the sciences at DS

<p>I am a sophomore and very interested in DS, as the college seems to be based off of cultural and academic philosophies which I am very much in agreement with. </p>

<p>However, my scholarly areas of expertise have typically been in math and physics (though I completely understand and see the value of a liberal arts education). I am aware that at DS students can take a independent studies in high level math and science courses, but do they get a full experience should they choose to do so? i.e. could someone walk away from DS, and major in math 2 years later?</p>

<p>Yes.</p>

<p>Depending on the student, his desire to take a lot of independent studies could be seen as solipsism; his independent studies might be rejected.</p>

<p>That would be a rare circumstance, though.</p>

<p>Good luck, should you decide to apply.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I am a sophomore and very interested in DS, as the college seems to be based off of cultural and academic philosophies which I am very much in agreement with.</p>

<p>However, my scholarly areas of expertise have typically been in math and physics (though I completely understand and see the value of a liberal arts education). I am aware that at DS students can take a independent studies in high level math and science courses, but do they get a full experience should they choose to do so? i.e. could someone walk away from DS, and major in math 2 years later?

[/quote]
</p>

<p>lol, try first learning not to write like a pretentious a**.</p>

<p>I bet that Deep Springs attracts more students with interests in philosophy and literature, but do they actually prefer these students? For example, as applicants provide a reading list, would they be turned off by a list without Plato, Heidegger, Camus...? If you write your essay (specifically, the intellectual experience one) about science, are the readers going to be uninterested? I'm just thinking aloud.</p>

<p>Many DSers go on to science/math/cs majors at Berkeley, the Ivies, UC, Michigan, etc. You won't have as many science options as you would at a big university, though, because the student body is tiny and lab facilities are modest. Go to DS because you want the whole unique (and tuition-free) experience, not because you want to accelerate your science studies.</p>

<p>I am not questioning whether I want the DS experience. I am asking whether DS wants someone interested in the sciences who has little background in philosophy.</p>

<p>people from the college have gone on to be famous engineers, mathematicians, and computer scientists</p>

<p>Deep</a> Springs College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</p>

<p>wow, I am pretty embarrassed that I wrote this, and that it was read over 1,000 times. shame this doesn't website allow me to delete it. half of the brightest kids from our generation will be virtually barred from public office by the embarrassing e-trails they left behind.</p>