Sister Wives TV

<p>Okay I am a fan of Big Love. It is just wacky enough for me...last night I watched the first episode of TLC's Sister Wives...I am not sure I am going to be a regular watcher but it was interesting. Seems to really show how the multiple wives think. It seems in this family the original polygamy idea came from the first wife and the husband happily went along. I wonder if that is usually the case in these families?<br>
Anybody else watch this?</p>

<p>My daughter and I watched this the other night. The previews just blew her 18 year old mind and she had to record it for later viewing. Her take on the whole thing, they seem completely normal, haha. I told her they ARE normal, they just choose to live there life in a different way. I feel the same way about polygamists as I do about any other person who chooses to live differently than I do, as long as they are not hurting anybody, what they do in their own home is their business. The situation portrayed in Sister Wives is much different than the cults that marry off 13 & 14 year old girls to adult men.</p>

<p>fishymom, agreed. All three women stated that they chose each other, there were no arranged marriages in the group.</p>

<p>Isn't this family/show being investigated? I thought I heard on the news that authorities are checking on the legality of this and that show might be cancelled/postponed, esp since this is reality TV?</p>

<p>Why is it that polygamous families are always comprised of a husband with multiple wives? Where is the wife with five or six husbands?</p>

<p>
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Her take on the whole thing, they seem completely normal, haha. I told her they ARE normal, they just choose to live there life in a different way.

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</p>

<p>Remove any kind of moral judgment from the word-this situation is certainly not "normal" in that it certainly deviates from the norm. I wouldn't call polygamous families "normal," yet that doesn't necessarily mean there is anything wrong with it.</p>

<p>I've read a number of memoirs from wives who've lived in such families.</p>

<p>I wonder if this show portrays the "typical" polygamous family?</p>

<p>For one thing, they appear to be financially well off, which is a good thing when you are supporting so many children.</p>

<p>The show has also not yet discussed the religious motivation for multiple wives. According to Fundamentalist Mormon doctrine, the practice of plural marriage "qualifies a man for godhood. His future kingdom will be increased more by having many wives and children." (I seem to recall four wives being the minimum for godhood, which may play into Kody's motivation for taking a fourth wife.)</p>

<p>The readings I've done have also portrayed a very strict authoritarian hierarchy in the Fundamentalist Mormon church. The leading authorities in the church often play a role in who marries whom, which in turn can influence one's standing in the church. There was no evidence of this in the first episode of "Sister Wives," but it could still play role in the family's lives.</p>

<p>Fendrock, that is my perception. The books I've read do not portray marriages where people freely chose each other. They have portrayed communities where young under-age girls are treated like objects to be assigned, the women are very oppressed both in their homes and in their communities. It seems to me that this show found a non-typical family, more like the family in Big Love, where everyone freely chose to be there and where the women were fully-formed consenting adults who made adult decisions to be in this marriage. I think it's a very important distinction.</p>

<p>
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Why is it that polygamous families are always comprised of a husband with multiple wives? Where is the wife with five or six husbands?

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</p>

<p>Especially in light of mounting anthropological evidence that men are mentally hard-wired and even physically adapted to share a single sexual partner amongst them.</p>

<p>Quote:
Why is it that polygamous families are always comprised of a husband with multiple wives? Where is the wife with five or six husbands? </p>

<p>Good Lord, one husband is more than enough for me!!! Might as well have a few more kids. Now, a few more wives...wouldn't sound too bad at times, haha!</p>

<p>Quote:
Her take on the whole thing, they seem completely normal, haha. I told her they ARE normal, they just choose to live there life in a different way. </p>

<p>"Remove any kind of moral judgment from the word-this situation is certainly not "normal" in that it certainly deviates from the norm. I wouldn't call polygamous families "normal," yet that doesn't necessarily mean there is anything wrong with it."</p>

<p>I think she meant that the husband, wives, kids seemed normal, like if she met them and didn't know their circumstances, she wouldn't know they were different. I certainly don't think there situation is normal!</p>

