Schools similar to WASHU

In looking for colleges/universities to apply to, one my top choices at the moment is WASHU, largely in part to their PNP (Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy) major. I love how interdisciplinary it is, however I know the major is quite unique. Does anyone know of schools with similar programs/majors?

Most T20s (Brown, Duke, Vanderbilt etc.) will allow you to create your own major (the requirements and processes differ) if the major you are interested in is not available. These schools will usually allow you to double, or even triple major if interested, though you’ll likely have to complete the requirements for each major independently with likely some overlap between Psychology and Neuroscience.)

Brown has a Cognitive Neuroscience concentration (major) that you might be interested in, as it’s description indicates it’s an “integrative area of study drawing primarily from cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, and linguistics.” Brown has a Philosophy concentration as well, and the freedom of the Open Curriculum makes it extremely easy to double concentrate—~20% of undergraduates do!

Brown’s Cognitive Neuroscience concentration: https://bulletin.brown.edu/the-college/concentrations/cogn/

Brown’s Philosophy concentration: https://bulletin.brown.edu/the-college/concentrations/phil/

Hope that helps! Good luck with admissions!

Here are some recommendations for schools on the smaller-side that have strong undergraduate curricula IMO. Most liberal arts colleges have small student bodies and even smaller graduate student populations.

While utterly useless for most purposes, US News’s Rankings ARE helpful for finding schools, whether by student-body size, location etc.

Note: The classifications are based on your stats being competitive for WashU, though definitely research each school in further detail.

Reach: Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island;) Dartmouth College (Hanover, New Hampshire;) Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tennessee;) Amherst College (Amherst, MA;) Barnard College, if female (New York, New York;) and Pomona College (Claremont, California.)

Match: University of Rochester (Rochester, New York;) Tulane University (New Orleans, Louisiana;) Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio;) and Reed College (Portland, Oregon.)

Safeties: Oberlin College (Oberlin, Ohio;) Lewis and Clark College (Portland, Oregon;) Juniata College (Huntingdon, Pennsylvania;) Allegheny College (Meadsville, Pennsylvania;) Trinity University (San Antonio, Texas;) and Southwestern University (Georgetown, Texas.)

Hope that helps! Good luck with admissions!

A neuroscience major, by itself, typically relies on research from the disciplines of psychology, biology and chemistry, and further connects these disciplines to those of philosophy, math and computer science. For this reason I think you can comfortably broaden your college search to include schools without a specially designated interdisciplinary program such as PNP.

Northeastern has a behavioral neuroscience and philosophy major, BU has a combined philosophy and neuroscience degree.

Many schools, even those outside the T20s as pikachu suggested, will allow you to design your own major. It should be fairly straightforward to approximate Washu’s PNP major at many schools.

Some schools that are similar to washu where you could create your own PNP major are U Rochester, JHU, and CWRU.

I just answered in your other thread, but look at U Rochester and CWRU as similar to Washu but less selective. You can design your own major to approximate PNP at many schools.

Also worth looking at but still pretty selective are Wake Forest, Emory.

More: SMU, Brandeis, Tulane, William and Mary, Fordham.

Many of the schools in post #3 are not similar to washu, at all.

Currently, WASHU is my top choice for college. Some of the aspects I have found myself attracted to are the emphasis the university places on academics but also collaboration between students. I also love it’s proximity to Forest Park and downtown St. Louis, while also being in the Midwest. Their PNP (Psychology, Nueroscience, and Philosophy) is another big reason I’m interested in WASHU, I love the unique interdisciplinary nature of the program. I’d consider myself a competitive applicant, however I’m struggling to find schools that share a large quantity of qualities I love about WASHU that would be considered target or safety schools. Any input/ideas you may have would be greatly appreciated.

And to my class of 2021 buddies out there trying to figure out our futures in simply chaotic times, good luck with applications this fall!

Without addressing the specific major, the most common overlap schools with WashUStL are:

University of Chicago, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, Rice, Cornell, Duke, Stanford, & Yale according to the Fiske Guide To Colleges 2020.

Most surprising to me is that Emory University in Atlanta is not on this list. Emory University deserves a serious look based on your stated interests, in my opinion.

P.S. Not trying to start a debate, but I find the schools in post #3 above to be intriguing & very helpful. In fact, all of the posts in this thread appear to be helpful.

OP asked for target and safety schools like Washu.

@Mwfan1921 : OP started two threads. The thread starter does not ask for target & safety schools, but they are important. Also, OP can expand his or her college search by compiling a list of schools thought by most to be similar to WashUStL.

No right or wrong answers, just different approaches.

I like @pikachurocks15 's list but these days I don’t think that Tulane, CWRU, and Reed are matches, nor is Oberlin a safety. I would classify these as lower reaches and a match respectively

U of Richmond might be worth a look in the low reach category.

Spot on! Older brother has a PhD in Neuro Psychology and his career has been focused on solving problems in the crosshairs of human behavior (what) and biology/chemistry (why). The testing of those solutions is realized in stats modeling, comp science, etc. Very interesting field with tons of every day applications.