SAT Subject tests only for Ivy league?

<p>Are SAT subject tests only for those that want to get into Ivy League/ really good schools? I know a lot of normal colleges don't require them, so is that true?</p>

<p>Also, if it is true, doesn't that mean that if you score middle 50%, that means you're middle 50% compared to all of those that are applying to Ivy League/top notch schools?</p>

<p>Anyone know?</p>

<p>Anyone can take them, but if you don't want to, just check the websites of the schools that you are interested in and see if they require SAT II's. Some do, some don't.</p>

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Also, if it is true, doesn't that mean that if you score middle 50%, that means you're middle 50% compared to all of those that are applying to Ivy League/top notch schools?

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<p>Sort of. Since you get to choose what subject test you are going to take and not everyone takes them, you are competing against a more self-selecting group of students. But it's not like they are reserved only for ivy hopefuls, anyone can take any test.</p>

<p>What kind of schools do you plan on applying to?</p>

<p>Cornell University. I've been taking practice Subject tests and I got (from the blue book, the "official practice guide for all subject tests") a 770 in Chemistry and an 800 (barely) in Math, oh and a 630 in US history. Knowing my luck though, I would be jumping if I got those scores on the real thing. Cornell takes 2 subject tests, so I hope the US History score won't hurt my chances.</p>

<p>I've sent them to 4 schools, U of I at Urbana Champaign, Northwestern and Cornell, and Carnige Mellon. (The pre-send thing, for free)</p>

<p>Well, I guess it's true that anyone can take them, but why would anyone take them if their school doesn't need them? I know at my school, only those that were applying to selective schools took them. 95% of the people at my school (some of them competing for Valedictorian) had no idea what they were.</p>

<p>Only Cornell really wanted the Subject tests though.</p>

<p>some non-ivy leagues definitely require them, like UVA. They can also be used (though not as often anymore) to exempt courses in college too.</p>