Suggestions for job applications

<p>I've been collecting apps for a position I need to fill which involves lots of detail-oriented work, time sensitive stuff coming all at once, dealing with irate/needy/confused/rushed customers, etc. I've noticed just a few things from the 60 apps I've received that are more and more annoying to me every time it happens.</p>

<p>1) Read the ad and address the things it stresses as important. If you're asked for a letter of interest, a paragraph won't cut it.
2) If you're supposed to submit electronically, DO NOT send/fax a hard copy, too.
3) If technology is an important factor, make sure your attachments open and are in a common format.
4) If you're asked for multiple things (CV, letter, letters of reference, etc.), make sure it's there in the order mentioned, but don't put it all in separate documents.<br>
5) Don't add things that aren't asked for. If you think they're important, mentioned them in a cover letter. You can provide supporting documentation later if it's needed.
6) put your name in the file name of any attachments, not the name of the company/job
7) Don't put important info in the e-mail text that is not also included in the attachment. </p>

<p>I've just spent half a day saving files that all have the same name, only half of which include the applicant's name, and apps from 60+ people each with 1-5 attachments. I am so grateful to the people who combined everything. In some cases the e-mails are very perfunctory (please find attached), in others they contain important info, so I have to save both. </p>

<p>It is going to be very easy to weed out a large number of people very quickly, but then they'll wonder why they weren't considered for the final cut.</p>

<p>Another thing I did to check for the "attention to detail" trait was to send the announcement from one e-mail and ask them to submit applications to another. Brownie points for those that did it right, none for those who just replied to the e-mail. </p>

<p>What other ideas do you have?</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you're asked for multiple things (CV, letter, letters of reference, etc.), make sure it's there in the order mentioned, but don't put it all in separate documents.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>
[quote]
Another thing I did to check for the "attention to detail" trait was to send the announcement from one e-mail and ask them to submit applications to another.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>How is anyone supposed to know that separate documents aren't okay, and how could it possibly matter what order they're in? Your method for weeding resumes is to make unreasonable demands and try to trick people into responding to the wrong email, and your looking for "more ideas"---God bless those poor applicants!</p>

<p>You could use a recruiting software service for the resume submissions that'll aggregate all of the docs together for the applicant and perform other organizational tasks. If you do a search you'll find many services in the results.</p>

<p>I think you're asking too much, and you might rule out some very good candidates by applying standards that don't seem reasonable.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you're supposed to submit electronically, DO NOT send/fax a hard copy, too.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Sometimes, applicants have to fight with the electronic submission system to get it to work, and they may not be sure that their electronic submission was successful. (Ironically, one of my kids had this problem when applying to Microsoft, of all places!) Mailing or faxing a hard copy seems to be a reasonable way to ensure that the company receives your information no matter what.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If technology is an important factor, make sure your attachments open and are in a common format.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Why do they have to be in a common format? I have never seen a job application that specified that all attachments had to be of the same type. Nor do I understand why this would be important. If my resume is in a Word file and my writing sample is in a PDF file, where's the problem?</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you're asked for multiple things (CV, letter, letters of reference, etc.), make sure it's there in the order mentioned, but don't put it all in separate documents.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I've never seen a job application that asked for the documents to be combined. It would never have occurred to me to combine them, and if I had been asked to do so, I would have had difficulty doing it because I don't have access to full Acrobat. Moreover, the bigger the documents get, the more likely that the electronic submission system will not accept them. </p>

<p>May I suggest a different idea: If any of the materials *written by the applicants themselves<a href="not%20their%20letters%20of%20recommendation%20from%20others">/i</a> have errors in spelling, grammar, or punctuation, throw them out.</p>

<p>Let me be clear. I am NOT eliminating people because of this. They are annoyances to me that I thought might be helpful in other circumstances. This is not some arcane submission system that may or may not work correctly (where sending a follow up copy by another means would make sense). It is simple e-mail with attachments that is immediately acknowledged. </p>

<p>It is a job that requires almost solely dealing with electronic communications. This is one way of learning how aware someone might be of the various ramifications of electronic communication and transactions. Someone sending several attachments instead of putting them all in one document has not realized (or been put in a situation where it was an issue) that what is not problematic with one or a few submissions because a problem when 60+ people do it. Not including your name in the file name causes problems when the person to whom you're sending the document has saved a bunch of attachments and they are all titled "Resume" with no further identifier. </p>

<p>I am using it as one piece of information to direct my questioning later on about the person's experience with large quantities of electronic communication. </p>

<p>You better believe I will be looking at spelling/grammar/punctuation, including all the documents asked for, how well the cover letter addresses the characteristics requested in the ad. I just haven't gotten to that stage yet. </p>

<p>Another pet peeve: when the person addresses the e-mail to me as Dear Tango14, but writes Dear Tango15.</p>

<p>When hundreds of people are applying for a job, this kind of consideration is not inconsequential. It involves the applicant thinking about how the recipient will view/use what he/she is sending. If it's obvious from what is sent that the person didn't read the ad carefully, misspells the recipient's name, etc. that application isn't going to get the same consideration as someone who makes it easy for the recipient to find the information they're looking for. For instance, that attachment that doesn't have the candidate's name in the file name, may never be opened again if there are hundreds of applicants, simply because it is easier to just go with the names that can be matched to other documents.</p>

<p>
[quote]
If you're asked for multiple things (CV, letter, letters of reference, etc.), make sure it's there in the order mentioned, but don't put it all in separate documents.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I think this is somewhat unreasonable (the other rquirements are OK), since you are eliminating applicants based on their access to software which allows them to combine documents that were originally created in different formats. </p>

<p>I deal with massive amounts of email messages that can have up to 10 (or even more!) attachments, some with really bizzare names. It does not take a lot of effort for me to select all attachments and then save them all at once in a newly created, appropriately named folder. Sometimes, I also use this trick: instead of saving the attachments, I save the original Outlook email (go to File-> Save as -> select Outlook Message Format from the "Save as type" drop down menu -> type whatever you want into the "file name" box" and click Save). The resulting file will open in Outlook as any other Outlook email message with all of the attachments still securely attached to it.</p>