(un)competitive high school

<p>I think that my high school is fantastic and I have had some of the greatest teachers a person could hope for, but unfortunately there is a HUGE disconnect between the ap classes and normal levels.
so on paper my school looks terrible we only have a 67% graduation rate (100% for any student that survived AP chemistry). Last year the valedictorian went to yale and this year validictorian is going to stanford though yale and priceton accepted him. anyone else go to a high school where the disconnect between the top of the class and everyone else is really pronounced? what do you do you do to show colleges that while most of your school is kinda incompetent you arent</p>

<p>You don't need to do anything. If you are, they'll know.</p>

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<p>Textbook CC elitism... Wow.</p>

<p>^^ Agreed.</p>

<p>Well if others have had success with top colleges, I'd venture to say they know.</p>

<p>@veracity</p>

<p>i honestly didn't mean it that way at all, but the thing is my school seriously has a really bad reputation at least locally. and there are kids who were seniors when i was a freshman who still are seniors ...i'm a junior now. There are honestly lots of kids that are very hard working but there are also a large part that doesnt really care very much about their academic work.</p>

<p>I go to a school where the motivated students take their academics seriously, and the slackers don't. In my opinion, that's the case at the majority of schools across the country - there will always be slackers and hard workers.</p>

<p>I'd venture to say my school is even worse than yours: we have a ~50% college attendance rate, with a large number of dropouts, gang members, drug dealers, and pregnant teenagers. However, top institutions can and will recognize you for standing out, no matter the quality of your school. At my school, I simply joined the organizations that interested me and made sure to become a transformative individual and/or leader in each of those groups, though with varying success in each. :)</p>

<p>I've always had the impression that going to a school like that is better than your average high school, because AOs like to see you excelling in your situation.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I think that my high school is fantastic and I have had some of the greatest teachers a person could hope for, but unfortunately there is a HUGE disconnect between the ap classes and normal levels.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>I'm in the same situation. How do you prove you competance, then? Good AP scores should indicate your intelligence as well as good prep in your classes. But
[quote]
Last year the valedictorian went to yale and this year validictorian is going to stanford though yale and priceton accepted him.

[/quote]
it seems top schools are already aware of this phenomenon at your school.</p>

<p>
[quote]
I've always had the impression that going to a school like that is better than your average high school, because AOs like to see you excelling in your situation.

[/quote]
</p>

<p>A crappy high school (though it appears the OP's isn't) =/= adversity. It does mean you won't be competing with quite as many legacies from your own school, however. But it also means the school has fewer resources to help you compile a well-balanced college list and to communicate directly with schools to advocate for you.</p>