The Ivy League and Investment Banking

<p>Strictly speaking, what combination of ivy league school and major would be best for job placement in wall street?</p>

<p>I'll start...Cornell University....Applied Economics and Management</p>

<p>Are you serious?</p>

<p>UPENN UG WHARTON BS FINANCE.</p>

<p>Harvard-Yale-Princeton-Wharton Joint Degree in Economics, Math, Engineering, Finance, Accounting & Pottery</p>

<p>hahahahaa lol, and a JD/MBA/master's in finance/master's in economics/masters in engineering</p>

<p>Harvard Econ
Wharton BS Finance + BSE in any engineering
Princeton ORFE</p>

<p>But what about Cornell AEM, that'll work. Right?</p>

<p>berkeley - underwater basket weaving with starcraft electives</p>

<p>how about brown's applied math + econ?</p>

<p>What is ORFE at Princeton? None of the people in my analyst class from Princeton had studied anything that I could think that might stand for.</p>

<p>Oral and Rectal Financial Experimentation...take from it what you will</p>

<p>
[quote]
What is ORFE at Princeton? None of the people in my analyst class from Princeton had studied anything that I could think that might stand for.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>Although I'm not 100% sure, I think this stands for Operations Research and Financial Engineering</p>

<p>This was not difficult: princeton</a> orfe - Google Search</p>

<p>either wharton/finance or something you enjoy that you are good at. i have friends who majored in philosophy or history and got into i-banking. the bulge bracket firms put you through their training programs and don't care much what you learnt in college, only that you excelled and know how to think.</p>

<p>~ TM</p>

<p>^ just imagine where that philosophy major would have ended up if he hadn't gotten that job in ibanking. lol</p>

<p>brown's applied math-econ?</p>

<p>so will Cornell's AEM work?</p>

<p>Yes. I also replied to your other thread. My kid, btw, isn't even AEM.</p>

<p>brown applied math-econ def sends kids to banks. anecdotally, the only person i know concentrating (majoring) in that interned with me at goldman (for what it's worth, i'm double concentrating in econ and public policy)</p>

<p>If one is poor then hardcore math and hardcore economics including ORFE. </p>

<p>If a student is rich and connected, to increase GPA students tend to graduate in government, history, Philosophy, literature etc. They tend to keep their GPA very high through easier course load. Through family connections and their money, they get lucrative summer internships. And road gets easier after that. </p>

<p>Let us see for a rich kid, if family puts $10 million in investment with the firm and firm make say 10% on this money that means $1,000,000 in profit. After taking 2 and 20 firm still makes (2% of 10 million is = 200,000 and 20% of the $1 million profit is = 200,000). The investment firm has no problem paying this intern $100,000 as the firm still makes $300,000 on profit. This is a game in favor of firm. Why the firm will not hire this person over other who brings no money to the company?</p>

<p>For parents, they have to invest money some place, so why not invest in a company, which gives their kid a break. It is a win-win situation for parent, kid, and the investment firm. Life is never fair, remember that. </p>

<p>For 5 to 7 well-connected kid, firm has to hire a top brain that will increase the profit. It is a game.</p>

<p>That was one of the reason why there were so many fund of funds and hedge funds who were investing in other hedge funds mushroomed in last few years.</p>