled Walden Two.
B. Skinner, who is best known as the man who popularized behaviorism,
C. Skinner is best known as the man who popularized behaviorism, he</li>
</ol>

<p>Could you tell me why C is better than B?
Thanks a lot!</p>

<ol>
<li>Semi-colons connect two similar ideas. The first sentence's subject is "some philosophers," and the second part begins with "others, that," which is similar to saying "other philosophers think that." </li>
</ol>

<p>In my mind, the sentence ran like this: "Some philosophers think [this]; other philosophers thought that [something else]." All the other answer choices result in a run-on or mis-interpretation of the meaning of what the sentence is actually saying.</p>

<ol>
<li>Since the sentence starts with "Although" (a concessive clause), the sentence must begin with an idea that contrasts the main part of the sentence. Choice B would not complete the clause.</li>
</ol>

<p>I hope these explanations make sense - I'm trying to prepare myself for grammar as well. It was a full 100 points lower than my math section =P</p>

<p>Can anybody help explain this grammar question?</p>

<p>"John Edgar Wideman is regarded [to be] [one of] the most talented writers of the late twentieth century and is often [compared to] such literary giants [as] Ralph Ellison and Richard Wright. [no error]"</p>

<p>The correct answer is [to be]. I thought [as] should be [such as].</p>

<p>The reason why [to be] is correct is because "regarded" is almost always coupled with "as" when used in that context. It's just an idiom.</p>

<p>[as] is not the correct answer because the author already writes "such literary giants," so "such as" would be redundant after that; only "as" is needed after "giants" in order to continue the sentence.</p>

<p>The [to be] should be [as], and since you already have a "such" in the sentence the [as] would stay as it is.</p>

<p>Thanks pneumoconiosis, burgerking316</p>

<p>11 makes no sense to me. Aren't semicolons meant to separate two independent clauses? What makes "others, that even the most complex thoughts are independent of words" an independent clause?</p>

<p>Shouldn't choice A in 11 say "thoughts; others SAY that"
That choice, as of now, makes no sense to me.</p>

<p>These types of questions would NOT appear on the real SAT. I recommend only using the Official SAT Study Guide by the College Board to study.

[quote]
11.Some philosophers maintain that language is essential to formulating certain [thoughts; others, that] even the most complex thoughts are independent of words.
A.thoughts; others, that
B.thoughts, however, that others maintain that
C.thoughts others suggest that
D.thoughts and that others believe
E.thoughts but others, however,that</p>

<p>The right answer is A. This sentence with A does not make sense to me, could you please analyze it for me ?

[/quote]

"others, that even the most complex thoughts are independent of words" is called an elliptical clause. The comma and pause basically substitutes the verb in the previous clause, "maintain": "others maintain that even the most. . . ." Elliptical clauses are certain sentences (clauses) which leave words out that are understood. Here are examples of elliptical clauses:
I am taller than she. (I am taller than she is.)</p>

<p>I feel really bad when running long distances. (I feel really bad when I am running long distances.)</p>

<p>John has three cats; Rosa, four. (John has three cats; Rosa has four.)</p>

<p>I am a good basketball player; she is, too. (I am a good basketball player; she is a good basketball player, too.)</p>

<p>The elliptical clause (or "ellipsis") would NOT appear on the SAT, because it is obscure (not many people use or can identify it), unreasonable (you can't use reasoning to derive it), and grammatically unimportant.</p>