<p>Polyandrous societies are rare. I recall an anthropologist acquaintance as reporting that they are most likely to develop in environments where it takes the effort of more than one man to support a single woman and her children.</p>

<p>I read recently that polyandry is catching on in those rural cultures where there's just not that much available land around anymore. Instead of giving the whole parcel to eldest son and #2 and #3 take off, all 3 share the land - and the wife.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Why is it that polygamous families are always comprised of a husband with multiple wives? Where is the wife with five or six husbands?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I think I know the reason... Can you imagine doing 6 loads of laundry and folding 6 baskets of undies and socks (not counting the kids')? :)</p>

<p>
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I think I know the reason... Can you imagine doing 6 loads of laundry and folding 6 baskets of undies and socks (not counting the kids')?

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</p>

<p>Good point!!!LOL. Of course, if I could pull off having multiple husbands, surely I could pull off delegating the laundry detail to the HUSBANDS. Because I'd be way too tired to deal with that.</p>

<p>I just saw an internet poll which asked "How often do you do laundry?"</p>

<p>The choices were: Once a week
Once every two weeks
Less often</p>

<p>I was outraged:) No option for "multiple loads per day." Between myself, DH, and DD (school uniform, after school sports clothes, after sports and shower wear, and pajamas), I feel like that's all I ever do sometimes. When other DD (also three sport athlete) lived at home, it was even worse. And that's with only two children.</p>

<p>I would never have multiple husbands just due to the laundry alone!! My husband and son wear 4 times the amount of clothes as my daughter and I. My husband says it is because we are smaller, but I say it is because the males change clothes way too often!!</p>

<p>Besides that, I already have a husband that doesn't listen and is clueless as to what goes on in the house; why would I want more of him ;-) If you are reading, I love you honey!!</p>

<p>
[quote]
Polyandrous societies are rare. I recall an anthropologist acquaintance as reporting that they are most likely to develop in environments where it takes the effort of more than one man to support a single woman and her children.

[/quote]

[quote]
I read recently that polyandry is catching on in those rural cultures where there's just not that much available land around anymore. Instead of giving the whole parcel to eldest son and #2 and #3 take off, all 3 share the land - and the wife.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Spot on. The Nyinba of Tibet and Nepal practice fraternal polyandry because the soil is so poor that it takes several men to work to farm enough for one family. I can't copy and paste the section from my Sociology book, but there's a partial explanation [url=<a href="http://www.everyculture.com/South-Asia/Nyinba-Marriage-and-Family.html%5Dhere.%5B/url"&gt;http://www.everyculture.com/South-Asia/Nyinba-Marriage-and-Family.html]here.[/url&lt;/a&gt;]&lt;/p>

<p>After watching one of these episodes, I have to say it's kind of surreal. </p>

<p>Why on earth would these women participate in this show? Don't they realize that most people think they are absolutely insane? </p>

<p>Can't understand the appeal of that "lifestyle" at all. No offense to CC posters that have sister wives. ;)</p>

<p>Actually I think it is more understandable that these women would participate than some who are in other reality shows.</p>

<p>They could be motivated because of the opportunity to educate the public on what they see as the positive aspects of their lifestyle.</p>

<p>"All three women stated that they chose each other, there were no arranged marriages in the group."</p>

<p>Arranged marriages aren't the opposite of marriages of choice. Arranged marriages can be quite voluntary when they involve adult participants with real alternatives and real power to say no. (This kind of marriage still takes place among educated, city people in India and Japan, among other places, as well as in some Orthodox Jewish communities in Israel and the U.S..) </p>

<p>The problem with the Warren Jeffs FLDS group isn't arranged marriages. It's both the youth of the participants in some of the marriages and the fact that the "assignments" are coerced; you can't say no and continue to function in the community.</p>

<p>I agree that this group of women appeared to be at peace with polygamy.</p>

<p>Hm. Dpends on a society's take on children.</p>

<p>If a society needs children obviously polyandry is not the way to go Also is pretty much negates the idea of patrilineal society, which we don't quite seem ready for, though our society is not in want of children.</p>