Turning Down Ross

<p>Hey guys, </p>

<p>I've been admitted to Ross, and I was wondering, do you guys think its stupid for me to turn it down? I know that for people w/o experience, doing so will be stupid, but I'm someone who had relevant internships in IB and VC. </p>

<p>I'm really only looking for thoughts from giants, number1, bearcats and Alexandre. </p>

<p>Thanks</p>

<p>Then maybe you should have PMed them.</p>

<p>Let me get this straight: You just finished your freshman year of college and you already have completed both investment banking and venture capital internships? Could you please elaborate on exactly what you did in these "internships"? I don't mean to trivialize your experiences, but whenever I've heard of people who had "internships in high finance" before college, they didn't do anything substantial.</p>

<p>Is your goal to get into investment banking after you graduate? If so, even if you have already done something fairly substantial, you're going to want to build on those experiences in subsequent summers to make your resume the best it can be (and the best way to do so would be by utilizing Ross's resources). This all depends on how competitive you want to be come full time recruiting, though. In which other areas are you interested? Are you passionate about economics? Engineering? Art? Underwater basket weaving?</p>

<p>I'm interested in psychology so I'm gonna stay in LSA to do psychology.
As for the internships, Ross doesn't give you an advantage for sophomore recruiting anyways and yes, I had substantial work for IB and VC (family relatives are partners/MDs).</p>

<p>bearcats, alexandre, number 1?</p>

<p>
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As for the internships, Ross doesn't give you an advantage for sophomore recruiting anyways

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<p>citigroup, jpmorgan, ubs, and morgan stanley all recruit for their sophomore rotationals out of ross and not lsa. The programs are "diversity focused" but i know several white guys from ross who got interviews at jpm, citi, and ubs. Plus it helps a ton for networking into roles at smaller places, though you dont seem to have that problem i guess.</p>

<p>Also, I can understand maybe wanting to turn down ross for math/econ despite the recruiting hit you would take there (especially if your interest is in trading), but psych? Even at harvard recruiters dont take that major too seriously.</p>

<p>Based on your last post it sounds like you've made up your mind already anyway and are just looking for someone to reassure you, especially since the people you are asking are just the people on this board who turned down ross. Also, bearcats' situation is a bit different than yours since he wanted to get into trading instead of banking, where quantitative skills are valued more (plus he actually went for a reasonably tough major instead of psych).</p>

<p>what quality of firm/location are those internships? if you have relatives who are partners at a top bank you should be fine since they can just get you a job at that bank, but if you are looking to use this bank as a stepping stone into something better, you probably shouldnt be in lsa.</p>

<p>
[quote]
what quality of firm/location are those internships? if you have relatives who are partners at a top bank you should be fine since they can just get you a job at that bank, but if you are looking to use this bank as a stepping stone into something better, you probably shouldnt be in lsa.

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<p>^This would be the deciding factor. If you can get hooked up by a relative coming out of college, and the quality of the firm/role satisfies you, then by all means study what most interests you. If it's not certain, then you need to weigh the utility gained from studying psychology vs. getting a recruiting boost. If you really did have solid IB/VC internships, make sure to leverage your experience to climb the ladder in successive summers (regardless of LSA or Ross). Just know that, come junior year, such relevant experience will get you interviews with virtually every firm that comes to Ross with simply the click of a button, but if you're in LSA you're going to have to do your own recruiting/networking. I'm not sure how well-connected you are, so that drop off may not be very big.</p>

<p>What do you guys think about the following response to me:</p>

<p>OP, although Ross can give most students recruiting advantage as it is more of a target and you can apply to top jobs in your JUNIOR/SENIOR year with a click of your mouse, I think your case is a special case. Assuming that you did quality/substantial work at your internships, you're more experienced than most rising Ross juniors if not most Ross seniors. And you got all those before your sophomore year. That is pretty impressive and very rare. Ross doesn't offer you any recruiting advantage for your sophomore year. Thus, I'm confident if you want a shot at top BB jobs in your sophomore year, Ross won't help you at all. Even when junior year comes, with your experience (again, assuming they're substantial and that you build it up with another sophomore internship), you can very easily get interviews through networking (its easy because of your experiences. Its hard for most people because they don't have jack **** but naivety, thinking that their waitress job can land them a BB IBD gig with networking). So, we have established the fact that Ross won't help you much in your sophomore year and even when junior year comes, an LSA kid with substantial experiences can easily trump most Ross kids (most of whom don't have those experiences) with networking. In your case, i think you have everything to lose going to Ross (redo GPA, more workload, ******** classes) but nothing to gain (especially when even Ross kids have to network. Think about it this way. Networking basically accomplishes two things. First it allows non-targets' resumes to be reviewed and second, it helps with the selection itself. Ross kids will also need to network. But their networking will only help them with the second benefit because they already have the first benefit. LSA kids, through networking (putting in as much as Ross kids' networking effort) automatically achieves the two benefits without having to go through the ******** Ross kids have to go through). Therefore, I say if you go to Ross, you have everything to lose, but nothing to gain.</p>

<p>^This is basically what I said in my above post, but he went into much more detail. You certainly are going to have to network with bankers to get your resume read, but with Ross, all you will have to do is click a button and you will get interviews with every firm. I do not agree with this "everything to lose/nothing to gain" viewpoint. Often overlooked, being in Ross provides good networking opportunities with other students who will be similarly successful. Just something to think about. Easier (but not but by a huge amount) interview procurement and befriending potential future connections are the benefits. </p>

<p>By the way, what are you doing this summer? Certainly you must be doing something pretty good if you already have those internships.</p>