SAT Scores for English-speaking international student?

<p>Holla, I've heard that there is a certain degree of leniency regarding the SAT scores for an international applicant who isn't a native English speaker (esp. Critical Reading score), but I was wondering whether there'd be any sort of leniency for native English speakers, ala myself?</p>

<p>Would the fact that I've had to teach myself the test format & familiarise myself with it all be of any importance?</p>

<p>What about the SAT Subject Tests? Seeing as there are discrepancies within subject curriculums between the US and the UK (where I live).</p>

<p>Also, does anyone have any stats regarding SAT scores for people in England/UK? Tyvm in advance.</p>

<p>bumpiautoo</p>

<p>"Would the fact that I've had to teach myself the test format & familiarise myself with it all be of any importance?"</p>

<p>Not really.. the test format is pretty simple!</p>

<p>Honestly, as an native English speakers you should get very high scores.</p>

<p>^Not true, not true...</p>

<p>The SAT does not function as a regular language proficiency test because it is not designed to be one. The SAT is geared toward native English speakers, but even more so toward Americans. What I mean with this statement is that if, hypothetically, you give the SAT to 2 absolutely equally intelligent people, one American and one British, I can guarantee you that the US kid will do better. </p>

<p>The SAT measures the ability to think logically, to examine critically in a short period of time. It does follow certain patterns of thinking, which are more American than European, Asian, or <em>pick whatever region</em>. </p>

<p>I am sure the admissions officers know that, so, while a native English speaker should do better than a non-native English speaker, neither will be held to the absolutely same standards as the Americans.</p>

<p>Don't expect the criteria to be severely lowered though - no one will accept an international student with mediocre scores. ;)</p>

<p>^ I sort of would love if you define mediocre SAT scores, albeit I am a non-native speaker of English</p>

<p>Usually below 650 might be considered mediocre in above context because 1/2 ivys or equal standard colleges cut off sat scores below that but may be not harvard.</p>

<p>Even if the admissions committee were theoretically going to look at the scores of a non-native English speaker or an internation native English speaker with leniency, it wouldn't change the fact that there are a lot of high international SAT testers that fall into both of those categories and that you will still have to outperform them.</p>

<p>What's a high score for an int'l?</p>

<p>"It does follow certain patterns of thinking, which are more American than European'l</p>

<p>Seriously? There are texts following questions, and I think that someone who grew up in an English speaking country is expected to have no difficulty understanding those texts. And you don't have to be an American to undersand the 'patterns of thinking' behind those questions. Just get familiar with the test. I don't say it"s easy but you don't have to be a genius to do that.</p>

<p>Harvard officialy says that they expect scores above 600. But you know, after that, your acceptance will depend on who you are.</p>

<p>Btw, I'm an intl' student whose English isn't my native language. My only real exposure to English was during a 6- -week trip in Boston, three years ago. I was deferred with a 640 on the CR section (I recently scored 720 and hope it will help)</p>

<p>"Harvard officialy says that they expect scores above 600"</p>

<p>? I doubt Harvard would seriously consider someone who scored 1850 on the SAT unless they were athletic phenoms/musical geniuses</p>

<p>Harvard</a> College Admissions § Applying: Frequently Asked Questions</p>

<p>Are there minimum required SAT, ACT, or SAT Subject Test scores?
Harvard does not have clearly defined, required minimum scores; however, the majority of students admitted to the College represent a range of scores from roughly 600 to 800 on each section of the SAT Reasoning Test as well as on the SAT Subject Tests. We regard test results as helpful indicators of academic ability and achievement when considered thoughtfully among many other factors.</p>

<p>"Seriously? There are texts following questions, and I think that someone who grew up in an English speaking country is expected to have no difficulty understanding those texts. And you don't have to be an American to undersand the 'patterns of thinking' behind those questions. Just get familiar with the test. I don't say it"s easy but you don't have to be a genius to do that."</p>

<p>Seriously. I am an international student, too. I have taken the SAT I once and have done well on it, including the CR section. I know what the exam is all about. I have studied in Europe and I have also attended a fairly difficult American international school with all my teachers and curriculum being American. There IS a perceptible difference in the US system of asking questions and in the European one.</p>

<p>I never said that you cannot learn these differences and apply them while taking the test. I say that these differences exist, admissions officers know them and DO take them into account. </p>

<p>Someone asked about a mediocre international score. There really is no definite answer. Harvard does state that most of the students are with scores in the range of six to eight hundred. Don't expect a 3x600 to get you in though. If you have a 600-650 on the CR section (assuming it's the weakest one for internationals), then you'd better have a 100+ TOEFL and 700+ Math and Writing SAT sections to compensate for the CR gap. I think 2100 is the very lowest you should be at, unless you have some stellar EC activity with a good deal of international/national recognition to pique Harvard's interest.</p>

<p>In the end, I am just an applicant, so don't take my word for 100% valid. If anything, all these Ivy's are barely predictable when it comes down to acceptances...</p>

<p>They definitely would be more lenient. I stay in India and from of all my classmates (quite a few brains among them), I'm the only one who scored above 700 in the CR and Writing sections (most of them speak English most of the time). As long as you do well in Math & score above 650 in the others, I think they would still 'consider you'. & I've never heard of anyone in India getting above 2200.</p>

<p>But then again, I'm just an applicant, not an admissions officer. Just ask a student at Harvard if you can, I'm sure that would help.</p>

<p>@rsiddhant, well, that's kinda beside the point, because I'm really just talking about international students who speak English as their first language.</p>

<p>@Moonpie: don't expect them to be lenient with you. Every year the applicant pool gets tougher and tougher. SATs are just ONE part of the whole application process, and arguably the most basic one as well. If you're counting on this one part to boost your chances, I'd advise you to keep working on other areas that actually have the ability to show your unique qualities. Plus, I'm not even sure if they'll care about your state of "nativeness" until perhaps the last stages of admissions when you're held against another similar applicant vying for the same spot in Harvard.</p>

<p>
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& I've never heard of anyone in India getting above 2200

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go through the indian thread, you'll find many.

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I doubt Harvard would seriously consider someone who scored 1850 on the SAT unless they were athletic phenoms/musical geniuses

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somewhere, i found that a chineese with 1700ish got in. She had a "desperate" story though. And I have known many students taking full IB course and doing very good: 2/3/4 below perfect score out of 45, get in with 1800ish sat scores into Mit, stanford and so on. may be even harvard.

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Seriously. I am an international student, too. I have taken the SAT I once and have done well on it, including the CR section.

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i second that, with only 20 days of practice i increased CR scores by 70. Thats not great but many have got more and its all about practice with right material. There is no such thing as pattern of thinking. Truely, collegeboard says that even american highschool students have never learned CR skills.</p>

<p>^College Board says many other things that are not true either...
My CR improved by 170 points in several months with the preparation they claim to be hardly effective. :D</p>