SAT Improving Sentence Question?

<p>In towns throughout Texas, one can taste thousands of types of chili, each with a distinct flavor of its own.</p>

<p>A) each with a distinct flavor of its own
B) each having a distinct flavor of its own
C) while they each have a distinct flavors of their own
D) which has a distinct flavor of its own
E) they each have their own distinct flavor</p>

<p>This is on page 311 on "Manual for the SATs" Princeton Review Book.</p>

<p>Is this sentence is a bit redundant using "distinct/of its own"? =/</p>

<p>I assume that PR deems (A) the answer, correct? Yes, I agree that "of its own" seems redundant, but the other choices are all ungrammatical.</p>

<p>The book does not tell us answers for the Writing section I don't think....I've looked through the whole book =/</p>

<p>Edit:</p>

<p>Why can't it be (B)?</p>

<p>^What's wrong with (B), "each having a distinct flavor of its own"? (directed at silverturtle)</p>

<p>I misread (B); it would also work. Just ignore this question, though.</p>

<p>By the way, I wouldn't call "of its own" redundant. "Distinct" is just an adjective that describes the flavor. It does not indicate possession. "A distinct flavor" could refer to the flavor of an apple. Yet you could attribute that flavor to an apple candy.</p>

<p>
[quote]
"Distinct" is just an adjective that describes the flavor. It does not indicate possession.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>"with" and "having" do, however.</p>

<p>B was my first response.</p>

<p>There's no reason that (A) is better than (B), or vice-versa.</p>

<p>
[quote]
"with" and "having" do, however.

[/quote]

I still wouldn't call it redundant, though, or at least not redundant in the sense that it is incorrect or unideal. For example, you might say, "my own [noun]," or "I cooked my own food" even though "my" already indicates possession.</p>

<p>
[quote]
There's no reason that (A) is better than (B), or vice-versa.

[/quote]

Yet, there's only one correct response.</p>

<p>Well, technically I would consider "I cooked my own food" to be redundant, as "own" serves a merely emphatic purpose there.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Yet, there's only one correct response.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Not necessarily; note that this is a Princeton Review question. :)</p>