social circles

<p>do high-school type social rifts exist at princeton? i'd think they wouldn't, but preview definitely seemed to be pretty stratified.</p>

<p>I think you mean "real-world type social rifts."</p>

<p>High school isn't all that unique.</p>

<p>well seeing how we haven't really experienced the real world before, "existing in high school" is the closest characterization available. so it's a yes? very much yes, sort of, a little?</p>

<p>Yes they exist to a certain extent. There are jocks, theater people, math nerds, debaters, etc., and these divisions can be reinforced by the eating clubs. I don't know what your high school experience was like, but at Princeton these groups don't actively avoid or attempt to marginalize each other. People just tend to associate with others who have similar interests.</p>

<p>It's a natural "circle," not a clique. In other words, very few will exclude you (not more than anywhere else, and, from what I've experienced, less actually). But obviously you're probably going to develop a friendship circle through common activities/classes/dorms, just like anywhere else.</p>

<p>Look up "the Tribe"</p>

<p>^^ Didn't the Tribe disband before the end of this past school year?</p>

<p>Do these "circles of friends" still carry into the Eating Clubs during junior and senior year?</p>

<p>Depends on if you want to be in a sign-in or bicker club. Groups of friends often bicker the same club, and the group invariably gets split up based on who gets in and who doesn't.</p>

<p>If someone stops being your friend because they're not in the same eating club as you, then they weren't very good friends to begin with.</p>

<p>In short, this isn't something you should be worrying about.</p>

<p>Groups of friends can also sign in to the same club, if they absolutely wanted to stay together.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If someone stops being your friend because they're not in the same eating club as you, then they weren't very good friends to begin with.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>That's not really what I was trying to say. The idea is that people in eating clubs generally spend a lot of time in their club interacting with their fellow club members and spend less time interacting with those in other clubs. When a group of friends bickers one club and only some people in the group get in, the nature of the club system pretty much guarantees that those who got in will continue to spend a lot of time with each other while not spending as much time with the people who got hosed. It's not as if anyone is making the conscious decision to cut off a friendship.</p>