some writing q's

<p>The candidate [called for] medical insurance reform, but to me he seemed less interested in the plight of the uninsured citizens [than in] whether [enough is] [registered] to vote.</p>

<p>[At the reception [were] the [chattering] guests, the three-tiered cake, and the lively music that have become [characteristic of] many wedding celebrations.</p>

<p>Which one is better and why?</p>

<p>The name "transferware" [comes from a nineteenth-century technique for which] a pattern is engraved onto a copper roll, printed on tissue paper, and transferred onto earthenware dishes.
The name "transferware" [comes from a nineteenth-century technique whereby] a pattern is engraved onto a copper roll, printed on tissue paper, and transferred onto earthenware dishes.</p>

<p>Bertha Lamma received her engineering degree in [1893, specializing as her profession] in the design of motors and generators.
Bertha Lamma received her engineering degree in [1893 and, as a professional, specialized] in the design of motors and generators.</p>

<p>Thanks!</p>

<p>1) Enough is. Citizens is plural, so the verb should be plural too.</p>

<p>2) I think that has no error.</p>

<p>3) The second one. "For which" really doesn't make sense. It isn't logical to claim that the pattern is engraved for the technique.</p>

<p>4) The second one. (Not 100% sure about this one.)</p>

<p>
[quote]
The candidate [called for] medical insurance reform, but to me he seemed less interested in the plight of the uninsured citizens [than in] whether [enough is] [registered] to vote.

[/quote]

Here is a revised version of what the grammatically incorrect original sentence means (I will mark my additions and changes in bold):
"The candidate called for medical insurance reform, but to me he seemed less interested in the plight of the uninsured citizens than he was in whether enough uninsured citizens is registered to vote."
These two changes are implied and can be omitted like in the original sentence. From the revised version you can see that "enough . . . citizens" is plural, not singular. So the answer is (C) "enough is" because it should be "enough are":</p>

<p>CORRECT: The candidate called for medical insurance reform, but to me he seemed less interested in the plight of the uninsured citizens than in whether enough are registered to vote.</p>

<p>
[quote]
[At the reception [were] the [chattering] guests, the three-tiered cake, and the lively music that have become [characteristic of] many wedding celebrations.

[/quote]

No error. "Characteristic" as an adjective basically means "typical." The three things listed are typical traits of many wedding celebrations; they are typical of them; they are characteristic of them. You can ALSO say that they are **characteristics<a href="noun">/b</a> of them.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Which one is better and why?</p>

<p>The name "transferware" [comes from a nineteenth-century technique for which] a pattern is engraved onto a copper roll, printed on tissue paper, and transferred onto earthenware dishes.
The name "transferware" [comes from a nineteenth-century technique whereby] a pattern is engraved onto a copper roll, printed on tissue paper, and transferred onto earthenware dishes.

[/quote]

The second one is correct. "Whereby" means "by which." Mentioning a technique whereby a pattern is engraved into a copper roll implies that a person can engrave a pattern into a copper roll by using the technique. It does not make sense to say that a person can engrave a pattern into a copper roll for the technique, which is precisely what "a technique for which..." implies.</p>

<p>Here are some examples of similar structures:</p>

<p>"I have a table on which I do a lot of my homework."
Implication: I do a lot of my homework on the table. ("Which" refers to the table.)</p>

<p>"There is a huge park next to my house through which I ride my bike a lot."
Implication: I ride my bike a lot through the huge park next to my house. ("Which" refers to the park.)</p>

<p>"I have a very strict and unforgiving teacher because of whom I got my first C in high school."
Implication: I got my first C (grade) in high school because of a very strict and unforgiving teacher. ("Whom" refers to the teacher.)</p>

<p>"There are three possible techniques that you can use. The first technique is very poor, the second technique is decent, and the third technique is the best and the most efficient. Hence, the third technique is a technique by which you can achieve the best results."
Implication: One can achieve the best results by [using the] third technique.</p>

<p>
[quote]
Bertha Lamma received her engineering degree in [1893, specializing as her profession] in the design of motors and generators.
Bertha Lamma received her engineering degree in [1893 and, as a professional, specialized] in the design of motors and generators.</p>

<p>Thanks!

[/quote]

The second one is correct. It says that Bertha Lamme received her engineering degree in 1893, and that she specialized in the design of motors and generators. The first one is incorrect because "as her profession" does not fit. In this case it modifies "Lamme," but Lamme is a person, not a profession. It is like saying "I am specializing in the design of motors and generators as a profession." "I" is not a profession. There is no other noun that can be modified by that. My explanation may be hard for you to understand. I can't quite explain or verbalize it, sorry.</p>